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Si le yiddish est en train de disparaître, « vers où se dirige cette disparition » demandait avec angoisse le poète yiddish Avrom Sutzkever. La question d’une disparition potentielle du yiddish est déclinée dans des œuvres littéraires, des témoignages, et des enquêtes psychanalytiques en une multitude d’autres langues. Les études réunies dans ce volume définissent la confusion linguistique qui en résulte comme un symptôme de ce traumatisme historique, mêlant singulièrement résonances intimes et expériences collectives. Elles illustrent la nécessité de repenser la question des interactions entre les langues, comme un moment essentiel de prise en compte des tragédies historiques et une étape productive vers une compréhension plus nuancée des notions de multiculturalisme et de plurilinguisme, caractéristiques essentielles de notre époque.

“Please show me / Where the language will go down”, the Yiddish poet Avrom Sutzkever anxiously asked. Questions surrounding the potential disappearance of Yiddish resonate far and wide, in literary works, personal testimonies, social dynamics, and psychoanalytical inquiries in a range of other languages. The studies gathered in this volume all point at the resulting linguistic confusion as a symptom of historical trauma, singularly combining intimate resonances and collective experiences. They also argue for the necessity to sketch out new ways of thinking about interactions among languages as an essential moment of reckoning with historical tragedies and a productive step towards a more nuanced understanding of issues of multi-culturalism and plurilingualism as an essential feature of our times.
Volume Editors: and
The Second and Third Generation have become increasingly active in remembering and researching their families’ pasts, especially now that most refugees from National Socialism have passed away. How was lived experience mediated to them, and how have their own lives and identities been impacted by persecution and flight?
This volume offers a valuable insight into the personal experience of the Second Generation, as well as a perceptive analysis of film, art, and literature created by or about the subsequent generations. Recurring themes of silences, transferred trauma, postmemory, and “roots journeys" are explored, revealing the distance, connection, and collaboration between the generations.

Contributors are: David Clark, Miriam E. David, Rachel Dickson, Yannick Gnipep-oo Pembouong, Anita H. Grosz, Andrea Hammel, Brean Hammond, Stephanie Homer, Merilyn Moos, Angharad Mountford, Teresa von Sommaruga Howard, Jennifer Taylor, and Sue Vice.
Author:
This monograph spotlights women writers’ contributions to the philosophy of German Romanticism. Dorothea Mendelssohn Veit Schlegel, Rahel Levin Varnhagen, Karoline von Günderrode, and Bettina Brentano von Arnim suggested a new vision for an emancipated community of women that develops through philosophical discourse of Progressive Universal Poetry. Their personal, fictionalized, and literary letters reinvent and retheorize the Romantic notions of sociability, symphilosophy, and sympoetry, as theorized by men, and retheorize the concepts of love. They provided a model for shaping intellectual and cultural life in the modern world while challenging rigid dichotomies of classs, gender, and ethnicity.
The queenship of the first European Renaissance queen regnant never ceases to fascinate. Was she a saint or a bigoted zealot? A pious wife or the one wearing the pants? Was she ultimately responsible for genocide? A case has been made to canonize her. Does she deserve to be called Saint Isabel? As different groups from fascists to feminists continue to fight over Isabel as cultural capital, we ask which (if any) of these recyclings are legitimate or appropriate. Or has this figure taken on a life of her own?

Contributors to this volume: Roger Boase, David A. Boruchoff, John Edwards, Emily Francomano, Edward Friedman, Cristina Guardiola-Griffiths, Michelle Hamilton, Elizabeth Teresa Howe, Hilaire Kallendorf, William D. Phillips, Jr., Nuria Silleras-Fernandez, Caroline Travalia, and Jessica Weiss.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is volume 2 of a two-volume set.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is volume 1 of a two-volume set.
In: Abraham Ibn Ezra Latinus: Henry Bate’s Latin Versions of Abraham Ibn Ezra's Astrological Writings
In: Abraham Ibn Ezra Latinus: Henry Bate’s Latin Versions of Abraham Ibn Ezra's Astrological Writings