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A Discourse-Linguistic Analysis of Hosea 12–14
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How do texts of Scripture make sense or hold together as a unity? This question is especially germane to texts like Hosea whose received form is often seen as a nonintegrated composition by some, or an artful literary whole by others. Such judgments often come without clear definitions and criteria for (in)coherence. This book brings descriptive clarity to this issue through a discourse analysis of cohesion and coherence in Hosea 12–14 based on Systemic Functional Linguistics. This study gives readers tools for discourse analysis in the Hebrew bible and showcases the theme of divine mercy in Hosea 12–14.
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Sound-Worlds of Central Europe explores the sound-world of early modern Silesia via the writings of humanists active there in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries who both observed musical culture and actively participated in it: a poet, a publisher, a pedagogue, a physician, a historian, and a regionalist. Such an approach makes it possible to reconstruct their perceptions and understandings of music—a constitutive element of this community. As these authors concentrated more on the representation of music than the art itself, the book reflects the collective memory of the republic of scholars: their individual and common imaginarium.
An Intertextual Reading of the Gospel of Matthew
Although the Gospel of Matthew emphasizes Jesus as the son of David, no one has systematically investigated how 1-2 Samuel influence Matthew's portrayal of Jesus as the son of David. This work addresses that lacuna and shows how the sustained use of 1-2 Samuel in Matthew evokes the themes of mercy and righteousness as the hallmarks of a proper Davidic shepherd. The book's systematic intertextual and narrative approach offers another way to understand Matthew’s Christology and portrayal of the kingdom of heaven. It helps the reader appreciate the justice-focused nature of Jesus’ rule and its religious and political implications.
The Image of Jews and Judaism in Biblical Interpretation, from Anti-Jewish Exegesis to Eliminationist Antisemitism
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“Unheil,” curse, disaster: according to German scholar Gerhard Kittel, this is the Jewish destiny attested to in scripture. Such interpretations of biblical texts provided Adolf Hitler with the theological legitimatization necessary to realizing his “final solution.”

But theological antisemitism did not begin with the Third Reich. Ferdinand Baur’s nineteenth-century Judaism-Hellenism dichotomy empowered National Socialist scholars to construct an Aryan Jesus cleansed of his Jewish identity, building on Baur’s Enlightenment prejudices. Anders Gerdmar takes a fresh look at the dangers of the politicization of biblical scholarship and the ways our unrecognized interpretive filters may generate someone else’s apocalypse.
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Abstract

From the structure of the book to its enigmatic law codes, Leviticus poses a number of interpretive questions for readers. This article aims to tackle a variety of these questions raised by the blasphemer narrative. I will consider especially the relationship between the nature of the crime committed and the legal decision that follows. I further intend to show how the internal concerns of this pericope cohere with the concerns of the H redactor and the passage’s immediate context between chapters 23 and 25. While no doubt a difficult task, coming to an understanding of the blasphemer narrative is vital for grasping the structure and argument of Leviticus. Furthermore, this narrative raises obvious questions concerning the justice of God. Does the punishment of the blasphemer fit the crime? Does this sentencing fit with general notions of justice in the ancient world, or even with the God of Israel’s own legal standards?

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
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The recapitulation theme, which focuses on Jesus as the obedient Second Adam, provides insight into many theological topics. When examined in relation to the atonement though, it is regularly deemed insufficient to construct a fully developed model because it emphasises Jesus’s obedient Incarnation and life, which seemingly makes his death insignificant. Consequently, recapitulation concepts are often combined with other atonement theories to gain validity. In contrast, this article argues recapitulation theology can create a fully-fledged atonement model that makes Jesus’s death on the cross essential because his willing obedience towards God is only complete when he endures unto death. Furthermore, the cross signals total rejection of the innocent Jesus, which makes his crucifixion the climax of the biblical pattern where God’s obedient messengers are rejected.

Open Access
In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
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In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology

Abstract

The first two decades of the twenty-first century have manifested a large-scale revival of interest in John Calvin, Reformed Theology and popular forms of Calvinism. Journalists have scrambled to grasp the parentage of a movement which had so long been out of the public view. Sympathetic Christian writers have developed a range of hypotheses about the roots of this resurgence, with most concentrating on developments unfolding since the mid-twentieth century. This essay maintains that the actual roots of the contemporary Calvinist resurgence lie in the period following the Great War (1914–1918), when three distinguishable streams of Protestant thought found common ground and for a period of at least a quarter-century collaborated to draw attention to the resources offered in the broadly Reformed theological tradition.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology