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Methodological Approaches to the Relationship Between Religious Art and Literature (1400-1700)
Intermediality, figurability, iconotext, visual exegesis… There is no shortage of new ways to approach the relationship between text and image. The exploration of these relationships has been greatly renewed in recent decades, benefiting from the contributions of anthropology, psychoanalysis and semiotics, alongside more traditional fields such as literature, art history and cultural history. Focusing on the religious field between 1400 and 1700, the essays gathered in this volume intend to contribute to the exploration of these relationships by placing a significant emphasis on the methodological dimension of their case studies. The editors have deliberately adopted the broadest possible position by considering the relations between the visual and the verbal, in order to emphasize the phenomenological point of view from which the objects studied are examined.

Contributors include Ralph Dekoninck, Anna Dlabačová, Grégory Ems, Ingrid Falque, Agnès Guiderdoni, Walter S. Melion, Kees Schepers, Paul J. Smith, and Elliott D. Wise.
Often considered as the first phenomenon of mass media in history, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of these supports by the partisans of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries.

The twelve contributors provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy of the Spanish Low Countries and underlines the mutually beneficial relationship between proponents of the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. It is therefore also an important contribution to our understanding of sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
An Iconological Analysis of the Relationships between Art, Science and Power
In Early Modern Thesis Prints in the Southern Netherlands, Gwendoline de Mûelenaere offers an account of the practice of producing illustrated thesis prints in the seventeenth-century Southern Low Countries. She argues that the evolution of the thesis print genre gave rise to the creation of a specific visual language combining efficiently various figurative registers of a historical and symbolic nature. The book offers a reflection on the representation of knowledge and its public recognition in the context of academic defenses.

Early Modern Thesis Prints makes a timely contribution to our understanding of early modern print culture and more specifically to the expanding field of study concerned with the role of visual materials in early modern thought.
In the early modern Iberian book world, as in the European book world more broadly, most works issuing from the presses contained some form of ornamentation. The nineteen contributions presented here cast light on these visual elements—on the production and ownership of printers’ materials, and on the frequency with which these materials were exchanged and shared. A third of all items printed in the early modern Iberian world carried no imprint at all; for these items, woodblocks and engravings can assist scholars seeking to identify their place of origin or their date of publication. As importantly, decoration and illustration in early print can also reveal much about the history of the graphic arts and evolving forms of cultural representation.
Volume Editors: Kirsty Bell and Philippe Kaenel
How has reproduction transformed works of art and literature, their dissemination and their reception? And how does it continue to do so? In what ways have our definitions and practices of reproduction changed over the last centuries thanks to new printing, photographic and digital techniques? These questions are timely. From the medieval copy to contemporary digital culture, including the rise of the printing press and engraving techniques in the Renaissance and the Ancien Régime, myriad modes of reproduction informed both our access to texts and images and our ways of reading, seeing, understanding, discovering and questioning the world.

Dans quelle mesure la reproduction transforme-t-elle les œuvres, leur diffusion et leur réception ? De quelles manières les conceptions et les usages de la reproduction ont-ils subi des transformations majeures au cours des derniers siècles avec la diffusion des pratiques d’impression, de la photographie et des techniques numériques ? Ces questions sont d’une actualité incontournable. De la copie médiévale à la culture numérique contemporaine, en passant par l’essor de l’imprimerie et les techniques de gravure à la Renaissance et sous l’Ancien Régime, les différents modes de reproduction informent non seulement nos accès aux textes et aux images, mais aussi nos manières de lire, de voir, de comprendre, découvrir et d’interroger le monde.

Abstract

Although in modern culture copies tend to be considered devoid of creativity and thus of value, it was not always the case; in the past, copies and the practice of copying were viewed favorably. It is only as authenticity and originality played an ever more determining role in Western culture, that their valence shifted towards the negative and even damning. Hergé’s Adventures of Tintin and in particular Le Sceptre d’Ottokar, an album contemporary with Walter Benjamin’s essay on mechanical reproduction, illustrate the anxiety that underlies the modern conception of the copy.

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In: Reproducing Images and Texts / La reproduction des images et des textes
Author: Juliet Simpson

Abstract

This article explores Baudelaire’s critical portrait of the illustrator Constantin Guys in Le Peintre de la vie moderne. A re-examination of this work by Baudelaire allows for new perspectives on Le Peintre de la vie moderne’s apparent binaries of modernity to reaction; romantic synthesis to alienation; form and ephemera; reproduction and alterity, offering new insights into its more complex, nuanced engagement with its central question about Constantin Guys’ artistic creation as a torchbearer not of alienation, but of a potent urban and spiritual art.

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In: Reproducing Images and Texts / La reproduction des images et des textes

Résumé

Notre article s’appuie sur la collection « Copyright, bande bleue », de Futuropolis. L’examen de trois de ses séries emblématiques et la comparaison avec leur publication originale dans la presse permettent de cerner les enjeux de la réédition de bande dessinée lors du passage du périodique au livre.

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In: Reproducing Images and Texts / La reproduction des images et des textes
Author: Laurence Danguy

Résumé

Pendant du Salon officiel apparu vers 1840, le Salon caricatural est réputé phénomène parisien. Ses différents avatars sont liés à la recomposition des champs de l’art et de la presse. Le Salon caricatural, dont les charges sont présumées inoffensives, reflèterait la réception populaire, ne créant qu’a minima de la valeur esthétique. Ces données et appréciations présentes dans la littérature scientifique sont contestées par l’étude du Nebelspalter zurichois entre 1877 et 1913. Si la dépendance vis-à-vis du modèle parisien est patente, le Salon caricatural y est non seulement acculturé mais le lieu d’un déplacement de valeurs sociale et esthétique.

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In: Reproducing Images and Texts / La reproduction des images et des textes

Résumé

Les enjeux symboliques, juridiques et économiques liés à la reproduction dépendent pour une large part de la présence ou de l’absence d’un système notationnel. Alors que l’identité d’une œuvre littéraire est maintenue à travers ses copies manuscrites et ses exemplaires imprimés aussi longtemps que le code notationnel du texte original n’est pas altéré, la question de la reproduction a été logée au cœur même de la production artistique par la théorie longtemps régnante de l’imitation. Avec un degré de « fidélité » que la reproduction-copie par le dessin ne peut atteindre, la photographie applique aux œuvres d’art le même traitement qu’à tout autre sorte d’objet : non seulement elle aura élargi la famille des images, mais elle est devenue le paradigme de l’image.

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In: Reproducing Images and Texts / La reproduction des images et des textes