Browse results

Volume Editors: and
This volume, edited by Leyla Dakhli and Klaus Wieland, is an overview of the cultural memory of the Lebanese Civil War, as it has emerged and evolved over the last 30 years. These narratives represent a counter-memory to the non-existent national memory, undesired by Lebanon's political class.

In 1991, the Amnesty Law G84/91 was enacted, granting state power impunity for all war crimes, including crimes against humanity. The general amnesty entailed partial amnesia; the war was to be "officially" forgotten. And yet, since the 1990s, nongovernmental organizations, archives, activists, publicists, visual artists, filmmakers, and writers have produced an impressive alternative culture of remembrance of the Lebanese Civil War, which is revisited and analyzed in this book. Contributors represent a multi-disciplinary mix, with perspectives from area studies, history, social science, literary studies, trauma and memory, and peace and conflict studies.
Author:
This book examines the interrelationships between trauma, time, and narrative in the novel “The Journey” (1962) by the scholar, novelist, poet, and Holocaust survivor H. G. Adler. Drawing on Paul Ricœur’s philosophy of time and studies of time in literature, Julia Menzel analyzes how Adler’s novel depicts the experience of time as a dimension of Holocaust victims’ trauma. She explores the aesthetic temporality of “The Journey” and presents a new interpretation of the literary text, which she conceives of as a modern “Zeit-Roman” (time novel).

Die Studie untersucht die Wechselbeziehungen zwischen Trauma, Zeit und Erzählung in dem Roman „Eine Reise“ (1962) des Wissenschaftlers, Schriftstellers, Dichters und Holocaust-Überlebenden H. G. Adler. Unter Bezugnahme auf Paul Ricœurs Zeitphilosophie und die literaturwissenschaftliche Zeitforschung analysiert Julia Menzel, wie Adlers Roman traumatische Zeiterfahrungen der Opfer des Holocaust zur Darstellung bringt. Sie erkundet die ästhetische Eigenzeit von „Eine Reise“ und eröffnet eine neue Lesart des literarischen Texts, den sie als modernen Zeit-Roman begreift.
Jews Passing as Gentiles in Post-WWII and Multicultural American Fiction
Author:
Racial passing has fascinated thousands of American readers since the end of the nineteenth century. However, the phenomenon of Jews passing as gentiles has been all but overlooked. This book examines forgotten novels depicting Jewish Americans masquerading as gentiles. Exploring two "waves" of publications of this subgenre—in the 1940s-1950s and 1990s-2000s—this book raises questions about the perceptions of Jewish difference during these periods.Looking at issues such as Whiteness, Americannes, gender, and race, it traces the changes in the representation of Jewish identity during the second half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the new millennium. Ohad Reznick’s Imagined Non-Jews is an important intervention in the scholarship on the literature of passing. This book also makes a significant contribution to Jewish American literary studies through thoughtful close readings of texts from the 1940s and 1950s, many of them little-known today, as well as multi-ethnic American fiction from the turn-of-the-21st-century, all of them featuring characters who conceal their Jewishness in order to pass for gentile. —Lori Harrison-Kahan, Boston College, author of The White Negress: Literature, Minstrelsy, and the Black-Jewish Imaginary
This volume highlights the importance of diverse voices and perspectives in understanding the history and heritage of psychiatry. Exploring the complex interrelations between psychiatry, heritage and power, Narrating the Heritage of Psychiatry complicates the pervasive biomedical narrative of progress in which the history of psychiatry is usually framed. By examining multiple perspectives, including those of users/survivors of mental health services, the collection sheds light on neglected narratives and aims to broaden our understanding of psychiatric history and current practices. In doing so, it also considers the role of art, activism, and community narratives in reimagining and recontextualizing psychiatric heritage. This volume brings into conversation perspectives from practitioners as well as scholars from the humanities and social sciences.
Thinking with Stephanos Stephanides
Volume Editor:
The book captures key moments in the critical and creative dialogue of literary scholars, poets and artists with poet, author, documentary film-maker and literary scholar Stephanos Stephanides. Employing a polyphonic and cross-disciplinary perspective, the twenty-three essays and creative pieces flow together in cycles of continuities and discontinuities, emulating Stephanides’s fluid and transgressive universe. Drawing on the broad topic of borders and crossings, Shifting Horizons and Crossing Borders offers critical material on themes such as space and place, dislocation and migration, journeys and bridges, movement and fluidity, the aesthetics and the politics of the sea, time, nostalgia and (trans)cultural memory, identity and poetics, translation and translatability, home and homecoming. An invaluable reference for anyone interested in the crosscurrents between the poetic, the cultural and the political.
Volume Editor:
Against the backdrop of an insurgent far right and numerous deadly neo-Nazi attacks, various cultural practitioners have written far-right violence into Germany’s collective memory and imagined more inclusive futures in its wake. This volume explores contemporary examples from literature, music, theatre, film, television and art that respond to this situation. They demonstrate that, alongside the ways in which art expands the public sphere in terms of what is said and who is heard, aesthetic questions of how artistic works are presented are a crucial part of how they open up new perspectives.
Author:

