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This volume delves into the multifaceted world of Chrysostom, shedding light on his pivotal role as an exegete. It explores his cultural background, his preferred themes and his enduring influence. It introduces the reader to Chrysostom's exegetical workshop, his predecessors and successors in biblical interpretation, and offers a fresh assessment of his connection to Greco-Roman and Syriac contexts.
Histoire et archéologie antiques et médiévales
Les Chrétiens de Najrān sont célèbres grâce à leur martyrs (en novembre 523) et à leurs relations avec la principauté théocratique fondée par Muḥammad à Médine en 622. Mais, jusqu’à ces dernières années, seule la tradition savante manuscrite, chrétienne et musulmane, prouvait leur existence. Ce n’est plus le cas désormais. Depuis 2014, d’importants vestiges archéologiques, principalement des inscriptions rupestres, peuvent leur être attribués.
La nature et la distribution chronologique de ces vestiges apportent de substantielles inflexions aux connaissances sur l’histoire de ces Chrétiens, encore influents au xe siècle, et sur les langues et les écritures en usage à Najrān.

The Christians of Najrān are known by their martyrdom (November 523), described in Christian sources. According to Muslim tradition, the community was in relation with the polity of Medina, founded by Muḥammad in 622. Recent archeological discoveries attest this community in more details and bring substantial changes to our knowledge. Situated between Yemen and Medina, Najrān was not only an influential Christian community persisting until the 10th century, but has seen remarkable transformations. The Christians of Najrān underwent developments, some of which find an echo in the Qurʾān, the earliest layer of Arabic script and the Muslim tradition.
Syria, Constantinople, Moldavia, Wallachia and the Cossacks’ Lands
Author:
Paul of Aleppo, an archdeacon of the Church of Antioch, journeyed with his father Patriarch Makarios III ibn al-Za'im to Constantinople, Moldavia, Wallachia and the Cossack's lands in 1652-1654, before heading for Moscow. This book presents his travel notes, preceded by his record of the patriarchs of the Church of Antioch and the story of his father's office as a bishop and election to the patriarchal seat. The author gives detailed information on the contemporary events in Ottoman Syria and provides rich and diverse information on the history, culture, and religious life of all the lands he travelled across.
In: Paul of Aleppo's Journal, Volume 1
In: Paul of Aleppo's Journal, Volume 1
In: Paul of Aleppo's Journal, Volume 1
In: Paul of Aleppo's Journal, Volume 1
In: Paul of Aleppo's Journal, Volume 1
Revisiting Trajectories in the Fourth-Century Christological Debates
In Antioch, Nicaea, and the Synthesis of Constantinople, Dragoș Andrei Giulea delineates a new map of the theological trajectories involved in the fourth-century Christological debates, and envisions the solution of Constantinople 381 as a synthesis of the two theoretical paradigms produced at the councils of Antioch 268 and Nicaea 325. The author argues that the main theological trajectories participating in the debate were the Antiochene, the Arian, the Nicene, the Homoian, and the pro-Nicene.

Giulea redefines the pro-Nicene theology, which dominated the discussions of Constantinople 381, as a synthesis of the most effective metaphysical categories of Antioch and Nicaea. Basil of Caesarea initiated the pro-Nicene synthesis by developing a dual Trinitarian discourse, simultaneously securing ontological individuality and divine unity.
In: Antioch, Nicaea, and the Synthesis of Constantinople