Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 489 items for :

  • Literature & Culture x
  • Middle East and Islamic Studies x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Abstract

Many Jewish communities around the world have maintained a special site, known as a genizah, for discarding written materials. This article focuses on the genizah of the town of Safed in the Galilee. At the end of the sixteenth century, the Safed Genizah preserved Hebrew manuscripts written by Ḥayyim Vital (d. 1620), foremost student of the influential kabbalist Yitsḥaḳ Luria (d. 1572). These manuscripts were excavated and edited in the mid-seventeenth century and became authoritative texts in the history of Jewish esotericism. My study describes Vital’s burial of his manuscripts and the editorial efforts of the Jewish scholars who followed him, particularly Avraham Azulai (d. 1643) in Hebron and Ya‘akov Tsemaḥ (d. 1666) and his fellowship in Jerusalem. Through analysis of their rhetoric and scribal practices, I explore the ethical, philological, and material aspects of this chapter in the pre-history of Genizah research.

Open Access
In: Philological Encounters
V. F. Minorsky and C. J. Edmonds Correspondence (1928-1965)
This volume is an annotated correspondence, of nearly forty years, between two prominent Orientalists. The letters cover a range of topics related to the Zagros Mountains, its peoples, their history, culture, and languages. They also offer a glimpse into the personal lives and careers of the two scholars, give valuable insights on the development of the field of Kurdish Studies, and to an extent outline the contours of what the two referred to as Zagrology.
In: Contributions to Zagrology
In: Contributions to Zagrology
Free access
In: Philological Encounters
Author:

Abstract

This article theorizes on resettler nationalism while discussing the architectural impacts of partitions and compulsory mass migrations that have drawn the borders of modern countries. It concentrates on the resettling process after the “Exchange of Populations” (Antallagi/Mübadele, 1923) between Greece and Turkey, which was in effect a partition dividing the Christian and Muslim communities of the Ottoman Empire. It argues that the national and international authorities treated land settlement as a top-down demographic engineering device and its architecture as a modern technological enterprise in a post-conflict setting, failing to notice the trauma of mass expulsion. Reading migrant testimonies on both sides of the Aegean Sea and tracing architectural histories from below exposes the contrast between the accounts of state agents and those subject to resettler nationalism. It reconceptualizes partition as the rift between rulers and peoples and not the rift between two communities.

Open Access
In: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World
Free access
In: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World
Author:

Abstract

When was the city visually regarded and depicted as a comprehensive and intact entity?

Going beyond historiographical conventions and temporal boundaries, this study discusses the specific and crucial moments of discovering the image of the city as a whole, its wide-ranging skyline, full profile, and clear outer borders. Thus, histories of the formation of the distant gaze, a sort of visual withdrawal which enabled us to capture the city as a whole – as an object of visual desire – are disclosed, and attention is drawn to the common patterns of these specific pictorial renditions. Likewise, the sense of detachment is exposed when distance moves beyond its denotation of spatial stance and appears related to discovering the historical time of these urban renditions.

Open Access
In: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World

Abstract

From the early-nineteenth century onwards, Orientalist visual constructs heavily shaped European depictions and analyses of mosque architecture. Over time, these representations shifted from the Orientalist exoticized scenographic model to the “scientific” language of the orthographic drawing. This article analyzes that process, tracing the evolution of a series of published plan drawings for five historical mosques. Unpacking their authors’ drafting techniques and examining the relationship between the isolation of the drawing and the understanding of the mosque as a timeless monument highlights the gaps of knowledge reproduced within the canonical texts of Islamic architecture and their disciplinary impact.

Open Access
In: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World