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Volume Editors: and
Step into the lives of extraordinary women leaders in this groundbreaking volume. This compelling collection presents autoethnographies of twenty-five women leaders in English Language Teaching (ELT) from around the world. Grounded in key leadership theories and ELT research, these narratives examine the intersectionality of gender, race, culture, and transnational experiences in shaping leadership identities. Authors candidly share their triumphs and challenges, inspiring readers to embrace their own leadership potential and effect change in their communities and beyond. By articulating the personal, institutional, and global complexities, the narratives inform our understanding of how ELT teachers navigate the path to leadership.

Contributors are: Tasha Austin, Lena Barrantes-Elizondo, Kisha Bryan, Quanisha Charles, May F. Chung, Ayanna Cooper, Tanya Cowie, Taslim Damji, Darlyne de Haan, Su Yin Khor, Sarah Henderson Lee, Gloria Park, Ana-Marija Petrunic, Doaa Rashed, Kate Mastruserio Reynolds, Teri Rose Dominica Roh, Mary Romney-Schaab, Amira Salama, Cristina Sánchez-Martín, Xatli Stox, Debra Suarez, Shannon Tanghe, Lan Wang-Hiles, Marie Webb and Amea Wilbur.
Revisiting Critical Event Narrative Inquiry
This thought-provoking research anthology adopts a postmodern stance and fills in a gap of knowledge for the education of professional development in teacher education, health sciences and the arts. Allowing subjectivity and multiple voices, the authors add to the intimate and negotiated knowledge of being and becoming – indigenous, architect, mother, teacher, health researcher, and supervisor. In fifteen chapters, the authors share knowledge of pain and reward in critical events in the realm of professional identity formation. The book provides a selection of personal and far-reaching stories and adds to the reflexivity of memories of critical events.

Contributors are: Geir Aaserud, Åsta Birkeland, Bodil H. Blix, Sidsel Boldermo, Mimesis Heidi Dahlsveen, Nanna Kathrine Edvardsen, Rikke Gürgens Gjærum, Tona Gulpinar, Carola Kleemann, Tove Lafton, Mette Bøe Lyngstad, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Anna-Lena Østern, Alicja R. Sadownik, Tiri Bergesen Schei and Vibeke Solbue.
Author:

Abstract

“Muitalus” is “story” or “narrative” in North Sámi. The word is closely related to the word for “remember” – “muitit”. The objective of narrative inquiry is to transform those who are participating. Such an enquiry must carry expectations for the future. In indigenous societies, telling stories has always been a means of transferring knowledge, sharing knowledge of expected behavior, or learning experiences. From the stories and the process of storytelling in a research project on language vitalization in a Sámi kindergarten department, I explore three themes in this article: language, identity, and Sámi pedagogy as experienced in Sámi practices. The stories are not merely material for this article, but they have been, and continue to be, a way of making ourselves – the participants – conscious about who has the power of defining Sámi, and how we, with our backgrounds may, or have the right to, work with strengthening Sámi language and culture in a Sea-Sámi area.

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to illustrate how poetic narratives, created based on lived experience of supervision, can contribute to raising awareness of the involved parties’ professional identity development, as well as of values and premises for dialogic and relational doctoral supervision. Applying narrative inquiry as the analytical entry point (Caine, Estefan, & Clandinin, 2013), five central dimensions of research supervision are discussed (Lee, 2008). The 16 narratives presented in this article have been developed through a creative co- design partnership between the supervisor and the research fellow. Supervision is illustrated by concentrating on the two parties’ narratives relating to time, place, and relation. The article focuses on the most primary dimension, the relational, which is linked to vulnerability in life. Methodologically, the article moves autoethnographically between performance and sensory ethnography (Pink, 2015; Denzin, 1997) as its scientific theoretical foundation.

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities

Abstract

This chapter, as the book in hand, written in the spirit of John Dewey, considers personal experience as scientific exploration. Personal growth and formative development are highlighted as important in many aspects of life, including professional work-life. We introduce how professional identities are continuously developed in processes of cultural formation and unpack episodes from various professions. It becomes apparent how personal experience is entangled with the shaping of professional identities. We introduce three questions: Who are we, in relation to our profession? What can we learn about the formation of professional identity from a narrative inquiry? How can we extend our understanding of the formation of professional identity from the perspective of critical event narratives?

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities
Author:

Abstract

This autobiographic narrative inquiry is based upon the author’s cross- cultural research and collaboration between Chinese and Norwegian teacher education programmes. Through this long-term commitment and repeated crossing of national, ideological, and linguistic borders, stories have been lived, told, and retold. These encounters with various boundaries have provided fertile ground for making sense of the world and for her to become who she is in the midst of these stories. Participating in cross-cultural research and international teacher programmes is therefore not purely limited to epistemology and the understanding of other cultures in theory, but rather, these experiences provide potential interplay and dialogue between “insiders” and “outsiders” and have shaped her professional identity as a cross-cultural educator and researcher. The professional identity is not a static position but something relational and dynamic in time and place, always on the threshold of a symbolic place of ambiguity and tension.

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities
To solve the global challenges of the present society, contemporary scholarship requires that all diverse social groups are included in knowledge production through education. Professionalisation is one way in which diverse social groups can engage in knowledge production in higher education. While all kinds of professionalisation produce citizens who can contribute to the social, political and economic development, the teaching profession is foundational as most people have come through the hands of teachers from basic to higher education.

Teaching has been referred to as the noblest of professions because it does not only require acquisition of knowledge and skills, but high levels of professionalism, dignity, honour and the ability to lead by example. While inclusion of all diverse social groups is topical after attainment of independence in African countries largely and in South Africa particularly, professionalisation of students with disabilities into the teaching profession and in settings for integrated learning, has received little attention from scholars in the disability field.

Professionalisation of Students with Disabilities into the Teaching Profession in South African Higher Education critically reflects on what affordances and challenges face students with disabilities in professionalisation into the teaching professions and on how students are socialised to identify with the profession. It does so from the lived experiences of students with disabilities, the academics who teach them, the support staff and the author’s nuanced understanding of the professionalisation, the teaching profession, and transformation to include all in the South African context of higher education.

Abstract

How can one single episode in a young life be a turning point? One might think that turning points are experiences like great losses or traumatic love affairs. However, in this autobiographical narrative, I am going to present and unpack a seemingly insignificant event that was nevertheless very significant for me and for the formation of my professional identity. Yet, it is not simply about me as a person, but rather the emotional and muscular phenomena that occur when sudden and unexpected events become so existential that important decisions about one’s professional life end up being made.

At the core of the story is my choir conductor, who behaved and acted as if she had little knowledge about the social processes that shape young people. Her judgement has taught me what is at stake when I, as a teacher, find myself in situations where I could make a misstep and behave in an ethically questionable manner.

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities
Author:

Abstract

In this text, I will perform a critical analysis of some of the ongoing research on current Holocaust education in Norway. I will also focus on my own research on inclusion and an equal education for all. Lately, I have been reflecting on why I have some misgivings around both my own research, and that of others in this field. By using autoethnographical narrative inquiry, my own memory will come into contact with my professional life. I think of it as using the feeling of concern as a critical lens. By using my own concern to look at these fields with a critical eye, I have arrived at the following three themes I want to discuss in a critical light. Those are:

  1. An equal education for all
  2. The education about evil
  3. The feeling of shame

By discussing these three elements in light of theories of education on the Holocaust and my own research, I want to look more closely to see if the concern experienced can tell me something about the existing knowledge in the field.

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities

Abstract

The aesthetic and performative aspects of professional identity are closely linked to what we sense through taste, smell and sight. In this article, we discuss professional identity narratively, and memories of experiences as tools of professional development. We question how time, space and imagination shape the authors’ professional practice. Our past and present subjective experiences are revealed through a personal narrative. As an opportunity to grasp and understand professional judgement through taste, smell and sight, Babettes feast enters the discussion.

Open Access
In: The Shaping of Professional Identities