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Urban Inequality, Informality and Precarity in Post-revolutionary Tunisia
While the role of youth in the Arab Spring is acknowledged, their living conditions remain critical. Johannes Frische offers a fresh perspective on Tunisia’s post-revolutionary transition by examining employment and income strategies in disadvantaged urban areas. He reveals a grim reality: young people face structural unemployment, informality, and precariousness. Focusing on the low-income suburb of Ettadhamen in Greater Tunis, he highlights the impact of sociospatial segregation, economic stagnation, and social marginalization. This close-up on youth's everyday life challenges the notion of youth as a simple transitional phase, instead exposing their ongoing struggle with precarity and exclusion.

Abstract

This article presents the main findings of a three-year-long research project (2020–2023) on post-confirmation leadership training in the Church of Norway. One of the project’s key findings was that the practice of leadership training is characterized by experiences of ambiguity. Interestingly, the interactive and relational learning and development of faith within the practice are both challenged and promoted by these complex traits of ambiguity. For those who participate in leadership training, their faith and relationship with the church seem to be strengthened by the richness of the practice. Drawing on the findings from this research project and engaging other relevant research and theory on youth ministry, the article explores how experiences and patterns of ambiguity may be negotiated in a youth ministry context. With the help of pedagogical and theological theory, it further discusses dilemmas and possibilities pertaining to youth ministry`s situatedness between intentionality and institutionality, suggesting that youth ministry may operate as a sort of strategic, third ecclesial logic.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
Author:

Abstract

Youth ministry, as understood in an African context, is predominantly informed, and guided by a Western/European philosophy and hegemony. African youth ministry, it seems, is struggling to break away from the hegemony of the developed world, a hegemony that is not always compatible with the developing world (Africa, in this instance) and that also fails to deal with its problems. There has been renewed energy shown by the youth on the African continent, calling for a decolonial conversation, which, ideally, should also include theology and youth ministry. The #feesmustfall and #rhodesmustfall campaigns in South Africa have proven that the youth in the developing world remain a dominant voice for justice and transformation in spheres controlled by the adult community, those who are traditionally in power and who hold a philosophy that is often vastly different from the youth and the world that they inhabit. In a sense, one can argue that the actions in the calling for justice and transformation of the youth are indeed prophetic. This article will argue that the youth from emerging nations, such as those in Africa, have the agency to make a profound difference in (public) areas where there is injustice, thus offering a message of hope. This means of agency amongst the youth in the public domain is an expression of how youth ministry should not restrict itself to the clerical and ecclesial domains, but also how they ought to act in the public domain in applying public practical theology. Furthermore, this article argues, as a public practical theology, there is a need to build a theological theory, which is local and distinct from the Western/European context, to further the prophetic actions of the youth. The twofold aim of this article will be achieved through a theoretical approach with reflections on contemporary actions of, particularly, South African youth.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
Series Editors: and
Taking a global perspective, Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth (RPGYS) addresses specific issues related to the impact of expanding interdependency of national societies on youth conditions. At a time when youth has undergone tremendous changes in most of the countries in the world (Western, Eastern, Southern and Northern), this publication provides academics, practitioners and policy makers worldwide with exhaustive analyses and syntheses regarding youth in a global context as well as the renewed approaches needed to assess these shifts.

Young people both are affected by and are the actors of the globalization of everyday life. Mobility (travel, migration, education), multicultural backgrounds, relations to educational and job markets, demands for leisure recognition, transformation of families and of childhood and youth, and the proliferation and development of youth cultures are among the changing factors that Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth investigates on macro, meso and micro levels.

Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth welcomes proposals coming from the wide range of the human and social sciences (to include sociology, anthropology, demography, economics, psychology, linguistics, political science, history, etc.).

Each installment is a focused monograph of approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art on a specific theme in close combination with critical analysis and research.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Simona Casadio.
Author:

Abstract

This article diagnoses the difficulty of prayer for young people inhabiting a secular society and offers the beginnings of a theology of prayer for this context. For young people in the United States, our secular age is defined by immanence, excessive positivity, and dynamic stabilization that constitute anxiety as a primary motivator that leads to burnout and exhaustion. Prayer as communion with God offers a corrective that can relieve anxiety and offer renewal. For this, prayer must not be thought primarily as a human action, but a divine action. In prayer, we do not grasp God, we are grasped by God. As such, prayer is a grace young people need, and its teaching must become the primary pastoral vocation in a secular age.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

This study examines the establishment of Christian faith amongst Norwegians aged 30–40, with focus on the impact and nature of early religious influences. Employing an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design, the research synthesizes quantitative data from 585 participants, complemented by qualitative follow-ups with 10 respondents from the initial cohort. The tripartite investigation probes into the dynamics of Christian faith formation in this demographic. It particularly scrutinizes the synergy between personal relationships and engagement in Christian practices. The findings suggest a composite of activities that collectively underscore their significance. While youth ministry and parental influence during adolescence play notable roles, the qualities embodied in personal relationships – characterized by warmth, trustworthiness, and integrity – may be more crucial than the structural aspects of the relationships themselves. These insights contest conventional views of predominant influences on faith formation and religious acculturation, underscoring the salience of authentic interpersonal connections in navigating one’s spiritual trajectory.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
Based on 30 years of fieldwork in the Niger Delta, this book debunks the determinism of the resource curse theory in Nigeria, Africa's leading oil producer and the most populous country on the continent. It rather shows that oil and gas production is only one element of a social problem with much deeper roots. It also investigates the role played by the youth, a key issue in a society where half of the population is under 18 years old. To understand the multiple causes of the crisis, it thus delves into the complexity of a rich history.

Abstract

Young people are traditionally seen as the future of church and society, as “agents of change.” 1 In Europe one might be reminded of the fundamental change during the late 1960s, when mainly students formed demonstrations induced by the Vietnam war and the downsides of the bourgeois structures of society during the post ww ii-period. These experiences formed an image of youth that grounded research in sociology, psychology, and pedagogy for a long period of time and still seem to influence actual thinking and talking about youth. But is this view still appropriate? Are young people of today still “agents of change”? In the following, this image shall be contrasted with recent findings from Germany which indicate a change, a possible paradigm shift, regarding political interest, relations between generations and finally the role of youth ministry as a possible companion for young people in the middle of a changing society – and even the entire world – facing fundamental tasks.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
In: Niger Delta: The Business of the Oil Curse
In: Niger Delta: The Business of the Oil Curse