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Volume Editor:
This publication brings together current scholarship that focuses on the significance of performing arts heritage of royal courts in Southeast Asia. The contributors consist of both established and early-career researchers working on traditional performing arts in the region and abroad. The first volume, Pusaka as Documented Heritage, consists of historical case studies, contexts and developments of royal court traditions, particularly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The second volume, Pusaka as Performed Heritage, comprises chapters that problematise royal court traditions in the present century with case studies that examine the viability, adaptability and contemporary contexts for coexisting administrative structures.
A Multifaceted History of Khmer Rouge Crimes
Established in 1979 in the premises of the Khmer Rouge prison S-21 in Phnom Penh, Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum (TSGM) has had a turbulent history, mirroring Cambodia's social and political transformations. The book brings together academics and practitioners from multiple fields who offer novel perspectives and sources on the site and reflect on the challenges the institution has faced in the past and will face in the twenty-first century as an archive, heritage, and education site, especially with the coming of the post-justice era in the country.
Editor:
How did Asia come to be represented on European World maps? When and how did Asian Countries adopt a continental system for understanding the world? How did countries with disparate mapping traditions come to share a basic understanding and vision of the globe?
This series of essays organized into sections on Jesuit Circuits of Communication and Publication; Jesuit World Maps in Chinese; Reverberations of Matteo Ricci's Maps in East Asia; and Reflections on the Curation of Cartographic Knowledge, go a long way toward answering these questions about the shaping of our modern understandings of the world.
A Socio-cultural History of al-Bīrūnī’s Interpretations of Sāṅkhya and Yoga
Author:
The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.

Al-Bīrūnī (ca. 973-1050) was an innovative encyclopaedist thinker. He is particularly known to have investigated into India of his time. Yet, his life and the circumstances of his encounter with Indian languages, culture and sciences are still shrouded in mystery and legends.

This research brings to light elements of his intellectual journey based on well-grounded analysis so as to contextualise al-Bīrūnī’s work of transmission of Indian philosophies into Arabic. Thanks to a theoretical framework rooted in a multidisciplinary approach, including Translation Studies, it enables to comprehend the full scope of his work and to analyse deeply his motives and choices of interpretation.
A Critical Edition of a Seventeenth-century Volga-Turkī Source
Editor / Translator:
The Book of the Činggis Legend is a product of the steppe’s oral historiography, referring to events from the 13th−17th centuries, and presents the collective historical consciousness of the nomadic peoples of the Volga region's Turco-Tatar world.
The stories offer abundant information on the society, way of thinking and morals of the nomads, one of them can even be regarded as a kind of nomad “mirror of princes”. The other ones incorporate such crucial events in the Volga region as the islamization of nomad clans, epidemic, famine, the appearance of Halley’s Comet, the uprising of the Bashkirs, etc.
This book includes the first critical text edition of the source, the first full translation into English along with a glossary, historical comments, a huge apparatus and the three most complete facsimiles of the manuscript.
Author:
Sui-Wai Cheung’s study of the institutional history of copper coins in the Ming dynasty reveals how emperors and statesmen perceived and used the copper coins at their disposal. In this process, he uncovers the reality of the Sons of Heaven, showing that although Ming emperors seemed to have unlimited power, they could not afford the upkeep on their palace.

In this revealing history of Ming China, Cheung argues that especially after the breakdown of the household registration system, the aim of the Ming coinage system was to create a new source of income in order to maintain the emperor's domain in Beijing.