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In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

We examine the feasibility of combining elements from the framework of program theory with the Documentational Approach to Didactics to gauge the fidelity and character of teachers’ implementation of scripted teaching sequences for primary school. By analyzing two video-recorded lessons from two teachers’ implementation of the program Thinking, Reasoning, and Reckoning, we found that the teachers made adaptations to the prescribed organization of teaching. Both teachers attended to the intended organization of content, but their attendance to the intended classroom interaction patterns differed. Through the Documental Approach to Didactics, we could explain some of the differences between the teachers. The findings provide a background for a discussion of teachers’ adaptations to the new resource and the documental genesis process initiated by the implementation. The results will be used for revising the teacher guide used in the implementation.

The impact sheet to this article can be accessed at 10.6084/m9.figshare.19493891.

Open Access
In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

The importance of mathematical problem solving has long been recognized, yet its implementation in classrooms remains a challenge. In this paper we put forth the notion of problem-solving implementation chain as a dynamic sequence of intended, planned, enacted and experienced activity, shaped by researchers, teachers and students, where the nature of the activity and its aims may change at the links of the chain. We propose this notion as an analytical framework for investigating implementation of problem-solving resources. We then illustrate this framework by a series of narratives from a project, in which the team of task-designers develops problem-solving resources aimed at reaching middle-school students via their teachers, who encounter these resources in professional development communities. We show how the problem-solving activity evolves along the implementation chain and then identify opportunities for mutual learning that emerge from tensions in perspectives on PS held by the different parties involved.

The impact sheet to this article can be accessed at 10.6084/m9.figshare.19493903.

In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

This paper presents an implementation process model for designing and implementing tasks that provide formative feedback in the online learning environment of mathematics classrooms. Specifically, the model operationalises components of Vergnaud’s notion of scheme. The implementation process model features a task sequence guided by controlled variation and a ‘dual scheme idea’. Using such a sequence of tasks, this work illustrates how Vergnaud’s notion of scheme can be used to aid teachers in hypothesising about their learners’ understanding of problems involving linear equations, ultimately providing improved feedback for teachers and improved opportunities for student learning in online environments. In Denmark, the online environment matematikfessor.dk is used by approximately 80% of Danish K-9 students.

The impact sheet to this article can be accessed at 10.6084/m9.figshare.19493846.

Open Access
In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

This paper reports an exploratory study of political factors that may influence the implementation of research knowledge in the formulation of educational reforms and mathematics textbooks in Mexico. The study is based on the analysis of an in-depth interview with a key informant, who has extensive experience as a textbook author and as an advisor in the Ministry of Education of Mexico. Three political factors that may influence the implementation of research knowledge from mathematics education are identified: (1) interest-based coalitions — such as mathematics teachers and their associations, (2) issues of (mis)communication within decision venues, and (3) the level of compatibility and alignment of mathematical and didactical contents with the political agendas.

The impact sheet to this article can be accessed at 10.6084/m9.figshare.19493873.

In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education
Series Editor: David Clarke
The Learner’s Perspective Study provides a vehicle for the work of an international community of classroom researchers. The work of this community will be reported in a series of books of which this is the second. The documentation of the practices of classrooms in other countries causes us to question and revise our assumptions about our own practice and the theories on which that practice is based. International comparative and cross-cultural research has the capacity to inform practice, shape policy and develop theory at a level commensurate with regional, national or global priorities. International comparative research offers us more than insights into the novel, interesting and adaptable practices employed in other school systems. It also offers us insights into the strange, invisible, and unquestioned routines and rituals of our own school system and our own classrooms. In addition, a cross-cultural perspective on classrooms can help us identify common values and shared assumptions, encouraging the adaptation of practices from one classroom for use in a different cultural setting. As these findings become more widely available, they will be increasingly utilised in the professional development of teachers and in the development of new theory.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to the Aquisitions Editor, John Bennett.
Series Editors: Adalira Saénz-Ludlow and Luis Radford
This series is dedicated to the diversity of semiotic perspectives that, directly or indirectly, influence the learning and the teaching of mathematics.
Themes and Issues from an African Perspective
This book examines the Ethiopian higher education sector through an exploration of its various dimensions, challenges and prospects. Albeit one of the largest systems in the continent, the sector has received little research attention in the past. The book bridges this gap by marshalling a variety of current themes and issues with their wider implications for continental and global higher education. The chapters are structured in such a way that general readers, professionals and students of higher education can have a good grasp of the Ethiopian higher education sector as a microcosm of the African higher education ecosystem.