Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,600 items for :

  • Languages of Continental South-East Asia x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Editors / Translators: David Holm and Yuanyao Meng
This is an annotated edition of a traditional song text, written in the Zhuang character script. The Brigands’ Song is part of a living tradition, sung antiphonally by two male and two female singers. The song is probably unique in presenting the experiences of ordinary men and women during wartime in pre-modern China. The narrative relates how the men are sent off to war, fighting as native troops on behalf of the Chinese imperial armies. The song dates from the Ming dynasty and touches on many topics of historical significance, such as the use of firearms and other operational details.

Abstract

The received view that the differences among Sinitic languages are mostly limited to their phonology and, to a lesser extent, to the lexicon (Chao 1968), has been challenged in recent years, with plenty of studies showing that Chinese ‘dialects’ are, indeed, diverse at all levels, including morphology and (morpho-)syntax (see Chappell 2015a for an overview). Some major differences within the Sinitic branch follow areal patterns, in which contact is often claimed to play a crucial role. In our contribution, we would like to propose that there is an area within Northern China, spread over the Shanxi, Henan, Hebei, and Shandong provinces, in which we find Sinitic languages possessing some features not seen (or, at least, uncommon) elsewhere. These include: 1. reduced/nonconcatenative morphology (see Arcodia 2013, 2015; Lamarre 2015); 2. object markers based on speech act verbs (see Chappell 2013); and 3. structural particles with an l-initial (see Chen A. 2013, a.o.). Based on our own survey of a sample of 96 dialects, we shall discuss the distribution of these features, as well as their possible origins.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale

Abstract

There has been some progress in the reconstruction of Proto-Kuki-Chin (PKC), but, due to the previous lack of data from languages reflecting all the Kuki-Chin sub-groups, the available reconstructions merit fresh consideration. On the basis of new data of Kuki-Chin (KC) languages, this paper proposes revisions to some of the reconstructions put forward by VanBik (2009). This paper particularly discusses PKC numerals in detail, especially the reconstruction of the numerals with prefixes.

Open Access
In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale
Author: Chinfa LIEN

Abstract

Drawing on the data in early Southern Min play scripts, this paper explores temporal expressions—in particular temporal adverbials—which bear on the issues of their grammatical categories and syntactic placement. Considerable space is devoted to clarifying two kinds of distinctions of temporal adverbials on the strength of attested examples. A distinction is made between deictic temporal adverbials and determiner phrase-derived temporal adverbials. Similarly, durative adverbials are shown to behave differently from punctual adverbials. Finally, I argue that the metonymic semantic shift of deictic temporal adverbials denoting tomorrow and yesterday/the day before yesterday is grounded in the constraint of proximity to the deictic center of today in connection with the backdrop of diachronic development.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale

Abstract

The Khotanese masculine substantive saña- ‘artifice, expedient, means, method’ cannot be a loanword from the Gāndhārī feminine saṃña ‘perception, idea’ (< Sanskrit saṃjñā-), as has been recently suggested. Bilingual evidence for its meaning, its metrical use, and the contexts where it occurs show unambiguously that it differs formally and semantically from the Khotanese feminine saṃñā- ‘idea, notion, perception, etc.’, the actual loanword from Gāndhārī saṃña. Since the meaning of Tocharian B sāñ, ṣāñ and A ṣāñ ‘expedient, means’ agrees with that of Khotanese saña- ‘artifice etc.’, the old view should not be abandoned that the latter is a genuine Khotanese word < Iranian *sćandi̯a- (to the root *sćand- ‘to appear, seem (good)’) and is the source of the corresponding loanwords in Tocharian.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

Reviewing the catalogue of the Paṇḍit Collection in the Royal Library at Copenhagen, which was (as far as the colophons allow this conclusion) mainly collected from Western India and from Benares during the 16th through 19th centuries, offers also an opportunity for a preliminary study of some aspects of colophons, particularly the problems incurred in fully understanding the dates and their vocabulary. Moreover, concluding verses attached by copyists at the end of their manuscripts were assembled from the catalogue.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
In: Indo-Iranian Journal
In: Indo-Iranian Journal