Browse results

Author:
The UK has demonstrated its preference for intergovernmental rather than supranational relations. Nonetheless, 47 years of EU membership have involved unparalleled restrictions on its sovereignty, which have triggered the attempt to ‘take back control’ through its withdrawal. This book shows how the British left us with valuable lessons on the legal and procedural constraints to EU withdrawal, which have led to a post-Brexit Britain that continues bound by the important supranational features that have transcended its abandoned membership into its new relationship with the EU.
In this work Julia Wojnowska-Radzińska offers a comprehensive legal analysis of various forms of pre-emptive data surveillance adopted by the European legislator and their impact on fundamental rights. It also identifies what minimum guarantees have to be set up to recognize pre-emptive data surveillance as a legitimate measure in a democratic society. The book aims at answering an essential question how to strike a proper balance between fundamental rights and security interests in the digital age.
Author:
This book argues that there are three dividing lines regarding modes and consequences of property transfers which should not be conflated by comparative lawyers, namely, intent alone versus intent plus, unitary approach versus separatist approach, and causality versus abstraction. Unlike Chinese law, English law takes a non-unified approach not only in the stage of transfer but also in the stage of restitution, where the consequence in relation to the property right transferred under a flawed underlying basis can be purely causal, purely abstract, and abstract in common law but causal in equity. Nevertheless, abstraction is normatively more justifiable than causality.
The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives.

In the Thematic Section of volume 4, entitled ‘Regionalisation and Localisation of International Disaster Law’, distinguished scholars explored legal/institutional approaches adopted by regional and sub-regional organizations toward disaster law issues or the interaction of international disaster law and policies with domestic legal orders and local actors.
Volume Editors: and
The Treaty of Lisbon has significantly enhanced the EU’s institutional framework and the instruments at its disposal in foreign policy and external relations, notably through the creation of the function of the High Representative, supported by the European External Action Service. Contributing to the maintenance of international peace and security is one of the core objectives of the EU’s external action. This volume, with contributions from legal experts on EU foreign policy and external relations, illustrates the manifold legal issues arising in EU external action and in its efforts to achieve this essential objective.
Editor:
Studies in EU External Relations is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to the legal, political, trade and historical aspects of the EU's relations with non-member states or regions or other international organisations.

Focusing on the EU's position and role in the world, the series covers the Union’s bilateral as well as its multilateral relations with third countries. This coverage extends to institutional, legal and political issues on or affecting external relations, as well as to specific sectoral substantive topics, including migration, defence or trade matters for example. The series also includes monographs on the external dimension of substantive domestic EU policies (competition, environment, etc). In addition, the series welcomes studies on various facets of the EU enlargement phenomenon and the European Neighbourhood Policy.

Manuscript Submission:

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to Marie Sheldon.

For further information on book proposals and manuscript submission, please see our Author Gateway.
Volume Editors: and
What makes the relationship between Switzerland and the EU so challenging? For both parties, mutual relations are of crucial importance, not least economically. As a result of the Swiss voters’ rejection of the European Economic Area 30 years ago, there is at present a large number of agreements agreements that provide for Switzerland's partial participation in the EU's internal market as well as other matters. At the same time, there has now for more than a decade been an increasing degree of institutional and legal uncertainty. The present volume offers an inventory of different sides of this special relationship, which is interesting also in a comparative context.
This authoritative, 8-volume commentary, drafted by scholars of the Academic Network on the European Social Charter and Social Rights (ANESC), offers an article-by-article analysis of the European Social Charter, while providing insight into its context and the conceptual and operational links between the various Charter provisions. Contributions are written by a wide range of experts from different countries and legal traditions, with expertise in social and economic rights.
Volume 1 deals with Cross-cutting Themes. The article-by-article Commentary is divided as follows: Volume 2 (Preamble, Articles 1 to 10); Volume 3 (Articles 11 to 19); Volume 4 (Articles 20 to 31); Volume 5 (Part III, Art A and B, Part IV, Art C); Volume 6 (Part IV, art D - Collective complaints); Volume 7 (Part V - Art E, F, G, H, I, J, Part VI - Art K, L, M, N, O and introduction of the Appendix); and Volume 8 (Rules of the European Committee of Social Rights).
The Significance of ELSPI Perspectives
This edited collection examines the ethical, legal, social and policy implications of genome editing technologies. Moreover, it offers a broad spectrum of timely legal analysis related to bringing genome editing to the market and making it available to patients, including addressing genome editing technology regulation through procedures for regulatory approval, patent law and competition law.

In twelve chapters, this volume offers persuasive arguments for justifying transformative regulatory interventions regarding human genome editing, as well as the various legal venues for introducing necessary or desirable changes needed to create an environment for realizing the potential of genome editing technology for the benefit of patients and society.
Volume 2, Preamble, Part I and Part II (Articles 1 to 10)
This authoritative commentary drafted by scholars of the Academic Network on the European Social Charter and Social Rights (ANESC) is aimed at academic researchers studying social and economic rights in Europe and legal practitioners, civil society organisations, trade unions and state representatives engaging with the procedures of the European Committee of Social Rights. The text is composed of contributions from a large number of experts, bringing together senior and young scholars across different countries and legal traditions with expertise in social and economic rights and a commitment to enhancing the European system for regulating these rights.

The commentary offers 106 chapters, organised into eight volumes, some of which are focused on the substantive obligations of State Parties to the European Social Charter and the practice of the European Committee of Social Rights and others on the procedures that state representatives, international bodies and applicants must follow to engage with the Charter system.

Volume 2 analyses the European Social Charter provisions, starting with the Preamble and covering Articles 1 to 10.