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Author: Petr Balcárek
This book offers the first comprehensive study of Byzantine influence on the art and iconography of East Central Europe. Petr Balcárek focuses on the Byzantine cultural and religious legacy in the Czech lands, thereby bringing to light rarely seen images and presenting fresh hypotheses based on newly-explored theological interpretations and historical evidence.

Including a discussion of the Czech and Slovak historiography on Byzantine studies, the work analyses significant artistic and iconographical artefacts in light of the intricate historical and political relationships that shaped Byzantine presence in these territories, comparing them with similar objects from other areas of Byzantine influence in order to draw wide-reaching conclusions.
Thirty years after the fall of Soviet power, we are beginning to understand that the experience of Muslims in the USSR continued patterns of adaptation and negotiation known from Muslim history in the lands that became the Soviet Union, and in other regions as well; we can also now understand that the long history of Muslims situating religious authority locally, in the various regions that came under Soviet rule, in fact continued through the Soviet era into post-Soviet times.
The present volume is intended to historicize the question of religious authority in Muslim Central Eurasia, through historical and anthropological case studies about the exercise, negotiation, or institutionalization of authority, from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century; it thus seeks to frame Islamic religious history in the areas shaped by Russian and Soviet rule in terms of issues relevant to Muslims themselves, as Muslims, rather than solely in terms of questions of colonial rule.

Contributors are Sergei Abashin, Ulfat Abdurasulov, Bakhtiyar Babajanov, Devin DeWeese, Allen J. Frank, Benjamin Gatling, Agnès Kefeli, Paolo Sartori, Wendell Schwab, Pavel Shabley, Shamil Shikhaliev, and William A. Wood.
The New Economics (Theory and Practice): 1922-1928
Evgeny A. Preobrazhensky was Russia’s foremost economist in the 1920s. This volume editorially reconstructs his theory of socialist industrialisation in an agrarian country and relates it to previous socialist theories and to issues of political struggle, culture and communist morality. The editors create a unique portrait of Preobrazhensky as an economist and social theorist, assess the viability of NEP as a model of economic growth, and identify the fault lines that contributed to the split in the Trotskyist Opposition and its defeat in the struggle against Stalin. The bulk of the work consists of the important An Attempt to Provide a Theoretical Analysis of the Soviet Economy, while the material in Volume III focuses on concrete analysis.
Evgeny A. Preobrazhensky was Russia’s foremost economist in the 1920s. This volume editorially reconstructs his theory of socialist industrialisation in an agrarian country and relates it to previous socialist theories and to issues of political struggle, culture and communist morality. The bulk of the work consists of Preobrazhensky’s Concrete Analysis of the Soviet Economy, which supplements his theoretical inquiry published in Volume II. A number of appendices present Preobrazhensky’s analysis of the NEP and his correspondence with Trotsky alongside extensive contributions by the volume’s editors and translators.
Yiddish-Slavic Language Contact and its Linguistic Outcome
Yiddish, the language of Eastern-European Jews, has so far been mostly described as Germanic within the framework of the traditional, divergence-based Language Tree Model. Meanwhile, advances in contact linguistics allow for a new approach, placing the idiom within the mixed language spectrum, with the Slavic component playing a significant role. So far, the Slavic elements were studied as isolated, adstratal borrowings. This book argues that they represent a coherent system within the grammar. This suggests that the Slavic languages had at least as much of a constitutive role in the inception and development of Yiddish as German and Hebrew. The volume is copiously illustrated with examples from the vernacular language.
With a contribution of Anna Pilarski, University of Szczecin.