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Brazil in the Work of Lorenzo Dow Turner, E. Franklin Frazier and Frances and Melville Herskovits, 1935-1967
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This book offers a new perspective on the making of Afro-Brazilian, African-American and African studies through the interrelated trajectory of E. Franklin Frazier, Lorenzo Dow Turner, Frances and Melville Herskovits in Brazil. The book compares the style, network and agenda of these different and yet somehow converging scholars, and relates them to the Brazilian intellectual context, especially Bahia, which showed in those days much less density and organization than the US equivalent. It is therefore a double comparison: between four Americans and between Americans and scholars based in Brazil.
In this book, Marileen La Haije offers a thorough and innovative analysis of the intersections between madness and trauma in recent Central American literature on (post)war. A central argument of her study is that these literary texts challenge the taboo of madness in Latin American contexts of memory, by showing that talking about madness does not necessarily lead to stigmatizing victims of political violence or disqualifying their stories about traumatic experiences. La Haije highlights the importance of including madness on the research agenda in the field of memory studies in Latin America.

En este libro, Marileen La Haije presenta un análisis detallado e innovador de las intersecciones entre locura y trauma en la ficción centroamericana reciente sobre la (pos)guerra. Un argumento central de su estudio es que estos textos literarios desafían el tabú de la locura en los contextos de memoria latinoamericanos, enseñándonos que hablar de locura no necesariamente implica estigmatizar a víctimas de violencia política o descalificar sus relatos sobre experiencias traumáticas. La Haije destaca la importancia de incluir la locura como tema de investigación en los estudios sobre la memoria en Latinoamérica.
In Agrarian History of the Cuban Revolution, the Brazilian historian Joana Salém Vasconcelos presents in clear language the complicate challenge of overcoming Latin America’s underdevelopment condition, even though a revolutionary process. Based on diverse historical sources, she demonstrates why the sugar plantation economic structure in Cuba was not entirely changed by the 1959’s Revolution.

The author narrates in detail the three dimensions of Cuban agrarian transformation during the decisive 1960s — the land tenure system, the crop regime, and the labour regime —, and its social and political actors. She explains the paths and detours of Cuban agrarian policies, contextualized in a labour-intensive economy that needs desperately to increase productivity and, at the same time, promised widely to emancipate workers from labour exploitation. Cuban agrarian and economic contradictions are well-synthetized with the concept of Peripheral Socialism.
What were the changes in the international position of the Brazilian state during the Lula and Cardoso administrations? How were the classes and class fractions represented? These are the questions that Tatiana Berringer's work seeks to answer. Using the theoretical instruments of the Marxist Nicos Poulantzas, the book identifies the class interests that directed the international action of the Brazilian state. With notable originality, the text presents, theoretically and empirically, a truly consistent Marxist analysis of Brazilian foreign policy, as well as a rich interpretation of the class struggle in current Brazilian politics. The author offers the reader her reflections on the political crisis of 2016 and the foreign policy of the Dilma, Temer, and Bolsonaro governments.
In this latest work by the prolific Mexican theorist Adrián Sotelo Valencia, the COVID-19 pandemic is shown to have merely exacerbated the profound world capitalist crisis rooted in the 1970s structural exhaustion of the third industrial revolution. Sotelo explains how the current 4.0 revolution whose articulating axis is the development and expansion of artificial intelligence, Big Data, algorithms, 3D printing, the Internet of Things, and digital platforms constitutes a global strategy of capital and the state aimed at detaining the global capitalist crisis. The Digital Revolution heralds a new international division of labour with severe repercussions for labour, especially in dependent countries like Mexico. The foreword by Andrés Piqueras of the Universidad Jaume I de Castellón underlines the urgency to heed this insightful analysis.
In The Criminalization of Democratic Politics in the Global South, Zaffaroni, Caamaño and Vegh Weis offer an account of the misuse of the law to criminalize progressive political leaders in Latin America. Indeed, more and more popular political leaders in the region end up imprisoned or persecuted, even while in power. Inacio Lula da Silva, former President of Brazil and author of the preface, is the quintaessential case of this worrying process.

Despite the centrality of this juridical-political phenomenon in Latin America, it is hardly known to the Anglo-Saxon public. This book seeks to fill this gap. In an accessible style, the authors deconstruct the judicial language and the main problematics of lawfare, calling attention to the fact that it might end up demolishing the rule of law for the sake of fostering the most cruel forms of neoliberalism.
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The Shifting Ground of Globalization: Labor and Mineral Extraction at Vale S.A. describes the transformation of the formerly state-owned Brazilian mining company into a Transnational Corporation, global leader in iron ore and nickel extraction. Through ethnographic research in Brazil and Canada, in places as different as Carajás, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, and Sudbury, in northern Ontario, Thiago Aguiar dialogues with the theories of global capitalism and takes the case of the largest Latin American company as a telling example of the integration of the Brazilian economy into capitalist globalization and its consequences for workers, communities, and the environment in the first decades of the twenty-first century – when many celebrated the BRICS as an alternative to neoliberal globalization.