Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,436 items for :

  • Performing Arts x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Revisiting Critical Event Narrative Inquiry
This thought-provoking research anthology adopts a postmodern stance and fills in a gap of knowledge for the education of professional development in teacher education, health sciences and the arts. Allowing subjectivity and multiple voices, the authors add to the intimate and negotiated knowledge of being and becoming – indigenous, architect, mother, teacher, health researcher, and supervisor. In fifteen chapters, the authors share knowledge of pain and reward in critical events in the realm of professional identity formation. The book provides a selection of personal and far-reaching stories and adds to the reflexivity of memories of critical events.

Contributors are: Geir Aaserud, Åsta Birkeland, Bodil H. Blix, Sidsel Boldermo, Mimesis Heidi Dahlsveen, Nanna Kathrine Edvardsen, Rikke Gürgens Gjærum, Tona Gulpinar, Carola Kleemann, Tove Lafton, Mette Bøe Lyngstad, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Anna-Lena Østern, Alicja R. Sadownik, Tiri Bergesen Schei and Vibeke Solbue.
Volume Editor:
This publication brings together current scholarship that focuses on the significance of performing arts heritage of royal courts in Southeast Asia. The contributors consist of both established and early-career researchers working on traditional performing arts in the region and abroad. The first volume, Pusaka as Documented Heritage, consists of historical case studies, contexts and developments of royal court traditions, particularly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The second volume, Pusaka as Performed Heritage, comprises chapters that problematise royal court traditions in the present century with case studies that examine the viability, adaptability and contemporary contexts for coexisting administrative structures.
A Relational View on Artistic Practices from Africa and the Diaspora
The present volume brings together contributions which explore artworks – including literature, visual arts, film and performances – as dynamic sites of worlding. It puts emphasis on the processes of creating or doing worlds, implying movement as opposed to the boundary drawing of area studies. From such a processual perspective, Africa is not a delineated area, but emerges in a variety of relations which can reach across the continent, but also the Indian Ocean, the Atlantic or Europe.

Contributors are: Thierry Boudjekeu, Elena Brugioni, Ute Fendler, Sophie Lembcke, Gilbert Ndi Shang, Samuel Ndogo, Duncan Tarrant, Kumari Issur, CJ Odhiambo, Michaela Ott, Peter Simatei, Clarissa Vierke, Chinelo J. Enemuo.

Abstract

This article explores the idea of “worlding” as a form of agency in war-intervention imaginaries in East Africa. The article argues that these imaginaries draw their materiality from experiences of war and in return attempt to provide these “worlds” of wars with new and alternative meanings and possibilities. It is these new alternative meanings and possibilities that indeed constitute peace culture. The agency of (re)imagining a peace culture is what constitutes “worlding.” That is, the power of the imaginary to transform lived realities as found in the worlds of these artists as they know and experience them, and in return, the worlds their imaginations (en)vision. Thus, “worldings” in these war imaginaries are construed as a means of devising a world by choosing its chaotic and dysfunctional present while similarly aiming at its transformative future. “Worlding” in a work of art is the process of bringing into being or “setting up” a world or worlds; it is therefore the process of defamiliarizing the world as we know it, investing it with new meanings, and opening it to new possibilities. In demonstrating how “worlding” manifests as an agency of peace culture, the following imaginaries of war are the key subjects of analysis: Ni Sisi, a film for community development; the play Thirty Years of Bananas, by Alex Mukulu; and the novel Murambi, the Book of Bones, by Boubacar Boris Diop.

Open Access
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
Author:

Abstract

This paper proceeds from the understanding that artworks can constitute worlds that are different from present realities. In this process of world-making, art and literature, in general, constitute fictional spaces that either contest the existing ones or are relational to them. What this means, then, is that the process of “worlding” can equally be understood as that of undoing hegemonic formations and spaces.

This article explores how diasporic writings produce political and cultural realities—imagined and utopic—that contest and transform relations based on national rootedness and territorial logic. I will use the term “world-making” to mean the artworks’ ability to contest and transform existing relations of power—whether or not these relations are subsumed under such categories as gender, religion, ethnicity, nation, class, or race—to call alternative temporalities into being. In this sense, I take diaspora-making as a constitutive process that seeks to challenge certain dominant premises, including capitalist globalization, that structure being in the world or being of the world.

Open Access
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks