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Editor: Alan Kim
For six centuries, Plato has held German philosophy in his grip. Brill’s Companion to German Platonism examines how German thinkers have interpreted Plato and how in turn he has decisively influenced their thought. Under the editorship of Alan Kim, this companion gathers the work of scholars from four continents, writing on figures from Cusanus and Leibniz to Husserl and Heidegger. Taken together, their contributions reveal a characteristic pattern of “transcendental” interpretations of the mind’s relation to the Platonic Forms. In addition, the volume examines the importance that the dialogue form itself has assumed since the nineteenth century, with essays on Schleiermacher, the Tübingen School, and Gadamer. Brill’s Companion to German Platonism presents both Plato and his German interpreters in a fascinating new light.
Essays on Philosophy in the Eighteenth-Century Dutch Republic
This book is an attempt to assess the part played by philosophy in the eighteenth-century Dutch Enlightenment. Following Bayle’s death and the demise of the radical Enlightenment, Dutch philosophers soon embraced Newtonianism and by the second half of the century Wolffianism also started to spread among Dutch academics. Once the Republic started to crumble, Dutch enlightened discourse took a political turn, but with the exception of Frans Hemsterhuis, who chose to ignore the political crisis, it failed to produce original philosophers. By the end of the century, the majority of Dutch philosophers typically refused to embrace Kant’s transcendental project as well as his cosmopolitanism. Instead, early nineteenth-century Dutch professors of philosophy preferred to cultivate their joint admiration for the Ancients.
Essays on Hegel and Dialectics
Editor: Evgeni Pavlov
Evald Ilyenkov is a unique figure among the many interesting (and many dull) Soviet thinkers that have recently been introduced to English-speaking readers. Although a thoroughly academic philosopher (both in the choice of his subject matter and in his institutional locations), Ilyenkov’s ideas are presented in a manner that one does not often find among academics. Texts selected for this collection are not the only texts dedicated to Hegel and dialectics but they are representative of Ilyenkov’s main themes and interests. It is hoped that this collection will continue to draw interest to the Soviet engagement with Hegel and dialectics.
Marx’s Philosophy of Revolution in Permanence for Our Day, a selection of writings by the Marxist-Humanist philosopher and revolutionary Raya Dunayevskaya, brings out the contemporary urgency of Marx’s work as a philosophy of revolution in permanence. That dialectic permeates the totality of Marx’s body of ideas and activities. Major themes include Marx’s transformation of the Hegelian dialectic; the inseparability of Marx’s economics, humanism, and dialectic; the battle of ideas with post-Marx Marxism, beginning with Engels; Black liberation, internationalism, and women’s liberation; today’s burning question of the relationship between spontaneity, organization, and philosophy; the emergence of counter-revolution from within the revolution; and the problem of what happens after the revolution.
A Unified Approach to Moral Self-Consciousness
In Kant on Conscience Emre Kazim offers the first systematic treatment of Kant’s theory of conscience. Contrary to the scholarly consensus, Kazim argues that Kant’s various discussions of conscience - as practical reason, as a feeling, as a power, as a court, as judgement, as the voice of God, etc. - are philosophically coherent aspects of the same unified thing (‘Unity Thesis’). Through conceptual reconstruction and historical contextualisation of the primary texts, Kazim both presents Kant’s notion of conscience as it relates to his critical thought and philosophically evaluates the coherence of his various claims. In light of this, Kazim shows the central role that conscience plays in the understanding of Kantian ethics as a whole.
A Diachronic Interpretation of Prison Notebooks
Many scholars have recently shown great interest in a diachronic re-examination of Antonio Gramsci’s main theoretical-political categories in the Prison Notebooks. This method would uncover the origins and development of Gramsci’s concepts using the same method that Gramsci himself believed would allow us to grasp ‘the rhythm of thought’ in Marx. The present work embraces this perspective and puts it to work in two ways. Its first part analyzes the relation between structure and superstructure and the concepts of hegemony and the regulated society. Its second part extends the diachronic analysis to the conceptual pairings which represent alternatives to structure-superstructure, encompassing questions of political and cultural organisation as well as the relation between Gramsci and the major proponents of historical materialism (Marx, Engels, Lenin).

English translation of Il ritmo del pensiero: per una lettura diacronica dei «Quaderni del carcere» di Gramsci published by Bibliopolis, Naples (2011).
Querelles, disputes et controverses au siècle des Lumières
Simultanément sujet et objet de multiples débats et controverses, Jean-Jacques Rousseau n’a jamais cessé de produire et de susciter des différends, qu’ils soient personnels ou philosophiques. Auteur proprement en conflit avec son siècle, le Citoyen de Genève intervient dans l’arène publique en prenant partie dans d’importants débats idéologiques: ces querelles qui ont structuré le champ littéraire et politique sont l’objet de ce livre. On y analyse le rôle et la force de la polémique dans les œuvres de Rousseau. Prenant Les Confessions à rebours, cette étude met au jour un autre Rousseau : non la victime passive et innocente d’une réception hostile, mais un acteur majeur de ces conflits, c’est-à-dire un écrivain polémique.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau écrivain polémique focuses on the ways in which Rousseau’s career was constructed in a constant engagement with the practice of polemics and refutation in the fields of politics, religion, and philosophy. Known throughout Europe for his highly controversial writings and for the intense polemics to which they gave rise in the realm of public opinion, Jean-Jacques Rousseau became in his lifetime the object of unprecedented public interest and scrutiny. The very public quarrels and controversies that accompanied the publication and reception of his works were instrumental in establishing a new role for the writer, making Rousseau an ideal case study for this major shift in the relationship between writers and a rapidly changing and newly dynamic public sphere.
In: The Rhythm of Thought in Gramsci
In: Jean-Jacques Rousseau écrivain polémique
In: The Rhythm of Thought in Gramsci