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In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

The paper focuses on the 12th chapter of the *Saddharmaparikathā, a Buddhist homileticians’ guidebook containing sample sermons, dealing with the topic of gambling (dyūta). I edit, translate, and discuss the chapter with an introduction that includes a short overview of gambling in Sanskrit literature at large. The anonymous author is dismissive of gambling in all its forms, whether it is practised for material gain, for mere pleasure, and even if studied as an art. In spite of its exiguity, his discussion of the topic is, as far as we are aware, the most comprehensive in classical Buddhist literature.

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In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

This is the first notice, edition, and translation of a royal order in Sanskrit, engraved on a set of three copper-plates kept in the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The inscription is dated to the seventh year of the reign of Nannarāja I, king of the Pāṇḍuvaṃśin lineage active in Dakṣiṇa Kosala in the sixth and seventh centuries CE. The inscription provides important new information about a family of engravers, probably relocated from Śarabhapura to Sirpur, who served both the Śarabhapurīya and Pāṇḍuvaṃśin courts. The plates further suggest that Nannarāja I, as the first Pāṇḍuvaṃśin king of South Kosala, continued the epigraphic traditions of the Śarabhapurīyas, whom he may have served with his father Indrabala in his early career before the conflicts which brought him to power.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
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In: Indo-Iranian Journal
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In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale
Author:

Abstract

A heretofore unrecognized prefix **g- is reconstructed for Proto-Bodish as an agentive transitivization prefix. This prefix is fossilized before liquids in at least 9 Tamangic verbs, and preserved as a root preinitial in at least 39 Tibetan verbs. The semantic value of agentive transitivization is characterized as an increase in the level of Agent involvement, and/or in the Agent’s conscious effort in performing the action. I describe a newly-documented suffix - in Sikleś Gurung (Tamangic) which innovatively grammaticalize this meaning category. The reconstruction of **g- lends support to the notional Bodish subgroup by grounding it in a shared innovation.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale

Abstract

Khmer displays extensive diachronic phonological restructuring (Huffman, 1976), especially in the realization of initial stops. These changes include (i) devoicing and merger of voiced and voiceless stops, and (ii) the emergence of implosives from pre-vocalic voiceless stops. However, the details and the chronology of these changes remain unclear in many respects. This paper proposes a chronology of the two changes based on philological evidence: Chinese transcriptions of Khmer words in the Zhēnlà Fēngtǔ Jì (ZFTJ), a travel account from the late 13th century. Previous research on ZFTJ by Pelliot (1951) suggested that implosives had already emerged at the time of transcription, while the merger of voiced and voiceless stops had at least started. This is at odds with the general view of Khmer language history. I motivate a revised analysis of the Khmer transcriptions in the ZFTJ and show that the devoicing and merger of voiced and voiceless stops in fact had not yet occurred at the end of the 13th century. There is, however, not enough evidence from ZFTJ to confirm whether implosives had already emerged.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale
Author:

Abstract

There are nearly 20 words with Middle Chinese onsets s- or sr- whose reflexes in modern Southeastern Sinitic (Mǐn, Southern Wú, Hakka, and Gàn) are aspirated affricates. Examples of such words include 撕 ‘to tear,’ 粟 ‘grain,’ xiān 鮮 ‘fresh,’ and xīng 星 ‘star.’ This paper reveals that there are at least four origins for these correspondence sets, three of which can be connected with Old Chinese. The remaining is a self-innovation of the ancestor of the Southeastern Sinitic group. In this sense, the reflexes of modern Southeastern Sinitic can be taken as an important additional material in the reconstruction of Old Chinese.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale

Abstract

Evans’ 2006b recognition of a phonological opposition between plain and uvularized vowels in the Hóngyán variety of Northwestern Rma was an important discovery for Rma linguistics, yet the diachronic origins of this phenomenon have not been fully considered. This paper considers the origin of uvularized vowels in the Hóngyán dialect through comparison with the tonal Lóngxī variety, finding plain and uvularized vowels in Hóngyán to correspond regularly with H and L tones in Lóngxī Rma.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale