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The Realm of the Dead through the Voice of the Living
Author: Julia Hsieh
In Ancient Egyptian Letters to the Dead: the Realm of the Dead through the Voice of the Living Julia Hsieh investigates the beliefs and practices of communicating with the dead in ancient Egypt through close lexical semantic analysis of extant Letters. Hsieh shows how oral indicators, toponyms, and adverbs in these Letters signal a practice that was likely performed aloud in a tomb or necropolis, and how the senders of these Letters demonstrate a belief in the power and omniscience of their deceased relatives and enjoin them to fight malevolent entities and advocate on their behalf in the afterlife. These Letters reflect universals in beliefs and practices and how humankind, past and present, makes sense of existence beyond death.
The IOS Annual Volume 21: “Carrying a Torch to Distant Mountains”, brings forth cutting-edge studies devoted to a wide array of fields and disciplines of the Middle East. The three sections—the Ancient Near East, Semitic Languages and Linguistics, and Arabic Language and Literature—include sixteen articles. In the Ancient Near East section are studies devoted to Babylonian literature (Gabbay and Wasserman; Ayali-Darshan), history (Cohen and Torrecilla), and language (Zadok). The Semitic Languages and Linguistics section contains discussions about comparative Semitics—Egyptian and Modern South Arabic (Borg; Cerqueglini), Aramaic dialects (Khan; Stadel), Palestinian Arabic (Arnold; Procházka), and Tigre and Ethiosemitic languages (Voigt). The final section of Arabic Language and Literature is devoted to ʿArabiyya and its grammarians (Dror, Versteegh, Sheyhatovitch, Kasher, and Sadan).
Author: Céline Redard
This book is a multi-faceted study of the Srōš Drōn, comprising chapters 3 to 8 of the Yasna ceremony, the core ritual of the Zoroastrian religion. It provides a critical edition produced with the electronic tools of the project The Multimedia Yasna, and a study of the performative aspects of the Srōš Drōn both through the lens of the ritual directions and in comparison with the Drōn Yašt ceremony.
By analysing the Srōš Drōn both as a text attested in manuscripts and as a ritual performance, Céline Redard applies a new approach to unlock the meaning of these chapters of the Yasna.
Author: Brendan Haug

Abstract

Reviews of the historiography of irrigation regularly single out Karl August Wittfogel’s “hydraulic hypothesis” as a uniquely deleterious contribution to the study of ancient water management. His errors notwithstanding, this article argues that the ideological misshaping of Western scholarship on irrigation instead emerged from Egypt’s long colonial experience. First articulated in the Napoleonic Description de l’Égypte, the theory of a centralized, ancient Egyptian “hydraulic state” was crafted to justify French attempts to reshape Egypt’s irrigated landscape. British hydraulic engineers later received and refined this narrative during the British colonial period. Their popularizing discourse retrojected the technocratic character of modern irrigation into antiquity, defining the Egyptian “irrigation system” as a static and unchanging fusion of hydraulic expertise and state power. Widely disseminated in specialist and popular fora, this tendentious argument had become received wisdom by the beginning of the twentieth century and subtly shaped early Egyptological descriptions of irrigation in antiquity.

In: Journal of Egyptian History

Abstract

So far, it has not been possible to equate the name KꜢ-kꜢ.w of the second king Horus Rꜥ-nb(=i) of the Second Dynasty, written in a cartouche during the Ramesside Period, with a name attested at the time of this dynasty. Taking into account the theory advanced by Jochem Kahl that Horus Rꜥ-nb(=i) is the same ruler as Wng, it is possible to develop a sequence in Hieratic script which leads from Wng to KꜢ-kꜢ.w and is based on a misreading of an Egyptian scribe.

In: Journal of Egyptian History
Author: Laura Peirce

Abstract

The name rings depicted in the Theban tombs dating to the Eighteenth Dynasty are similar to those found on monumental topographical lists, though they seem to belong to a completely different motif: the Nine Bows. The Nine Bows are a list of nine lands considered to be the “enemies of Egypt,” a list that can be seen to fluctuate over time in parallel to the socio-political context. This article covers the phenomenon of name rings in the Theban tombs as a component of the “Royal Kiosk Icon,” examining their iconography and overall form to articulate typological differences for dating purposes, together with a brief discussion on their meaning and placement within the tombs themselves.

In: Journal of Egyptian History

Abstract

At the end of the Eighteenth and beginning of the Nineteenth Dynasty, several attestations of women named Tachat with the title wr.t ḫnr n jmn are possible to observe. These women all had a family background associated with service in the temple, mainly with the cult of Amun. This article brings these women together, and shows that the line of holders of this post in the Amun temple could imply the continuation of possible family ties among these female temple personnel. The family tree covers a rather long period of time for the women in question, who held this post in the cult of Amun even during the Amarna Period, demonstrating that some officials in Thebes were able to worship Amun even during the Amarna Period.

In: Journal of Egyptian History
Proceedings of an Eighth Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira
Volume Editor: Steven Fassberg
The 21 essays in this volume deal with the language and text of Hebrew corpora from the Second Temple period. They were originally presented at the Eighth International Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira, held in January 2016 in Jerusalem.
Most of the papers focus on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of First and Second Temple Hebrew. A few of the contributions are devoted primarily to the language of Ben Sira, Samaritan Hebrew, and Mishnaic Hebrew. You will find discussions of orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, language contact, and sociolinguistics.
In: Hebrew Texts and Language of the Second Temple Period