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In 1906, Jan Łukasiewicz, a great logician, published his classic dissertation on the concept of cause, not yet available in English, containing not only a thorough reconstruction of the title concept, but also a systematization of the analytical method. It sparked an extremely inspiring discussion among the other representatives of the Lvov-Warsaw School. The main voices of this discussion are supplemented here with texts of contemporary Polish philosophers. They show how the concept of cause is presently functioning in various disciplines and point to the topicality of Łukasiewicz’s method of analysis.
This book makes the attempt to wed reason and the poetic. The tool for this attempt is Rational Poetic Experimentalism (RPE), which is being introduced and explored in this book. According to RPE, it makes sense to look for poetic elements in human reality (including reason), outside of the realm of imaginative literature. Provocatively, RPE contends that philosophy’s search for truth has not been a great success so far. So, why not experiment with philosophical concepts and look for thought-provoking ideas by employing the principles of RPE, instead of fruitlessly searching for truths using conventional methods?
Volume Editor: Vladimer Luarsabishvili
This book intends to present Mamardashvili’s philosophical perspective on modern society by exemplifying in different ways its distinctive contribution to the greater philosophical landscape. The authors aim to define both Mamardashvili’s place in the history of philosophy—among the currents of twentieth-century European thought and, in particular, phenomenology—and his relations with authors like Hegel, Proust, Deleuze, and Wittgenstein, while identifying the basic methodological instruments and substantive concepts of his thought—language, migration, citizenship, or “the freedom of complaint.” The volume will be useful both for preparatory courses (by supplying an introduction to Mamardashvili’s thought and forming the key necessary concepts) and for advanced research exigencies, allowing a professional audience to discover the remarkable insights of Mamardashvili’s philosophy.
Cet ouvrage est la première étude systématique du rapport entre communauté et littérature dans la pensée de Jean-Luc Nancy. L'auteure développe la thèse originale que cette relation doit être comprise comme une refonte du mythe. Traversant l’œuvre de Nancy dans son intégralité, elle démontre de façon incomparable comment s’articulent les questions centrales de la communauté et de la littérature. De plus, en faisant ce lien en termes de « mythe », ce livre situe l’œuvre de Nancy dans une tradition plus large, allant du romantisme allemand aux théories contemporaines de la pertinence sociale de la littérature.

This is the first book to provide a systematic investigation of the relation between community and literature in the work of Jean-Luc Nancy. It develops the original claim that this relation has to be understood as a rethinking of myth. Traversing the entirety of Nancy’s vast oeuvre, the author offers an incomparable account of the ways in which Nancy’s central questions of community and literature are linked together. Moreover, by putting this linkage in terms of ‘myth’, this book situates Nancy’s work within a larger tradition, leading from German Romanticism to contemporary theories of the social relevance of literature.

Gregory P. Floyd and Stephanie Rumpza, eds., The Catholic Reception of Continental Philosophy in North America (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020), pp. ix + 335, $ 60.00, ISBN 978-1-4875-0649-0 (cloth).

This collection of twelve essays investigates the origins of the popularity of continental philosophy in North American Catholic universities, especially when compared to its relative scarcity in non-Catholic institutions. In examining how continental philosophy came to have wide currency in North American Catholic schools, the focus of The Catholic Reception is primarily historical. As such, many of the essays, including those of Daniel Dahlstrom, John Caputo,

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

Three essays in the present issue result from a recent conference focused on the thought of Jean-Luc Marion, hosted online by the Academia Nacional de Ciencias de Buenos Aires and the Universidad del Salvador. The theme this year addressed feelings and moods, a topic seldom considered in the secondary literature, despite Marion occasionally being recognized as a “philosopher of love.” Primarily known for his notions of givenness, saturated phenomena, revelation, and his rigorous and detailed scholarship on Descartes, Marion’s contributions to a phenomenology of affectivity may seem ancillary to these predominant concepts. Yet, an attentive inspection of his complete corpus

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In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Free access
In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

Abstract

From Jean-Luc Marion’s examination of Gustave Courbet and his painting, it is shown how grief can operate as a model for the hermeneutics of love. This hermeneutics of grief, in turn, makes possible a consideration of all phenomena, and not only the human, as saturated phenomena.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

Rossano Zas Friz De Col, S.J., Ignatian Christian Life: A New Paradigm trans. Susan Dawson Vásquez, (Chestnut Hill, MA: Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, 2021), pp. xiii + 187, $ 19.95, ISBN 978-1-947617-12-4 (pbk).

Ignatian Christian Life: A New Paradigm is the latest contribution by Rossano Zas Friz De Col, S.J., to his ongoing interdisciplinary project in spiritual theology. He begins from the shift to a secularized culture, which demands a new paradigm in the Ignatian tradition. Despite this initial proposal, in subsequent chapters he only minimally develops his account of secularism, shifting his focus to issues

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Author: William Large

Abstract

Kant argues against the ontological argument for the existence of God but replaces it with a moral theism. This article analyses Kant’s moral proof with emphasis on the Critique of the Power of Judgement, and his historical and political writings. It argues that at the heart of this argument is the idea of progress. The concrete content of the moral law is the idea of a just world. Such a just world would be impossible without the idea of God, since there would be no harmony between nature and freedom. It contrasts Kant’s concept of time and history with Heidegger’s. The difference between them is a reversal of modality. For Kant, actuality determines possibility. If I cannot imagine a just word as actual, then I would fall into moral despair. The idea of God grounds this actuality. For Heidegger, possibility is higher than actuality. Since history has no teleology, then no idea of God is required.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion