Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 979 items for :

  • Archaeology, Art & Architecture x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
The mission of this series is to support scholarship in diverse fields under the umbrella of the creative arts. With particular interest in theater, music, film and visual culture, this series seeks to publish cutting edge cultural history that contextualize these growing areas of scholarship within the larger tapestry of the Jewish experience.
Judaism and Spatiality in Hasmonean and Herodian Galilee
Author:
We understand the world around us in terms of built spaces. Such spaces are shaped by human activity, and in turn, affect how people live. Through an analysis of archaeological and textual evidence from the beginnings of Hasmonean influence in Galilee, until the outbreak of the First Jewish War against Rome, this book explores how Judaism was socially expressed: bodily, communally, and regionally. Within each expression, certain aspects of Jewish identity operate, these being purity conceptions, communal gatherings, and Galilee's relationship with the Hasmoneans, Jerusalem, and the Temple in its final days.
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Free access
In: IMAGES