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The Lives and Legacy of Kim Sisŭp (1435–1493) offers an account of the most extraordinary figure of Korean literature and intellectual history. The present work narrates the fascinating story of a prodigious child, acclaimed poet, author of the first Korean novel, Buddhist monk, model subject, Confucian recluse and Daoist master. No other Chosŏn scholar or writer has been venerated in both Confucian shrines and Buddhist temples, had his works widely read in Tokugawa Japan and became an integral part of the North Korean literary canon.
The nine studies and further materials presented in this volume provide a detailed look on the various aspects of Kim Sisŭp’s life and work as well as a reflection of both traditional and modern narratives surrounding his legacy. Contributors are: Vladimír Glomb, Gregory N. Evon, Dennis Wuerthner, Barbara Wall, Kim Daeyeol, Miriam Löwensteinová, Anastasia A. Guryeva, Sixiang Wang, and Diana Yüksel.
Free access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

At the dawn of the 1990s, Thailand began to accept migrant workers from neighboring countries, namely Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia to work in labor sectors to meet with the high demand for manpower due to rapid economic development. Thirty years since the early batches of migrant workers entered the country, the number of migrant workers steadily increased and reached 3.9 million in 2018. Among this number, approximately 390,015 were children. Around thirty-five percent of these children were enrolled in Thai government schools. As the government school is a place where government policy and national ideology are manifested, this paper explores the forms and effects of education provided in government schools to children of migrant workers from Myanmar. These issues are examined through the lens of how nation-states integrate migrants into their societies.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

The research objective is to examine the similarities and differences of gender and working roles in Japanese and Thai television commercials. The research methodology focuses on content analysis. Seven hundred and sixty advertisements shown during 2016 in Japan and Thailand were analyzed. As a result, this comparative content analysis suggests a possible reversal from traditional patterns in the literature. Though the proportion of working women in Thailand is higher than the proportion in Japan, the proportions of working women in Japanese and Thai television commercials are insignificantly different. Moreover, this research result reveals the new appearance of non-stereotypical gender images in terms of the type of gender and working roles in commercials in these two Asian nations. These research findings support the supposition of a decrease in gender stereotyping in advertisements and suggest progress in stereotyped portrayals in advertising.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities
Author: Hui Ling Lim

Abstract

This paper aims to explore the relationship of mindfulness and motivation in self-transformation based on the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh. It discusses mind and meditation, the application and impact of mindfulness on body and mind, the Buddhist’s roots of motivation in meditation, the dynamics of motivation in mindfulness practice and Thich Nhat Hanh’s teachings on interbeing. He argues that it is not necessary to hold the original Buddhist intention with the goal to attain enlightenment when practicing mindfulness because mindfulness is not only a means but also an end in itself. My discussion will highlight this interconnectedness of mindfulness and motivation where one’s motivation can affect mindfulness and mindfulness practice can further shape one’s motivation. The continuous practice of mindfulness has the ability to develop one’s motivation to change one’s mental state and life perspective, as the transformation will occur when the mind becomes more aware and more insightful.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

In a multicultural-multilingual society, inclusion requires equitable access to quality education as stated – UN Sustainable Development Goals, target 4 (sdg4). In the deep south of Thailand, the majority Muslim population speak Patani Malay in daily life, making language identity an issue as it is not recognized for official use. Students are required to study in Thai and as a result have the lowest academic achievement in the country. Furthermore, parents and the community have no confidence in government schools and some even fear that education is being used to destroy their ethnic identity. This paper presents a participatory action research, a Patani Malay-Thai mother tongue-based bi/multilingual education programme, implemented in Thailand’s Deep South as a case study of academic efforts to create social inclusion. Policies and practices will be discussed and related to the reinforcement of ethnic identity, enhancing educational achievement and tightening social cohesion.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

This article offers theoretical and ethnographic perspectives on language ideology and autonym preference among bi-lingual urban Malays in Pattani’s provincial capital. The first of its two substantive sections presents a concise summary of the most relevant insights provided by linguistic anthropologists and sociolinguists who have written on language ideology and the role of language in identity formation. The primary purpose of the second section is to explore the heuristic utility of these theoretical insights on a range of ethnographic vignettes where a range of language-related issues have historically represented a significant source of mistrust between the local Malay majority and Bangkok. We develop insights provided by interactionalist perspectives on language and identity formation to Malay identity formation, specifically which autonyms are strategically adopted.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

This research delved into the specificity of Japanese cartoons and superhero tv series during the 80s-90s based on two questions; how their content familiarized the Thai audience with the culture of Japan and what impact they have delivered. Content analysis, audience analysis, and document research were used as the research methodology. The discovery suggested that Japanese cartoons and superhero tv series were culturally powerful. Their presentation of the local culture was comprehensible, repetitive, and joyous, causing the audience to be connected to the culture of Japan with ease. Each cartoon and superhero tv series also possessed high entertainment quality that drew mass attention from the Thai audience as well as enlarging the consumption scale. This came to light as a result of some creative techniques employed by their creators and, therefore, engendered some significant impacts as explained in the theory of soft power.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities
At a lonely place, in a remote hermitage somewhere in the Himālaya, the god Śiva is teaching Tantric worship to his humiliated sons, who want to regain their divine status: “You should worship the goddess Mahāmāyā Kālikā”. Remarkable are his ‘talks’ about preliminary rituals, mudrās, and animal as well as human sacrifice. The Tantric Teachings form the inner core of the Kālikā Purāna, i.e. ‘Old Stories about Kālikā’, composed by a learned Brāhmin about a thousand years ago in Kāmarūpa (Assam). Careful listening to the text has been my first priority when presenting the relevant passages in text and translation.
In: Tantric Teachings of the Kālikā Purāṇa