Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,650 items for :

  • Comparative Religion & Religious Studies x
  • Social Sciences x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Change and Its Discontents: Religious Organizations and Religious Life in Central and Eastern Europe
Volume Editors: and
This volume presents a comparative study on the pivotal role of religion in social transformation of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) over the past three decades. Organized into four thematic sections, it examines divergent patterns of religiosity and non-religious worldviews, secularization, religious presence in public life, and processes of identity formation. Comparison across the countries in the CEE reveals the absence of uniform and synchronic dynamics in the region. The geopolitical and cultural heterogeneity, the need to understand post-1989 social processes in the context of a much longer historical development of the region, and the importance of incorporating religious factors — are central to all contributions in this volume.

Contributors are: Mikhail Antonov, Olga Breskaya, Zsuzsanna Demeter-Karászi, Jan Kaňák, Alar Kilp, Zsófia Kocsis, Tobias Koellner, Valéria Markos, András Máté-Tóth, Jerry G. Pankhurst, Gabriella Pusztai, Ringo Ringvee, Ariane Sadjed, Marjan Smrke, Miroslav Tížik, David Václavík, Jan Váně, Marko Veković, and Siniša Zrinščak.
Brazilian and Pakistani Lived Experiences in Australia
The book explains how honour consciousness shapes the lives of Brazilian and Pakistani women in their countries of origin, and the relationship between honour, religion and gender highlighting the question: is honour consciousness experienced differently by men and women? In this book, I explore how lived experiences of honour consciousness and religion in Brazil and Pakistan are hybridised and operate on a spectrum and are manifested through gender power relations and demonstrated through “moderate” and “extreme” notions of honour consciousness, and how these are transmitted to Australia. These concepts give a new epistemological perspective to the use of Hegel and Foucault within gender studies.
Narratives around Sacred Places in Sinjar (Iraq) and the Islamic State’s Genocide against Yezidis
On August 3, 2014, the Sinjar region of Northern Iraq was attacked by the “Islamic State”. Killing and abducting thousands, the jihadists also destroyed many of the religious minority’s shrines. Others, however, were defended by local fighters and groups affiliated with the PKK. In the aftermath of the genocide, stories of divine intervention into the defence bolstered land claims of serveral Kurdish political groups. Through extensive fieldwork in the region, I trace imaginaries of Sinjar as a landscape of resistance and a communal history of continuous persecution to current political disputes and attempts to construct a unified Yezidi identity.
Author:
In a decade, Francis has transformed Catholicism into a dynamic institution that openly deliberates on urgent questions of society and religion, standing at the forefront of digitally driven public opinion. With this in mind, Portrayals of Pope Francis’s Authority in the Digital Age: Flicks and Media Discourses, and User Perspectives explores the digital portraits of Pope Francis in various types of media content and productions. It investigates how digital Catholic users articulate and negotiate papal authority and through which media they do so.
Analysing the Spectrum of Muslim Social Mobilization during the Internet Age
Author:
This book is the first ‘groundwork’ on Muslim NGOs in contemporary Ghana. It builds upon a database of more than 600 Muslim non-profit associations, foundations and grass-roots organisations whose activities are traced through extensive use of social media. The first part of the book scrutinises the varieties of their activities and operational spaces, their campaigns and target groups, alongside their local, regional, national and international connections. The second part analyses contemporary debates on infaq, sadaqa, waqf and zakat as well as Islamic banking and micro-finance schemes for promoting social welfare among Muslim communities in Ghana.
Editors: and
The European Values Studies book series is based on the results of a large-scale, cross-national, and longitudinal survey research program, founded in the late 1970s by a foundation which is now called the European Values Study. This group investigates basic social, cultural, political, moral, and religious values held by the populations of the European countries. The first study was carried out in 1981, followed by repeat surveys in 1990, 1999, and 2008, in an increasing number of countries. Today, all European countries are involved in the European Values Study. The publications in this series include interpretations and explanations of the quantitative survey data. These are presented in the form of monographs and edited volumes. The Series also publishes sourcebooks.

The series has published one volume over the last 5 years.

Abstract

Supranational cultural institutions and communities play an interesting role in the development of abortion policy both historically and today. In this article we consider two such institutions: the Catholic Church and the European community. The church is famously antiabortion, and we describe the ways in which the Catholic position manifests itself in different countries. Conversely, almost all European countries have liberal laws that allow abortion on demand for twelve weeks of pregnancy. Italy sits at the intersection of European and Catholic identities. Italy adopted European-style liberal abortion laws early, but Italians continue to identify with the church in surveys, which is one of the causes of high levels of conscientious objection by medical professionals. Italy’s abortion policy pleases neither Catholics nor secularists. We explain this by understanding Italy’s abortion law as liberal de jure, but its culture is still heavily influenced by Catholicism, resulting in limited abortion access de facto.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe

Abstract

In this article we will examine how ethnicity (Russians and Russian speakers of mixed ethnic identities) and religion (Orthodoxy) interact and construct ethnoreligious identity in the case of Orthodox Christians in Lithuania. To investigate these aspects, the article will draw on data from qualitative fieldwork (2019–2021) and the analysis of articles from the official journal of the archdiocese of Vilnius and Lithuania. We argue that for the Orthodox community in Lithuania, the historically established close links of Orthodoxy with Russian Orthodox tradition and Russian identity are important today. However, a significant part of the Lithuanian Orthodox community identifies with the global (Byzantium) and/or local (Grand Duchy of Lithuania) Orthodox tradition and faces the challenge of including the Lithuanian language in religious education and practices.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe