Considerations for Implementing Gaming Literacies in the Classroom
The possibilities of gaming for transformative and equity-driven instructional teaching practice are more robust than ever before. And yet, support for designing playful learning opportunities are too often not addressed or taught in professional development or teacher education programs. Considering the complex demands in public schools today and the niche pockets of extracurricular engagement in which youth find themselves, Playing with Teaching serves as a hands-on resource for teachers and teacher educators. Particularly focused on how games – both digital and non-digital – can shape unique learning and literacy experiences for young people today, this book’s chapters look at numerous examples that educators can bring into their classrooms today.

By exploring how teachers can support literacy practices through gaming, this volume provides specific strategies for heightening literacy learning and playful experiences in classrooms. The classroom examples of gameful teaching described in each chapter, not only provide practical examples of games and learning, but offer critical perspectives on why games in literacy classrooms matter today.

Through depictions of cutting-edge of powerful and playful pedagogy, this book is not a how-to manual. Rather, Playing with Teaching fills a much-needed space demonstrating how games are applied in classrooms today. It is an invitation to reimagine classrooms as spaces to newly investigate playful approaches to teaching and learning with adolescents. Roll the dice and give playful literacy instruction a try.

Contributors are: Jill Bidenwald, Jennifer S. Dail, Elizabeth DeBoeser, Antero Garcia, Kip Glazer, Emily Howell, Lindy L. Johnson, Rachel Kaminski Sanders, Jon Ostenson, Chad Sansing, and Shelbie Witte.
Editors: Nagla Ali and Myint Swe Khine
Three dimensional or 3D printing technology is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Currently, low cost and affordable 3D printers enable teachers, schools, and higher education institutions to make 3D printing a part of the curriculum. Integrating 3D printing into the curriculum provides an opportunity for students to collaboratively discuss, design, and create 3D objects. The literature reveals that there are numerous advantages of integrating 3D printing into teaching and learning. Educators recommend that 3D printing should be introduced to the students at a young age to teach STEM concepts, develop creativity and engage in team work – essential skills for the 21st century work force.

This edited volume documents recent attempts to integrate 3D printing into the curriculum in schools and universities and research on its efficacies and usefulness from the practitioners' perspectives. It unveils the exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, theoretical and practical aspects of 3D printing in teaching and learning.

Contributors are: Waleed K. Ahmed, Issah M. Alhamad, Hayder Z. Ali, Nagla Ali, Hamad AlJassmi,Jason Beach, Jennifer Buckingham, Michael Buckingham, Dean Cairns, Manisha Dayal, Muhammet Demirbilek, Yujiro Fujiwara, Anneliese Hulme, Myint Swe Khine, Lee Kenneth Jones, Jennifer Loy, Kehui Luo, Elena Novak, James I. Novak, Joshua Pearce, Dorothy Belle Poli, Chelsea Schelly, Min Jeong Song, Sylvia Stavridi, Lisa Stoneman, Goran Štrkalj, Mirjana Štrkalj, Pamela Sullivan, Jeremy Wendt, Stephanie Wendt, and Sonya Wisdom.
This volume of the World of Science Education gathers contributions from Latin American science education researchers covering a variety of topics that will be of interest to educators and researchers all around the world. The volume provides an overview of research in Latin America, and most of the chapters report findings from studies seldom available for Anglophone readers. They bring new perspectives, thus, to topics such as science teaching and learning; discourse analysis and argumentation in science education; history, philosophy and sociology of science in science teaching; and science education in non-formal settings. As the Latin American academic communities devoted to science education have been thriving for the last four decades, the volume brings an opportunity for researchers from other regions to get acquainted with the developments of their educational research. This will bring contributions to scholarly production in science education as well as to teacher education and teaching proposals to be implemented in the classroom.

Medicine has always been regarded as one of the most significant disciplines, grounded in a humanistic approach, due to its ultimate exposure and connection with people as ‘patients’ and hence a holistic understanding of the patient as ‘human’ is fundamental. In our potentially dangerous times, the instrumental, technical and fragmented ways of seeing knowledge tend to permeate most disciplines, including medicine. This may result in individuals becoming alienated with the ‘self’ as potential doctors, with the discipline and with patients through the monologic discourse of academia or clinics. This article examines this (in)visible global issue in the specific context of Iran, where bilingual medical education adds another level of complexity in dialogic ‘seeing’ of self, knowledge and patients. Grounded in Bakhtin’s theory of dialogue and critical literacy approach to language and literacy, this article explores the affordances of a pedagogical intervention at an Iranian university. This offers diverse avenues for constructing a holistic medical knowledge in the process of becoming a professional through narrative medicine, clinical scenarios, evidence-based medicine and personal experiences. Selected stories of participants’ ontological and epistemological transformations, in their process of ideological becoming, are offered to argue for the urgency of dialogic ways of ‘seeing’ in potentially dangerous times.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

Following a sociocultural perspective on learning, we report an analysis of meaning making about Darwinist explanations during discursive interactions in biology classrooms. To perform this analysis, we used a conceptual profile of adaptation in combination with a framework developed by Mortimer and Scott (2003) as a tool for analyzing classroom discourse, grounded on the dialogic theory of language of the Bakhtin circle and Vygotsky’s account of the development of higher mental functions. We discuss how the results obtained through this kind of analysis make it possible to characterize in semantic, linguistic, and social terms the relationship between discursive interactions and meaning making in the science classroom, and bring contributions to the planning of teaching interventions, especially, to the management of communicative approaches and language use in the interactions between teachers and students, as a way of increasing the likelihood that students appropriate the school science perspective. An important asset in the science classroom is to explicitly approach the meaning of different ways of speaking in order to support the students in the task of becoming aware of the distinctive features of everyday and school science social languages. In the case of teaching about the theory of evolution by natural selection, it is important that the students are stimulated to master ways of speaking closer to the variational perspective zone in our adaptation profile model. This can be done, for instance, by promoting their construction of utterances in which the organisms appear as objects of the evolutionary process instead of utterances in which the organisms appear as subjects of evolutionary change; and by reconstructing narratives produced in a language characterized by personification and anthropomorfization to talk about evolution processes into narratives of chains of events without clear protagonist agents, which result in the evolution of populations of organisms.

In: Science Education Research in Latin America

Abstract

Contributions from philosophy, sociology of science and cognitive psychology of science, and cognitive psychology are presented to justify the urge to develop reasoning and argumentation abilities for science learning. Some indicators are suggested to guide the teaching and learning processes in the different fields of scientific knowledge.

In: Science Education Research in Latin America

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the historical evolution of HPS in connection with science teaching and learning, the different lines of research that have developed over time, and some examples of teaching proposals – aimed at students, teachers and preservice science teachers – which were designed taking research results into account. Some special phases in this evolution are described: a first historic landmark that considered HPS as playing a limited role in the process of institutionalizing science education research in Brazil; the consolidation of the area during the 1980s; the application of HPS in the development of variations of the conceptual change model (Posner et al., 1982), giving special emphasis to other philosophers besides Kuhn and Lakatos; and a last phase of the institutionalization process of science education research in Brazil. A critical analysis of the present situation regarding the incorporation of HPS in science education is carried out, and some ideas are suggested in order to make progress along these lines.

In: Science Education Research in Latin America

Abstract

In this chapter, we will look into some of the diverse contributions that the history and philosophy of science can make to science education. Focus is on how these meta-sciences have been used to construct an educationally valuable image of what is usually called the ‘nature of science’, that is, an epistemological characterization of science as a product (scientific knowledge) and as a process (scientific activity). We deal with a didactical characterization of the nature of the scientific enterprise that conceptualizes science-in-the-making from a perspective that resorts to the idea of evidence. From this point of view, we claim that science can be seen as the collection, transformation and use of evidence to model the natural world. We direct the inquiry-based characterization of science towards the education of pre- and in-service science teachers. One of the main aims of the chapter is to provide a comprehensive picture of recent Latin American scholarship devoted to this issue within the field of didactics of science (i.e. science education as an academic discipline).

In: Science Education Research in Latin America
In: Science Education Research in Latin America
The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education
Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.