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Ehrenstatuen in öffentlichen Räumen Siziliens vom Hellenismus bis in die Spätantike
Honores inauditi bietet erstmals eine systematische Untersuchung der Ehrenstatuen Siziliens. Vor dem Hintergrund der wechselvollen Geschichte der Insel werden die Ehrenstatuen von den ersten archäologischen Zeugnissen für Könige in der Mitte des 3. Jhs. v. Chr. über die Kaiserzeit bis zum Ende der Praxis in der Spätantike in den Blick genommen. Das archäologische und epigraphische Material weist auf eine deutliche Kontinuität hin, zeigt aber auch Veränderungen der Monumente, der Beteiligten, bei der Sprache der Inschriften und bei ihrer räumlichen Anordnung. Dieser Wandel wird in einen Kontext mit übergreifenden Entwicklungen, aber auch mit lokalen Faktoren wie Stadtgeschichte und überregionalen Handelsrouten gestellt.

Honores inauditi offers the first comprehensive study of honorary statues and their spatial and social context in Sicily. Based on a catalogue of mostly unpublished material, the book traces honorary statues throughout their historical development, starting from the first archaeologically known honorary statues erected for kings in the mid-3rd c. BC until the practice’s decline in Late antiquity. Although continuously used, various changes are detected throughout time: the monuments’ material and size, their display, the language of the inscriptions and the actors involved. These changes are contextualized by overarching developments such as trade routes, as well as local urban factors.
Editor: Stefan Schorn
This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new editions of the Greek paradoxographers of the Imperial Period and of uncertain date, fragmentary and non-fragmentary alike. It also includes the fragments of the related types of works On Rivers and On Stones. For the first time, all these texts have been provided with a comprehensive commentary. Together with volume IV E 1, this will constitute a new corpus of Greek paradoxography which will make Greek thought on the marvelous accessible to scholars of antiquity and later times.
Volume Editors: Mischa Meier and Federico Montinaro
This volume offers an extensive introduction to 6th-century Byzantine historian Procopius of Caesarea, widely regarded as one of the last great historians of Antiquity. Procopius’ monumental oeuvre is our main contemporary source for an array of highly significant historical developments during the reign of Justinian I (527-565), ranging from warfare with Persia in the East and the reconquest of large parts of the Western Empire from the Goths and Vandals to aspects of social and economic history.

Contributors are: Harmut Leppin, Brian Croke, Geoffrey Greatrex, Philip Rance, Rene Pfeilschifter, Michael Whitby, Bruno Bleckmann, Laura Mecella, Timo Stickler, Marek Jankowiak, Charles Pazdernik, Hans-Ulrich Wiemer, Henning Börm, Anthony Kaldellis, Umberto Roberto, Olivier Gengler, and Élodie Turquois.
Author: Sofia Piacentin
Private property in Rome effectively measures the suitability of each individual to serve in the army and to compete in the political arena. What happens then, when a Roman citizen is deprived of his property? Financial penalties played a crucial role in either discouraging or effectively punishing wrongdoers. This book offers the first coherent discussion of confiscations and fines in the Roman Republic by exploring the political, social, and economic impact of these punishments on private wealth.
Empire and Emperors in the III Century
Volume Editor: Alessandro Galimberti
The History of the Empire from the Death of Marcus of Herodian in eight books, written in Greek, is a key source for the period from the reign of Commodus (AD 180) to that of Gordian III (238). Herodian is an eyewitness and the only contemporary historian whose work has come down to us in full. His point of view is all the more valuable because he is an outsider with respect to both court historiography, whose flattery he stigmatized, and to senatorial historians, represented mainly by Cassius Dio and by the biographies in the Historia Augusta. Nonetheless, Herodian has often been harshly criticized as a historian. This volume aims to shed light on the different areas and themes in which his historical work moves - literary technique, political lexicon, religious conception, geographical space, economic, political, cultural and military themes - to better understand the relevance of his historiographical approach and his historical thought.
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Mainz, June 12-15, 2019)
Volume Editors: Marietta Horster and Nikolas Hächler
This volume presents the results of the fourteenth workshop of the international network 'Impact of Empire'. It focuses on the ways in which Rome's dominance influenced, changed, and created landscapes, and examines in which ways (Roman) landscapes were narrated and semantically represented. To assess the impact of Rome on landscapes, some of the twenty contributions in this volume analyse functions and implications of newly created infrastructure. Others focus on the consequences of colonisation processes, settlement structures, regional divisions, and legal qualifications of land. Lastly, some contributions consider written and pictorial representations and their effects. In doing so, the volume offers new insights into the notion of ‘Roman landscapes’ and examines their significance for the functioning of the Roman empire.
Late Antique Responses to the Arab Conquests is a showcase of new discoveries in an exciting and rapidly developing field: the study of the transition from Late Antiquity to Early Islam. The contributors to this volume engage with previously neglected sources, such as Arabic rock inscriptions, papyri and Byzantine archaeological remains. They also apply new interpretative methods to the literary tradition, reading the Qur’an as a late antique text, using Arabic poetry as a source to study the gestation of an Arab identity, and extracting settlement patterns of the Arabian colonizers in order to explain regional processes of Arabicization and Islamization. This volume shows how the Arab conquests changed both the Arabian conquerors and the conquered.
We tend to think of numbers as inherently objective and precise. Yet the diverse ways in which ancient Greeks used numbers illustrates that counting is actually shaped by context-specific and culturally-dependent choices: what should be counted and how, who should count, and how should the results be shared? This volume is the first to focus on the generation and use of numbers in the polis to quantify, communicate and persuade. Its papers demonstrate the rich insights that can be gained into ancient Greek societies by reappraising seemingly straightforward examples of quantification as reflections of daily life and cultural understandings.