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Author: Michaela Kelly
During the Fifteen Year War, Japan's 'little citizens' were educated via a curriculum centering patriotic and militarist ideologies. Patriotic Pedagogy: How Karuta Game Cards Taught a Japanese War Generation, explores karuta, a poetry card game developed in this period as progressive early childhood pedagogy. As karuta became popular as an educational toy, educators and publishers soon noted karuta's engaging physical play and short slogans and poems made them ideal for conveying patriotic ideals to children.

Including reproductions of the images and translations of the poems, Kelly offers an analysis of the race, class and gender ideologies the cards conveyed, suggesting that these semingly innocuous children's toys were effective tools of a propagandist pedagogy.

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century, Catalonia witnessed an exponential increase in the use of and predilection for the designs and aesthetic characteristics of Japanese art in the design of stained glass. At the time, oriental forms were received with enthusiasm, which resulted in the development of production of artistic stained glass, inspired by these new models.

This article focuses on the different ways in which Japanese-based designs made their way from Japan to the stained glass workshops of Catalonia, where they were transformed into spectacular pieces, some of which are still preserved today. In addition, the article examines how stained glass makers assimilated the aesthetics and compositional concepts of Japanese art and made them their own, adapting them to their needs while creating innovative stained glass that helped them to, paradoxically, converge with the medieval stained glass on which they were based.

In: Journal of Japonisme
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

George Hendrik Breitner (1857–1923) was a Dutch Realist artist, whose works chronicle urban life in Amsterdam. But his paintings of a young woman, collapsed on a divan and wrapped in a luxuriant kimono, secured his reputation as an exponent of European Japonisme. The so-called ‘Kimono Girls’, completed between 1893 and 1896, are compelling evocations of female leisure, subsumed within an exotic melange of vivid color and pattern. More importantly, they are an amalgamation of several cultural contexts that characterized the volatile nineteenth century. European Japonisme, the revival of Dutch painterly traditions, medical dogma, and the beginnings of organized feminism come together in these works, making them both compelling and subversive.

In: Journal of Japonisme
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

The essay traces the role of Marie Nordlinger (1876-1961) against her ties with Siegfried Bing, Marcel Bing, Marcel Proust and Charles Lang Freer. Nordlinger first worked in the ateliers of art nouveau later becoming a confidante of the Bings who helped sell Japanese prints in the United States especially to Charles Lang Freer when she visited the country.

In: Journal of Japonisme
Author: Amy Newland
Printed and Painted: The Meiji Art of Ogata Gekkō (1859–1920) is the first English-language publication to offer an in-depth look at the life and career of the Japanese painter and woodblock-print designer Ogata Gekkō. This publication brings together 140 prints and paintings by Gekkō, his students and his contemporaries such as Kawanabe Kyōsai, Tsukioka Yoshitoshi and Yōshū Chikanobu across five subject areas: history and legend; pictures of beautiful women; the natural world, rural and city views; literature and theatre; and modern wars and modern soldiers. The extensive introduction brings to life the character and art of Gekkō, including a translation of a personal account by his accomplished student, the shin-hanga (New Print) artist Yamamura Kōka. An artist often overlooked in discussions of the art of the Meiji period (1868–1912), the publication seeks to highlight the vibrant printed and painted world of the era.
In: Journal of Japonisme