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Abstract

The author offers a grateful reply to his three respondents before clarifying a few matters and responding to queries. Nothing emerges that would require modifications to the main arguments of the book.

In: Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus

Abstract

This article reviews Tucker Ferda’s recent book on the Galilean Crisis Theory, a scholarly theory that holds that Jesus encountered hostility and rejection in Galilee, which spurred significant changes in his mission, including his rather abrupt transition to Jerusalem. This lucid and deftly executed study charts the development of this scholarly theory, before offering its own assessment of Jesus’ mission and its success. With his perceptive assessment of early scholarship, Ferda makes an important contribution to the on-going meta-critical work in historical Jesus studies.

In: Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus

Abstract

This article explores the historiographical consequences of depending on Markan chronology to reconstruct Jesus’s mission. Mark highlights a “Galilean crisis” as well as the scene in the temple courts (Mk 11:18) as twinned moments of dramatic reversal (peripeteia) that serve to drive his story home to its conclusion, connecting Jesus’s Jewish mission with his Roman death. Analyzing Jesus, the Gospels, and the Galilean Crisis with Mark’s literary deployment of peripeteia in mind, the essay then raises several questions about Ferda’s reconstruction of the reception of Jesus’s message among his Galilean hearers. Jerusalem, not the Galilee, emerges as the true site of “crisis.” Jesus’s popularity among Jews, not a rejection by them, explains most directly Pilate’s decision to neutralize Jesus. Were it not for the narrative shaping of Mark’s story, would we have any reason to presuppose a “Galilean crisis” at all?

In: Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus
Motion towards Maximal Proximity and Higher Status
Author: Oscar Jiménez
Oscar E. Jiménez opens up the multi-dimensional implications of Ephesians 2:11-22 for narrative and theological analysis, demonstrating that each metaphor in the text blends and creates a single, complex narrative. Concentric spatial places construct the text’s landscape on which the Gentiles move, each place representing increasing intimacy and familiarity through national, familial, architectural, and cultic images. Christ is the vehicle of that motion, and also the agent, breaking down walls and abolishing enmity, and ultimately building the structure as both builder and cornerstone. This will be an important book for New Testament scholars and scholars interested in the use of linguistics in Biblical studies, in particular literary and narrative analysis to the New Testament epistles.
In: Metaphors in the Narrative of Ephesians 2:11-22
In: Metaphors in the Narrative of Ephesians 2:11-22
In: Metaphors in the Narrative of Ephesians 2:11-22
In: Metaphors in the Narrative of Ephesians 2:11-22
In: Metaphors in the Narrative of Ephesians 2:11-22
In: Metaphors in the Narrative of Ephesians 2:11-22