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Edited by Michael J. Thompson

Georg Lukács was one of the most important intellectuals and philosophers of the 20th century. His last great work was an systematic social ontology that was an attempt to ground an ethical and critical form of Marxism. This work has only now begun to attract the interest of critical theorists and philosophers intent on reconstructing a critical theory of society as well as a more sophisticated framework for Marxian philosophy. This collection of essays explores the concept of critical social ontology as it was outlined by Georg Lukács and the ways that his ideas can help us construct a more grounded and socially relevant form of social critique.
This work will of special interest to social, moral and political philosophers as well as those who study critical theory, social theory and Marxism. It is also of interest to those working within the area of social ontology.

Contributors include: Mario Duayer, Andreas Giesbert, Christoph Henning, Antonino Infranca, Reha Kadakal, Endre Kiss, Michael Morris, Michalis Skomvoulis, Matthew J. Smetona, Titus Stahl, Thomas Telios, Michael J. Thompson, Murillo van der Laan, Miguel Vedda, Claudius Vellay.

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Dan Swain

In None so Fit to Break the Chains Dan Swain offers an interpretation of Marx's ethics that foregrounds his commitment to working class self-emancipation and uses it as a guiding thread to interpret a number of different aspects of Marx’s ethical thought. This commitment is frequently overlooked in discussions of Marx's ethics, but it deeply influenced his criticism of capitalism, his approach towards an alternative, and his conception of his own role as activist and theorist.

Foregrounding self-emancipation offers new perspectives on various existing debates in the interpretation of Marx, such as the meanings of concepts like alienation, exploitation and utopianism, and can also offer insights into broader questions of the relationship between critical theory and practice.

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Edited by Lon Olson and Stuart Molloy

This volume offers diverse insights on how the practice of torture has impacted society and how we view human nature. After the Second World War, it was hoped that torture had been permanently vanquished among modern liberal states, and was only practiced by brutal totalitarian regimes. However, events after 9/11 revealed that the re-emergence of torture is an ever-present threat, even among leading democracies. Drawing from their knowledge of the humanities and social sciences, the contributors offer their expertise on the deleterious effects of torture and reveal that its trauma is interwoven into the fabric of modern society, requiring constant diligence to be rooted out and kept at bay. Contributors are William Fitzhugh Brundage, Federico Ciavattone, Noora Virjamo, Toni Koivulahti, Diana Medlicott, Stuart Molloy, Lon Olson, Martin Previsic, David Senesh and Hedi Viterbo.

Erotic Subjects and Outlaws

Sketching the Borders of Sexual Citizenship

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Edited by Serena Petrella

This book examines the intricacies of emergent sexual citizenship. Designed for academics and broader audiences alike, the collection covers the theorization of sexual citizenship, the exploration of case studies in law, the relationship between sexual citizenship and bio-politics, and finally the erotic dissidence of sexual outlaws. The borders of sexual citizenship are traced, as authors investigate what it means to be ‘inside,’ as erotic subjects, or outside, as ‘sexual outlaws.’ The issues of inclusion and exclusion are approached through diverse methodological and analytical lenses: some articles are theoretical and philosophical, others are empirically based, presenting the findings of sociological and ethnographic research projects; some are textual analyses, of religious texts, film texts, and of legal discourse. Contributors are Abidemi Fasanmi, René Hirsch, Elene Lam, Jaclyn Lanthier, Todd G. Morrison, Nick J. Mulé, Elly-Jean Nielsen, Serena Petrella, Olivia Schuman and Deww Zhang.

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Edited by Martin Dabrowski, Judith Wolf and Karlies Abmeier

Editorial-board Arnd Küppers, Christian Müller, Joachim Wiemeyer and Marianne Heimbach-Steins

Umweltpolitik im Bereich von Energie, Boden und Wachstum gehört zu den Kernfragen nationaler und internationaler Politik. Wie können globale, gerechte und nachhaltige Lösungen aussehen?
In diesem Sammelband der Reihe „Sozialethik konkret“ wird die vielschichtige Problematik einer globalen und gerechten Umweltpolitik aufgegriffen und aus der Sicht unterschiedlicher wissenschaftlicher Disziplinen diskutiert. Im Diskurs der verschiedenen Wissenschaften sollen eine ausgewogene Beurteilung der Thematik erreicht, Vorschläge zur konkreten Gestaltung von Reformprozessen und konkrete Ausgestaltungen der Umweltpolitik erarbeitet und offene und weiterführende Fragestellungen identifiziert werden.

Intergenerational Equity

Environmental and Cultural Concerns

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Edited by Thomas Cottier, Shaheeza Lalani and Clarence Siziba

In Intergenerational Equity: Environmental and Cultural Concerns, the editors have produced an important, broad-based volume on intergenerational equity. The authors explore the principle of intergenerational equity in many dimensions, from the theoretical to the practical. While the primary focus is on intergenerational equity in the context of environmental resources and cultural heritage, the principle is also addressed in a broad array of other contexts. The final section of the volume considers intergenerational justice as it applies to indigenous peoples, genocide, migration, sovereign wealth funds and foreign investment. The chapters also provide a critical analysis of the issues and a consideration of the difficulties in implementing intergenerational equity.

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Volume-editor Thomas Cottier, Shaheeza Lalani and Clarence Siziba

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Volume-editor Thomas Cottier, Shaheeza Lalani and Clarence Siziba

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Otto Spijkers

Abstract

This article looks at ways in which the principle of intergenerational equity is applied in existing international and domestic water law. The international and domestic regulations and policies referred to in this article have been selected because they contain interesting ideas on how to give meaning to intergenerational equity in the framework of water law. They are to be considered best practices, and thus do not necessarily paint a representative picture of the current state of water law. Most water laws pay much less attention to intergenerational equity than the examples referred to in this paper. After a brief introduction to the principle of intergenerational equity in international (environmental) law, this paper zooms in on the role of the same principle in the general framework of international water law. It explores some examples of agreements regulating the shared use of a particular watercourse, and looks to examples of the principle’s application in domestic water law. Finally, the paper examines domestic policies which aim to apply the intergenerational equity principle to water law and offers a few general concluding remarks.