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Volume Editor: P. Sean Morris
What was the state of the law and how states managed to fulfil their international legal obligations under the law of nations with respect to intellectual property protection? 13 contributors show how the transition of intellectual property from private rights holders and their non-state patrons evolves into state lawmaking. The book presents these transitions though international legal perspectives and the history of intellectual property rights in late modern societies in Europe, the United States, Asia and Colonial States in Africa.

Contributors are: Daniel Acquah, Ainee Adam, Louise Duncan, Johanna Gibson, Philip Johnson, Jyh-An Lee, Yangzi Li, P. Sean, Morris, Peter Munkacsi, Zvi Rosen, Devanshi Saxena, Johannes Thumfart, and Ester van Zimmeren.
Author: Tirza Meyer
In the late twentieth century, as the United Nations struggled to come up with a new legal system for the oceans, one woman saw the opportunity to promote radical new ideas of justice and internationalism. Ocean governance expert Elisabeth Mann Borgese (1918–2002) spent decades working with the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention. Throughout this sprawling series of global conferences, she navigated allegiances and enmities, intrigues and setbacks, fighting determinedly to develop a just ocean order.

Featuring extensive research and new interviews with Mann Borgese’s colleagues and family, this book explores timeless questions of justice and international collaboration and asks whether the extraordinary drive and vision of a single person can influence the course of international law.
In 1807, Napoleon Bonaparte created the Duchy of Warsaw from the Polish lands that had been ceded to France by Prussia. His Civil Code was enforced in the new Duchy too and, unlike the Catholic Church, it allowed the dissolution of marriage by divorce.

This book sheds new light on the application of Napoleonic divorce regulations in the Polish lands between 1808-1852. Unlike what has been argued so far, this book demonstrates that divorces were happening frequently in 19th century Poland and even with the same rate as in France. In addition to the analysis of the Napoleonic divorce law, the reader is provided with a fully comprehensive description of parties as well as courts and officials involved in divorce proceedings, their course and the grounds for divorce.
The Theology of God’s Power and Its Bearing on the Western Legal Tradition, 1100–1600
With a foreword by Diego Quaglioni

This book attempts to determine the degree to which the modern fate of the Western legal tradition depends on one of the most long-standing debates of the Middle Ages, the distinction between potentia Dei absoluta and ordinata (God’s absolute and ordered power). The mediaeval investigation into God’s attributes was originally concerned with the problem of divine almightiness. It underwent a slow but steady displacement from the territory of theology to the freshly emerging proceedings of legal analysis. Here, based on the distinction, late-mediaeval lawyers worked out a new terminology to define the extent of the power-holder’s authority. This effort would give rise, during the early modern era, to the gradual establishment of the legal-political framework represented by the concepts of the prince and sovereignty.
Volume Editor: Hans W. Blom
Often considered a secularizing force in the rise of the nation state, natural law was also invoked in defence of confessional states. The fourteen chapters in this volume show how religious and secularizing approaches to natural and biblical law interacted and combined as early modern states navigated the fallout from the Reformation. From this new perspective, the volume revisits questions of political legitimacy, civic and ecclesiastical authority, societal stability, conceptions of the common good, liberalism’s value pluralism (and its pretence), toleration and the lingering humanist project of determining “who are we” – issues that were as important then as they are now.

Contributors are: Dominique Bauer, Thomas Behme, Hans Blom, Jiří Chotaš, Alberto Clerici, Stefanie Ertz, Arthur Eyffinger, Heikki Haara, Mads Langballe Jensen, Adriana Luna-Fabritius, Denis Ramelet, József Simon, and Markus M. Totzeck.
Legal historians have analysed the characteristics of merchant guilds and nationes (i.e., associations of foreign merchants), as well as the political clout of merchants, including foreign ones. However, how the legal status of citizens related to the merchant class and how its contents were influenced by trade remains largely unclear. Did governments have a policy of citizenship that was tailored to commercial interests? Were foreign merchants belonging to a separate legal category of resident? If so, what defined this category? To what extent could different types of legal status and membership of communities or guilds overlap? And how did all this affect merchants’ identities, their self-images of belonging? This collection of essays provides anwers to these questions.

Contributors are: Sonja Breustedt, Pieter De Reu, Gijs Dreijer, Maurits den Hollander, Marco In’t Veld, Marta Lupi, Manon Moerman, Remko Mooi, Patrick Naaktgeboren, and Joost Possemiers.
Strathspey and the Regality of Grant (c. 1690-1748)
This book fills a significant gap in our current understanding of early modern Scottish history. It is the first systematic consideration of the workings of seigneurial courts of feudal lords in 18th century Scotland. For several hundred years, these courts were one of the main forums for justice across Europe. Until 1748, Scottish courts of barony and regality handled both criminal complaints and civil disputes; they made by-laws and levied taxes; they set wages and enforced morality. The 18th century was a time of epoch-defining events in Scotland, such as the Jacobite rebellions, and union with England. The amount of literature on this period of Scottish history is extensive; it is therefore remarkable that the story of these courts has been left untouched.