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With figures such as Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Marx, Engels, and Nietzsche, the nineteenth century was a dynamic time of philosophical development. The period made lasting contributions to several fields of philosophy. Moreover, it paved the way for the development of the social sciences at the turn of the twentieth century. This volume is dedicated to exploring the rich tradition of nineteenth-century Continental philosophy in its different areas with the main purpose of highlighting the importance of this tradition in the development of the leading streams of thought of the twentieth and twenty-first century.
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This book explores the ideas of three largely forgotten radical women who participated in labor union strikes in Argentina and Uruguay, Canada, and the United States: Virginia Bolten (c.1876-1960), one of the most militant anarchists of southern South America; Helen Armstrong (1875-1947), a major leader of the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919, whose involvement in that important event in Canadian history was, for a long time, obscured by accounts that emphasized the accomplishments of men; and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890-1964), the Wobbly leader who directed many industrial strikes throughout the United States, and was one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union, who eventually became the leader of the Communist Party, USA. It also examines the contributions of two similarly neglected anarchist men who participated in labor union strikes and industrial action in New Zealand, Australia, Chile, Argentina, and Japan. Tom Barker (1887-1970) was an anarchist who eventually became a socialist who worked to promote labor unionism on four continents and who tried to create a global One Big Union for sailors. Kōtoku, Shūsui (1871-1911) was a liberal who became a socialist and finally an anarchist. An opponent of governmental imperialism and ecological mismanagement, he studied and translated the works of Western thinkers and sought to apply what he learned from other cultures to the development of Japan.
Konturierungen eines umstrittenen Themas
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Ein aktueller Überblick zur Ideen- und Missbrauchsgeschichte eines schillernden Schlagworts, aber auch zu seinen Potenzialen als philosophisches Analysewerkzeug.
Die Wortgeschichte von „Weltanschauung“ ist kurz: Zwischen seinem ersten, eher beiläufigen Auftauchen bei Kant 1790, subjektivierenden Aufladungen in der Romantik und den inflationären Ideologisierungen und Politisierungen von „Weltanschauung“ im späten 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert liegen nur 150 Jahre. Besonders sein Missbrauch durch NS-Ideologen hat das Wort in Verruf gebracht, es lebt aber u.a. im juristischen Sprachgebrauch fort und erlebt in der gegenwärtigen Religionskritik wieder etwas Konjunktur: Dort wird z.T. wieder eine naturalistische „wissenschaftliche Weltanschauung“ in Aussicht gestellt. Als philosophisches Analysewerkzeug hat das Wort aber Potenzial: „Weltanschauung“ könnte nicht nur für religiös-politische Bewertungen stehen, sondern auch für jenes implizite theoretische Koordinatensystem, das jeden Menschen in seinem Verstehen, Denken und Handeln leitet.
The Intellectual Legacies of Rudolf Bahro, Wolfgang Harich, and Robert Havemann
Rudolf Bahro, Wolfgang Harich and Robert Havemann were probably the best-known critics of the DDR’s ruling Socialist Unity Party. Yet they saw themselves as Marxists, and their demands extended far beyond a democratisation of real socialism. When environmental issues became more important in the West in the 1970s, the Party treated it as an ideological manoeuvre of the class enemy. The three dissidents saw things differently: they combined socialism and ecology, adopting a utopian perspective frowned upon by the state. In doing so, they created political concepts that were unique for the Eastern Bloc. Alexander Amberger introduces them, relates them to each other, and poses the question of their relevance then and now.
The early Frankfurt School and feminism can and should inform each other. This volume presents an original collection of scholarship bringing together scholars of the Frankfurt School and feminist scholars. Essays included in the volume explore ideas from the early Frankfurt School that were explicitly focused on sex, gender, and sexuality, and bring ideas from the early Frankfurt School into productive dialogue with historical and contemporary feminist theory. Ranging across philosophy, sociology, gender and sexuality studies, science studies, and cultural studies, the essays investigate heteropatriarchy, essentialism, identity, intersectional feminism, and liberation. Set against an alarming context of growing gender and related forms of authoritarianism, this timely volume demonstrates the necessity of thinking these powerhouse approaches together in a united front.

Contributors are: Cristian Arão, Karyn Ball, Nathalia N. Barroso, Mary Andrea Caputi, Sergio Bedoya Cortés, Jennifer L. Eagan, Lea Gekle, Imaculada Kangussu, Kristin Lawler, Jana McAuliffe, Mario Mikhail, Ryan Moore, Rafaela Pannain, Simon Reiners, Frida Sandström, Caio Vasconcellos, Tivadar Vervoort, Nicole Yokum, and Lambert Zuidervaart.