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Editor-in-Chief:
Crustaceana Monographs constitutes a series of books on carcinology in its widest sense.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to the series editor Dr. Charles Fransen (Naturalis Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands).
For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.
The Treatise on Zoology: The Crustacea volumes constitute the current standard reference to the biology and systematics of the Crustacea. Translated, updated and completed, the carcinological texts of the famous Traité de Zoologie are now available to a worldwide readership.

With this edition, the texts of the famous Traité de Zoologie now become available to a worldwide readership. Parts 1, 2, and 3A of volume VII, i.e., the Crustacea, were published in French in 1994, 1996, and 1999, respectively. The editor of the original French edition, the late J. Forest, acted as supervisory editor for the current series until his death in 2012. With J.C. von Vaupel Klein, now as editor and principal translator, and M. Charmantier and F.R. Schram as co-editors, this new version meets the current demands and expectations of the carcinological world.

All chapters have been carefully revised and adequately updated, either by the original authors or by newly attracted specialists. The series will comprise of 8 volumes (some of which will be split in fascicles of approx. 400 pp. each) and a 9th split volume on Decapoda, which was not part of the French edition.

Volumes 6 to 8 are not published yet.

Abstract

To clarify the influence of different water temperatures on the development of Portunus trituberculatus (swimming crab) larvae during off-season (early autumn) breeding, a gradient of four rearing temperatures of 27, 29, 31 and 33°C was set up, and the effects of water temperature on larval development were systematically compared. The results showed that the moulting cycle (MC) from the zoea 1 (Z1)-zoea 2 (Z2) stage was not significantly affected by water temperature ( P > 0.05 ), remaining at approximately 3 days. However, in the Z2-megalopa (M) stage, the MC in the 31°C group was consistently the shortest. The total developmental duration and total effective cumulative temperature during Z1-M in the 31°C group were the lowest at 9.97 days and 250 days · °C, respectively. According to the equation of water temperature and larval development rate, the development rate was the fastest when the water temperature was 31°C. As the water temperature increased, the survival rate (SR) of larvae at various stages gradually decreased. The SR of the 27°C group was consistently significantly higher than that of the 33°C group ( P < 0.05 ), especially in the M stage, where the SR of the 33°C group was only 2%, which was significantly lower than that of the 27°C and 29°C groups ( P < 0.05 ). Among the antioxidant indexes, both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) were the lowest in the 29°C group at 315.75 U/mg protein and 0.36 mmol/g protein, respectively, and both were significantly lower than those in the 33°C group ( P < 0.05 ). Catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) were both the lowest in the 31°C group, and in this group the CAT was significantly lower than in the 33°C group, and GSH-PX was significantly lower than in the 27°C group ( P < 0.05 ). For malondialdehyde (MDA) content, the four groups were basically maintained at about 2.5 nmol/mg protein, and there was no significant difference ( P > 0.05 ). In terms of digestive enzyme activity, the activity of lipase (LPS) was basically maintained at 1.93 U/g protein. The other four digestive enzyme activity differences were mainly reflected in that the 31 and 33°C groups maintained relatively higher levels than the 27 and 29°C groups, especially the activities of α-amylase (AMS), and cellulase (CL) in the 33°C group, which were significantly higher than those in the 27 and 29°C groups ( P < 0.05 ). Comprehensive indicators indicate that a water temperature between 29 and 31°C is the appropriate temperature for the development of the larvae of off-season breeding swimming crabs.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

The first evidence of the predation of brittle stars, Ophiothela sp. (Ophiotrichidae), by the palaemonid shrimp Phyllognathia simplex Fujino, 1973 (Palaemonidae), is presented based on a single observation accompanied by in situ photographs taken while scuba diving in Bali, Indonesia, also being the first ever observation of the feeding behaviour in this uncommon shrimp species. In addition, in situ photographs of three ovigerous females tentatatively identified as P. cf. simplex from southern Florida, U.S.A., suggest that P. simplex or a closely related species may be present in the western Atlantic. This is the first photographic evidence of the presence of the genus Phyllognathia Borradaile, 1915 in this part of the world.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

A female copepod specimen belonging to the family Botryllophilidae Sars G.O., 1921 was retrieved for the first time in December 2023 from nautical ropes of the tourist marina in Palermo (Cala Marina), near the commercial port of the city. The individual lacks many of the distinctive morpho-anatomical characteristics of the class Copepoda, as usual in cyclopoid parasites. In this group, females typically carry paired multiseriate egg sacs, which are extruded from the genital openings and lead to taxonomic identification. The family is commonly associated with tunicates. There are few reports of commensal and/or parasitic copepods associated with sea squirts in the Mediterranean Sea. This record cannot be treated as a new non-indigenous species for the Italian coasts yet, as there are no extensive studies on the distribution of the taxon.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

A single specimen of the three-spined box crab, Arcania undecimspinosa De Haan, 1841, measuring 21.0 mm CW and 20.5 mm CL, is here documented for the first time from the Arabian Sea along the north-west coast of India. Previously, the species has been only reported from the Bay of Bengal region along the Indian coast. The present study provides a detailed taxonomic description of the species with high-resolution colour photographs and line drawings, along with a key to the species of the genus Arcania known from the Indian coast.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

Urban green spaces offer opportunity to detect the response of species to environmental variations by exploring population density and body size variations. In May 2022, we collected pillbugs from five urban green spaces in Yancheng, Jiangsu, P.R. China. One-way ANOVA, principal component analysis, Cramer’s V. Mantel test and regression analysis were employed in this study. We found that the body size varied significantly among different urban spaces, while density did not. Most of the environmental properties were significantly different, except electrical conductivity and total nitrogen. The number of plant species and pH were distinguished as the main factors shaping the habitats. Body size related to the food resources, and density related to pH and vegetation coverage. Then body length and weight presented a significant positive correlation. A clumped distribution pattern of pillbugs was detected by Taylor’s and Iwao’s regressions. The environmental variations presented inconsistent effects on density and body size.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

Morphometric relationships and condition factors are essential for understanding any marine species’ development process, which aids in designing appropriate strategies for management and articulating their balance in the ecosystem — and this includes shrimps. Since only a few studies on these characteristics have been done in Penaeus semisulcatus over the last thirty years, constant updating of these criteria is required to successfully manage the shrimp fishery in Palk Bay. The CL-TW relationship demonstrates negative allometric growth in both males and females, whereas the TL-TW relationship exhibits positive allometric growth. In this present investigation, significant differences in slopes and elevations of the carapace length-total weight, total length-total weight, carapace length-total length, and total length-carapace length have been observed between sexes; considering the condition factors shown in the present investigation, the shrimps in Palk Bay were in good growing condition. This study has demonstrated that updated information on morphometric relationships would help fishery managers effectively manage the fisheries.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

A new species of potamid crab belonging to the genus Demanietta Bott, 1966 is described from a creek draining out of a karst formation associated with the Phuket Mountain Range in southern Thailand. Demanietta moror new species, belongs to a group of Demanietta species that has a relatively inflated and smooth carapace, and a male first gonopod that is weakly bent, appearing more vertically projected. It can be immediately distinguished from all congeners by its carapace, gonopod morphology and unique colour pattern in life.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

A new species of freshwater crab belonging to a group of species morphologically similar to Sundathelphusa philippina (Von Martens, 1868) is described from highlands in the province of Batangas, southern Luzon, Philippines. Sundathelphusa roberti new species, however, differs from members of this group by the position and strength of the epigastric and postorbital cristae, form of the posterior epistomal margin, shape of the third maxillipeds, and structure of the male first gonopod. The new taxon is the 35th species of Sundathelphusa known from the Philippines.

In: Crustaceana