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Rechtsethische Aufsätze zu Krieg und Frieden, Freiheit und Schuld, Leben und Tod
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Grund- und damit Ewigkeitsfragen des Rechts sind der Gegenstand dieser Aufsätze. Sie öffnen weitläufige Flanken zur Philosophie, insbesondere zur Ethik und zur politischen Philosophie, aber auch zu anderen philosophischen Sphären wie der Philosophie des Geistes und der Metaphysik.
Im ersten Teil geht es um Grenzen der Rechtfertigung tödlicher Gewalt, die Staaten ausüben: in Kriegen gegeneinander, aber in Ausnahmelagen des innerstaatlichen Notstands auch gegen die eigenen Bürger.
Eine legitime Form staatlicher Gewalt ist das Strafrecht. Lässt sich sein Begriff aus archaischen Wurzeln von Rache und Vergeltung erhellen? Setzt strafrechtliche Schuld den freien Willen des Täters voraus? Darf ihn das Recht wegen besonders gravierender Verbrechen als „Feind“, statt als Bürger der Gesellschaft behandeln? Grundfragen, denen der zweite Teil nachgeht.
Der dritte Teil fragt nach den Grenzen zwischen Leben und Tod in der Medizin und nach Zuständigkeit wie Berechtigung, darüber zu entscheiden.
Spanish Jesuits such as Francisco Suárez (1548-1617), José de Acosta (1540-1600), Pedro de Ribadeneira (1526-1611) and Juan de Mariana (1536-1624) had a powerful impact on English thinkers of the magnitude of John Locke (1632-1704), Francis Bacon (1561-1626), Robert Persons (1546-1610), Algernon Sidney (1623-1683), and later, William Robertson (1721-1793), Thomas de Quincey (1785-1859) and Hilaire Belloc (1870-1953). An influence that was sometimes hidden and always controversial.
This work highlights the importance of this influence regarding thought on politics, law and natural rights. A constitutionalist understanding of political power, the recognition and promotion of innate rights and the necessary subjection of rulers to the law, all form part of the important legacy of these scholastic doctors for European intellectual heritage.

Contributors include: Rafael Alé Ruiz, Francisco T. Baciero Ruiz, Francisco Castilla Urbano, José Luis Cendejas Bueno, Alfonso Díaz Vera, Francisco Javier Gómez Díez, Cecilia Font de Villanueva, León M. Gómez Rivas, Fermín del Pino Díaz, Leopoldo J. Prieto López, Daniel Schwartz, Lorena Velasco Guerrero, and María Idoya Zorroza Huarte.
Volume Editors: , , and
This volume offers original research on religious freedom from around the globe. Individual chapters address the issues related to defining and understanding the concept of religious freedom and incorporate sociological thinking into interdisciplinary analysis of this topic. By interpreting legal cases, analyzing cross-national data, interviewing policy-makers, and reviewing policy-papers concerning religious freedom, the authors highlight the necessity of sociology engaging with other disciplines in this type of research. By applying theories of religious pluralism, secularity, secularization, judicialization of religion, “lived religion”, total institutions, and others, this volume contributes theoretical perspectives, sociological concepts and empirical analyses that highlight the development of religious freedom as an area of study in the social sciences.
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Abstract

This chapter highlights the prospects of employing a policy mobilities perspective to advance the study of secular flows across different socio-political contexts. Originating in geography, the policy mobilities literature offers diverse theoretical and methodological tools to study the movement, mutation, and assemblages of policies across borders. Applying this framework to the sociology of religion, the chapter features two exploratory case studies. The first study examines the impact of France’s laïcité (state secularism) narrative on the Canadian province of Québec’s changing secular policy agendas in the past decade. The second study surveys the spread of “burqa bans”—laws against face covering in public spaces in five European Union countries (France, Belgium, Bulgaria, Austria, and Denmark). Qualitative data from these examples suggest that policymakers and other stakeholders routinely rely on other cases as a reference point, and interact with and learn from their external counterparts; yet rather than a simple transfer, they domestically mobilize such policies in novel configurations. The chapter contends that a policy mobilities outlook holds a vast potential to help the literature go beyond viewing religious freedoms as nationally isolated phenomena, and take into account the globally interconnected nature of historical and contemporary secularities.

In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches
In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches

Abstract

This chapter examines the interactive influences of endogenous cultural and structural factors, specifically religion, religious freedom, and Gender Inequality Index (gii) scores on level of commitment to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (cedaw) for 184 nation-state members of the United Nations and then, more specifically, for forty-five predominantly Muslim nations. The inclusion of religious freedom, religious repression, and secular repression in the analysis qualifies previous research results showing significant and persistent differences between predominantly Muslim nations and other nations on gender inequality measures and cedaw commitment. The analysis partially corroborates the earlier findings; Muslim majority nations reveal higher gii scores and lower cedaw commitment. However, adding religious freedom to the data categories shows high gii and low cedaw commitment to be most applicable to religiously repressive Muslim majority nations. Religiously free and secular repressive nations approximate all other United Nations member states’ patterns.

In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches
In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches

Abstract

Do individual positions toward religious truth-claims matter for perceptions of religious freedom? Relying on a survey of 1,035 university students from Northern Italy, this chapter conducts a micro-level analysis on the social perceptions of religious freedom (sprf). Using a five-dimensional measure of the sprf concept, we find that four out of five dimensions are widely accepted with the main differences occurring between Catholic youth and religious nones. The analysis of religious truth-claims suggested that pluralism, agnosticism, and interreligious perspectives were endorsed in the sample, and all truth-claims positions were selectively associated with religious freedom dimensions. The causal relationship between pluralistic truth-claims and the religious freedom measure is not depicted while atheism, compared to other truth-claim positions, is less supportive to the societal values of religious freedom. Moreover, positive views toward religious diversity have strong positive influences on the perceptions of religious freedom as individual autonomy, societal value, and a human rights principle while neglecting religious diversity leads to the disrespect to religious freedom as a human right.

In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches
Authors: and

Abstract

There is a substantial gap in the literature assessing the experiences and role of organizations with regard to the restrictions of religion. Exceptions exist, such as a shift toward institutional indexes of restrictions or explorations of the independent judiciary in maintaining promises of religious freedom as well as organizations as a potential actor in supporting religious rights. However, others have brushed upon the topic of organizations and freedoms, leaving room for a detailed understanding of the intersection of organizations and religious restrictions. We provide an overview of this intersection through a review of prior literature and original analyses. We begin with an overview of the extent of global regulation of religious organizations. Our second section finds the role of independent judiciaries and free and open elections in protecting religious freedoms. Third, we demonstrate that while international monitoring of religious freedoms is common, it has little impact on reducing state restrictions targeting religious organizations. Finally, we discuss the role of international social movement organizations in promoting global religious freedoms.

In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches
In: Religious Freedom: Social-Scientific Approaches