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Series Editors: David Carey Jr. and Renata Keller
Critical Latin America explores the historical and contemporary currents, connections, and conflicts of Latin Americans’ ideas and identities. The editors are particularly interested in the intersections of identities—gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class—and such public and private fora as politics, culture, art, religion, and family. Interdisciplinary in nature, the series also examines how forces such as migration, revolution, economic development, production of knowledge (particularly scientific and medical), social movements, education, and the environment shape the ideas, identities, and lived experiences of Latin Americans.

The editors invite proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions. Aiming to strike a balance between studies of the colonial and national eras, the series will consider manuscripts that deal with any period from the first European encounters in the Americas through the twenty-first century. The series embraces history on all scales, from the micro to the macro. The editors are as interested in relationships between people of African, Asian, European, and indigenous heritage in rural and urban communities as they are in the geopolitical relationships between nations and the transnational relationships of groups that defy borders.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

The editors of Critical Latin America prefer that contributors adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style.

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

In Lost-Time Injury Rates Rodrigo Finkelstein examines the information-intensive operations of recording and processing work-related accidents, diseases and fatalities carried out by Workers’ Compensation Systems. Situated within the field of political economy of information, this critique contributes to the understanding of how injury rates service a specific sector of the economy by constructing lost labour power for sale.
The central argument of this critique can be stated as follows: grounded in the capitalist mode of production, injury rates constitute an historical social relation that, by taking the semblance of inductive indicators, conceal specific capitalist relations that bring about the exchange and distribution of lost labour power among capitalists and wage labourers.
This edited volume critically examines the changing dynamics of multidimensional relations between China, Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and Asia in an emerging 'multiplex world'. It challenges both extremes of 'Sinophobia' and 'Sinophilia' by studying the real 'pragmatist' China.

This book, in a foreword, introduction and thirteen chapters, problematises what MENA and Asia means to China in the age of neoliberalism, explores what are the real or perceived pillars of Sino‒MENA-Asia relations, and sheds light on how MENA can benefit from its relations with China while keeping a clear distance from the harms of neoliberal authoritarianism.

Contributors are Mojtaba Mahdavi, Tugrul Keskin, Manochehr Dorraj, Sari Hanafi, Habibul Haque Khondker, Dara Conduit, Rigas Arvanitis, Saeed Shafqat, Jordi Quero Arias, Mahesh Ranjan Debata, Andrea Ghiselli, Mher D. Sahakyan, Michael McCall, Yossra M. Taha and Xiaoyue Li.
Editor-in-Chief: Zhi CHEN
This is a peer-reviewed, inclusive, non-Eurocentric, multi-disciplinary book series devoted to the interdisciplinary study of ancient civilizations from all continents.
- ALAC is fully-funded by the Research Centre For History and Culture (RCHC). All volumes are published under a CC BY-NC-ND license.
- Proposals must present original work and must have been submitted exclusively to ALAC. Both monographs and edited volumes are welcome.
- Submissions may regard any civilizations from any continents, developed between prehistory and the 15th century AD, that is, the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire.
- Submissions may regard any aspects of Antiquity: history, archaeology, art and architecture, philology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, etc.
- ALAC also considers studies of oral literature, such as proverbs and folklore, as well as field work on endangered languages, which represent the legacy of ancient traditions verbally transmitted from generation to generation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and full manuscripts by email to the Series Editors: Professor CHEN Zhi , Professor Carlotta Viti , and Dr WANG Xiang (Shawn Wang) .
Ethnographers spend a tremendous amount of time in the field, collecting all sorts of empirical material—but how do they turn their work into books or articles that people actually want to read? This concise, engaging guide will help academic writers at all levels to write better. Many ethnography textbooks focus more on the ‘ethno’ portion of our craft, and less on developing our ‘graph’ skills. Gullion fills that gap, helping ethnographers write compelling, authentic stories about their fieldwork. From putting the first few words on the page, to developing a plot line, to publishing, Writing Ethnography offers guidance for all stages of the writing process.
Series Editor: David Criekemans
Geopolitics and International Relations is a new and unique platform where a debate is possible between and within different schools of thought in geopolitics and international relations. It is conceived deliberately as a zone in which geopolitics and international relations can connect with each other rather than closing themselves off into existing publications in their respective fields. It also points to the increasing relevance of territorially embedded factors in the analysis of today’s international relations. In addition, the series is open to contributions from scholars working in other fields, such as historians, geographers, economists, political scientists, psychologists, specialists in international law, etc.

Today, more and more analysts are using the concept "geopolitics", but they do not always clearly define it (sometimes using it merely as a synonym for "power politics"). Geopolitics and International Relations presents a clear opportunity to connect, and it offers opportunities to academics, students, and practitioners to learn from each other, as well as more comprehensive analyses on the geopolitical challenges that affect many dimensions of the politics of today and tomorrow (security, economy, energy, environment, technology, and diplomacy & foreign policy).

Manuscripts should meet a minimum length requirement of 80,000 words.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Oblivionism
Open Access
Forgetting and Forgetfulness in Modern Science
Author: Oliver Dimbath
The book offers a fundamental view on the problem of forgetting in sociology in general and within sociology of knowledge. Furthermore it focuses – as a case study – on the field of modern science. With recourse to the term ‚oblivionism‘, originally introduced with ironic-critical intent by the german romance scholar Harald Weinrich, it analyzes the fundamental and multifaceted problem of the loss of knowledge in the field of science.
A declarative-reflective, an incorporated-practical and an objectified-technical memory motif is at the centre. These form the basis for the development of the three forms of forgetting that are also central to modern science: forgetfulness, wanting to forget and, ultimately, making one forget.