Abstract

Der Beitrag argumentiert anhand der Romane 89/90 von Peter Richter und Als ich mit Hitler Schnapskirschen aß von Manja Präkels, dass zahlreiche Texte der sogenannten Wendekinder-Generation die Themen von Gewalterfahrung und (politischer) Radikalisierung unter Jugendlichen in den frühen 1990er Jahren in den literarischen und öffentlichen Diskurs zur Wende- und Nachwendeerzählung einschreiben. Die Texte werden als Adoleszenzromane, Wendeliteratur und literarisches Archiv zur jugendlichen Subkultur der frühen 1990er Jahre betrachtet. Die neuen Freiheiten der Heranwachsenden werden durch die Ausbreitung eines rechten Spektrums eingeschränkt –Strategien im Umgang mit der aufkommenden Gewalt (Aufbruchsstimmung oder Desillusionierung) werden untersucht. Es wird beobachtet, dass es aus Sicht der Figuren weniger die weltpolitischen Ereignisse sind, die den Schritt zum Erwachsenwerden ausmachen; zentral stehen Verlust von Freundschaften, Spaltung der jugendlichen Gemeinschaft und Gewalterfahrung. Die Adoleszenz bildet hier metaphorisch Transformation ab und bietet so ein universell verständliches Erzählformat für die Erzählung über die Wende und Nachwendezeit.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany
Author:

Abstract

This essay explores the affective assemblages of abjection and pessimism in the Netflix series Dogs of Berlin. I argue that the series offers a critique of neoliberal cosmopolitanism and its narratives of progress both on the level of narration and on the level of affect, sensation and temporalities. With its pre-emptive narration, its evocation of complex factual and fictional temporalities of Berlin and its emphasis on abjection, Dogs of Berlin questions and challenges the promises of neoliberal cosmopolitanism, foregrounding its intensely corrosive and fatal forces from precarity to racism and homophobia. Engaging with theories of abjection, particularly those pertaining to the questions of migration and alterity such as Peter Nyers’s framework of “abject cosmopolitanism”, I view Dogs of Berlin as a powerful intervention into reconciliatory narratives of neoliberal discourse.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany

Abstract

In diesem literaturwissenschaftlichen Artikel wird das Künstlernetzwerk BSMG (Black Superman Group) und ihr Album Platz an der Sonne (2017) als politisierter künstlerischer Protest gegen Rassismus untersucht. Der Fokus liegt auf der poetischen Faktur und der Werkstruktur des Albums, wobei auch Bobbie Serranos Illustrationen der Regenmacher Tour, die Features Edition des Albums analysiert werden. Dabei wird gezeigt, wie sich das Künstlernetzwerk als Zusammenschluss gegen Rassismus inszeniert und alternative Formen von Zugehörigkeit und ein multidimensionales positives Selbstbild Schwarzer Deutscher präsentiert, das zur Identifikation mit den selbsternannten Black Supermen aufruft. Die musikalisch-poetische Vernetzung der Künstler*innen mit Aktivist*innen und Freiheitskämpfer*innen soll dabei zur Identifikation mit dem Netzwerk anregen.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany