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This volume provides a partial mapping of the ambivalent representational forms and cultural politics that have characterized Latinx identity since the 1990s, looking at literary and popular culture texts, as well as new media expressions. The chapters tackle themes related to the diversity of Latinx culture and experience, as represented in different media the borderland context, issues related to gender and sexuality, the US–Mexico borderland context, and the connections between spatiality and Latinx self-representation—sketching the “now” of Latinx representation and considering that “Latinx” is an unstable signifier, and the present, as well as culture and media, are always in motion.
Volume Editor:
Canvasing a range of materials that include early tales of exemplarity, medieval song lyrics, Ming-Qing poetry and plucked rhymes, twentieth century writings about revolutionaries, opera stars, missionaries, and contemporary fiction, this volume illustrates the discourse and representation of friendship in which women gain agency and participate in broader arguments about ethics, politics, and religious transcendence. Friendship prompts reflections on gender roles, becomes the venue of literary self-consciousness, and heightens the sense of literary community. Gender and community function in new ways through the public dimension of friendship, and most importantly, the intersections of gender and friendship enable us to rethink other relationships.
When was male domination established in human societies, and why did it take hold? How does humanity's most remote past inform today's feminist struggle?
This new, updated edition of Primitive Communism Is Not What It Used to Be – available for the first time in English translation – represents a timely contribution to the debate, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of ethnology and archaeology.
While noting the many outdated aspects of Morgan and Engels' seminal work, this vast synthesis, guided by a rigorous materialist approach, renews Marxist analysis on a theme that is at once remote and pressingly topical.
Author:
In what ways did Qing gentry women’s concern for gender and social propriety shape their assertions of female subjectivity and agency? How did they exploit the state promotion of female virtue and Confucian morality for self-fulfillment?
With a focus on three of the most widely acclaimed mid-Qing women authors, this book uses both synchronic and diachronic approaches to analyze writings on conjugal love, widowhood, women’s education, maternal teaching, boudoir objects, and history, illustrating their vibrant, gendered revision of literati poetic convention, thus proposing an alternative analytical framework that goes beyond the rigid dichotomy of compliance versus resistance.
Before the invention of synthetic sponges, divers culled the seabeds of the Aegean for animal sponges or "sea gold" to supply global demand, while risking paralysis or death from decompression disease. This is a study of sponge diving and the impact of the industry on the inhabitants of Kalymnos and Mediterranean. It is a record of the 10,000 divers who died, the 20,000 who were paralysed between 1886 and 1910, and the women who were there to sustain them when they returned home.
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Abstract

In 1798 Sophie de Grouchy (1764–1822) appended her eight Lettres sur la sympathie to her translation of Adam Smith’s The Theory of Moral Sentiments. In recent years her Lettres have attracted considerable scholarly attention, but interpretative errors, resulting from considering selections in isolation, have slipped into readings of de Grouchy’s work that undermine her originality and the unity of her views regarding ethical theory. The purpose of this paper is to correct prior readings and to properly recover Sophie de Grouchy’s voice for the philosophical canon. Topics include the origin of sympathy, the significance of pleasure and pain in de Grouchy, sympathy and social relations, the role of reason and sentiments in our moral disposition, and mislabeling de Grouchy’s philosophy. In all, de Grouchy grounds her complex ethics and political philosophy in sympathy, reason, reflection, and human dependency in an overarching vision of humanity that is hopeful and optimistic.

In: Journal of the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists
Author:

Abstract

The first part of this paper investigates the purpose, methodological approach, and fundamental thesis of Du Châtelet’s theory of simple beings. The paper shows that ‘simple beings’ in Du Châtelet is a theory concerned with the understanding of extended bodies. The second part of the paper shows that her theory of simple beings, while it has important roots in both Leibniz and Wolff, is remarkably different from theirs. Thus, contrary to a common thread in the literature, Du Châtelet’s theory of simple beings does not commit her to an ontology that can be equated with that of Leibniz or Wolff. Instead, her theory of simple beings is faculty-centred and draws a fundamental and novel distinction between the phenomenal realm of the senses and ‘real’ substances, which can only be grasped through the understanding.

Open Access
In: Journal of the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists
The Myth of Hercules and Omphale in the Visual Arts, 1500–1800
The book examines the myth of Hercules and Omphale/Iole which became an important topic in the visual arts, 1500–1800. It offers an analysis of the iconography from the perspective of the history of emotions, classical and Neo-Latin philology, reception and gender studies. The early modern inventions of the myth excel in a skilful display of mixed and compound emotions, such as the male character's psychopathology, and of the theatrical performance of emotions by the female character.
Volume Editors: and
Edited by Rose Mary Allen and Sruti Bala, this comprehensive handbook of gender studies scholarship on the Dutch Caribbean islands thematically covers the history of movements for gender equality; the relation of gender to race, colonialism, sexuality; and the arts and popular culture. The handbook offers unparalleled insights into a century of debates around gender from the six islands of the Dutch Caribbean (Curaçao, Bonaire, Aruba, St. Maarten, St. Eustatius and Saba).

This handbook makes gender studies in the Dutch Caribbean accessible to an international readership. Besides key academic writings, it includes primary historical sources, translations from Papiamento and Dutch, as well as personal memoirs and poetry.