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Mill’s Principle of Utility: Origins, Proof, and Implications is a defense of John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism with a particular emphasis on his proof of the principle of utility. Supplemented by a comprehensive historical background as well as salient philosophical assumptions and implications, its primary contribution is an analysis, interpretation, and defense of the controversial proof, which has yet to attract a scholarly consensus on how it works and whether it succeeds. The overarching aim of the book is the vindication of Mill’s reasoning in the proof and the restoration of his reputation as one of the clearest thinkers of his time.
Anthropology, Epistemology, Ethics, Space
Volume Editors: Asis De and Alessandro Vescovi
An Indian Bengali by birth, Amitav Ghosh has established himself as a major voice in what is often called world literature, addressing issues such as the post-colonial and neo-colonial predicaments, the plight of the subalterns, the origin of globalisation and capitalism, and lately ecology and migration. The volume is therefore divided according to the four domains that lie at the heart of Ghosh’s writing practice: anthropology, epistemology, ethics and space. In this volume, a number of scholars from all over the world have come together to shed new light on the works and poetics of Amitav Ghosh according to the epistemic frameworks that form the bedrock of his fiction.

Contributors: Safoora Arbab, Carlotta Beretta, Lucio De Capitani, Asis De, Lenka Filipova, Letizia Garofalo, Swapna Gopinath, Evelyne Hanquart-Turner, Sabine Lauret-Taft, Carol Leon, Kuldeep Mathur, Fiona Moolla, Sambit Panigrahi, Madhsumita Pati, Murari Prasad, Luca Raimondi, Pabitra Kumar Rana, Ilaria Rigoli, Sneharika Roy, John Thieme, Alessandro Vescovi.
In Nicholas of Cusa on the Trinitarian Structure of the Innate Criterion of Truth, Paula Pico Estrada offers an analysis of Nicholas of Cusa’s (1401-1464) unitrine conception of the human power of judgment, arguing that the innate criterion that guides human beings to their end is formed by a cognitive, an affective and a social dimension, and that it not only makes possible the systematization and evaluation of the cognitive experience but also enables morality.
Based on a closed reading of Cusanus’ philosophical treatises, the study deepens the understanding of Nicholas of Cusa’s epistemology, showing that his antropological conception closely integrates philosophy and theology.
A Semiotic Reinterpretation of The Great Ideas Movement for the 21st Century
This volume tests a hypothesis—philosophy and science are identical forms of behavioristic, organizational psychology: a psychological habit of wondering about causes of organizational existence, formation, and behaviour. Focusing attention on two universal and culturally influential great ideas—freedom and religion—this volume’s array of international scholars demonstrate that leading ancient and medieval philosophers did philosophy in this way. Also, well-known philosophers/scientists like Mortimer J. Adler and John N. Deely practiced philosophy this way. Doing so is precisely what made these philosophers uniquely capable of generating great ideas as motivational principles that dramatically alter cultures. In a nutshell, this work offers significant support for its historically and philosophically ground-breaking thesis.
Intellektuelle Tugenden und der Begriff des Wissens
Author: Steven Kindley
Diese erste deutschsprachige Monographie zur Tugenderkenntnistheorie gibt einen Überblick über die Debattenlandschaft und argumentiert für eine ihrer Varianten.
Der Fokus des Buchs liegt auf der Tugenderkenntnistheorie als Theorie von Wissen. Es führt voraussetzungslos in die Debatte ein, bietet ein einheitliches Definitionsschema für die so genannte aretaische Analyse von Wissen, klärt vor dem aristotelischen Hintergrund den Begriff der intellektuellen Tugend in unterschiedlichen Varianten und vergleicht die wichtigsten Strömungen innerhalb der aretaischen Analyse miteinander. Darüber hinaus liefert es eine Verteidigung einer bestimmten Variante der Tugenderkenntnistheorie – des Tugendreliabilismus –, in deren Rahmen der Begriff des Wissens mithilfe des Begriffs der kognitiven Fähigkeit definiert wird.

Abstract

This chapter chiefly aims to consider the philosophical problem of human will and freedom and their essential connection to religious, human nature as a masterpiece of creation from the perspectives of philosophy as a historical enterprise; i.e., philosophical anthropology; Mortimer J. Adler’s commonsense realist philosophical reflections on the nature of human freedom; and Karol Wojtyła’s analogous considerations of the same topics. Within this context, I will attempt to connect the problem of human freedom (strictly-speaking: free, perfect, unbending will) as a historical/philosophical Western enterprise to the concept of the human person as first formulated by Christian thinkers and philosophers of the first centuries and their successors.

In: The Great Ideas of Religion and Freedom

Abstract

Mortimer J. Adler maintained that religion is mainly an individual and historical, cultural activity, enterprise, through which people learn answers to Great Questions, while philosophy is chiefly an individual and historical, cultural enterprise, through which people enter into a Great Conversation about answers to such Great Questions. While Adler did not think that any one religion exists that provides ready-made, complete answers to the whole truth about God, human beings, and the world, this chapter defends the claim that, in Western Civilization, Christianity, and most precisely, historically, Catholicism tends to do this better than any other religion precisely because it is, and historically has been, the best friend, defender, of the Great Ideas, including those of Freedom and Religion, as the paradigms, chief measures, of human rationality at its best.

In: The Great Ideas of Religion and Freedom

Abstract

Living a purely human life, one not open to a dimension that transcends simply being human, betrays the proper definition of what being human means. This reveals itself in relation to the Great Ideas of freedom and religion. Religion conceived as the relationship between a human being and God requires an openness to a reality qualitatively different than purely human reality. And real freedom of choice is a condition sine qua non inclining human beings to transcend a purely human plane of living. This chapter focuses on the philosophical life and teachings of Czesław Martyniak about the Great Ideas of religion and freedom as motivational causes of personal transcendence and pursuit of perfection.

In: The Great Ideas of Religion and Freedom

Abstract

This chapter considers the human ability to exercise acts of faith, especially religious faith. For existential reasons, especially the prospect of death, human beings open up to the absolute being, forming a religious relationship, the development of which depends on individual persons’ free decisions. Such relationship may remain unfulfilled or it may become the reason for striving for fulfillment. This reality involves dramatic choices, which require human actions be transformed in a soteriological perspective. The way to achieve this is through religious actions such as prayer, sacrifice, or asceticism. Such actions have an individual character, yet their effects are manifest in various social dimensions. In this chapter, h these dimensions are considered.

In: The Great Ideas of Religion and Freedom
Author: Tomasz Duma

Abstract

Using some intuitions contained in Mortimer J. Adler’s teachings, this chapter presents reasons why the Great Ideas of Religion and Freedom are of crucial importance: for personally grasping human transcendence, and to show the main reasons that underlie some narrow, unrealistic, understandings of the aforementioned ideas—main effects of which are different forms of human enslavement. Better to elucidate Adler’s thought on these issues, among others, some investigations of Karol Wojtyła will be discussed, which seem to fully correspond with Adler’s, and, in many respects, complement them.

In: The Great Ideas of Religion and Freedom