Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 7,751 items for :

  • Historical and Comparative Linguistics & Linguistic Typology x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
This is a peer-reviewed, inclusive, non-Eurocentric, multi-disciplinary book series devoted to the interdisciplinary study of ancient civilizations from all continents.
- ALAC is fully-funded by the Research Centre For History and Culture (RCHC). All volumes are published under a CC BY-NC-ND license.
- Proposals must present original work and must have been submitted exclusively to ALAC. Both monographs and edited volumes are welcome.
- Submissions may regard any civilizations from any continents, developed between prehistory and the 15th century AD, that is, the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire.
- Submissions may regard any aspects of Antiquity: history, archaeology, art and architecture, philology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, etc.
- ALAC also considers studies of oral literature, such as proverbs and folklore, as well as field work on endangered languages, which represent the legacy of ancient traditions verbally transmitted from generation to generation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and full manuscripts by email to the Series Editors: Professor CHEN Zhi , Professor Carlotta Viti , and Dr WANG Xiang (Shawn Wang) .
This volume presents the up-to-date results of investigations into the Asian origins of the only two languages families of North America that are widely acknowledged as having likely genetic links in northern Asia. It brings together all that has been proposed to date under the respective rubrics of the Uralo-Siberian (Eskimo-Yukaghir-Uralic) hypothesis and the Dene-Yeniseian hypothesis. The evolution of the two parallel research strategies for fleshing out these likely linguistic links between North America and Asia are compared and contrasted. Although focusing on stringently controlled linguistic reconstructions the volume draws upon archaeological and human genetic data where relevant.
Volume Editors: Andreas Lammer and Mareike Jas
This volume—the proceedings of a 2018 conference at LMU Munich funded by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation—brings together, for the first time, experts on Greek, Syriac, and Arabic traditions of doxography. Fourteen contributions provide new insight into state-of-the-art contemporary research on the widespread phenomenon of doxography. Together, they demonstrate how Greek, Syriac, and Arabic forms of doxography share common features and raise related questions that benefit interdisciplinary exchange among colleagues from various disciplines, such as classics, Arabic studies, and the history of philosophy.
Im Zentrum dieses Teils der baskischen Schriften Wilhelm von Humboldts steht die Frage nach dem Verhältnis des Baskischen zum Iberischen, Keltiberischen und anderen Sprachen des vorrömischen Europa.
Die neue Edition der Schriften zur Sprachwissenschaft Wilhelm von Humboldts zielt darauf ab, die erst in den 1990er Jahren wiederentdeckten, verschollen geglaubten Nachlasspapiere Wilhelm von Humboldts zu edieren. Das Baskische war für viele Jahre ein wichtiger Forschungsgegenstand Humboldts. Die erste große Beschäftigung mit einer nicht-indogermanischen Sprache und die Kontakte mit frühen baskischen Grammatikern, Literaten und Intellektuellen führte dazu, retrospektiv diese Episode seines Lebens als die der Herausbildung sprachwissenschaftlichen Denkens zu bezeichnen. Er plante ein großes dreibändiges Baskenwerk. Der nun vorgelegte dritte Band rekonstruiert die Genese seiner einschlägig sehr intensiv rezipierten und diskutierten Schrift zur Stellung des Baskischen im vorrömischen Spanien und im alten Europa.
How is it possible to write down the Japanese language exclusively in Chinese characters? And how are we then able to determine the language behind the veil of the Chinese script as Japanese? The history of writing in Japan presents us with a fascinating variety of writing styles ranging from phonography to morphography and all shades in between.
In Japanese Morphography: Deconstructing hentai kanbun, Gordian Schreiber shows that texts traditionally labelled as “hentai kanbun” or “variant Chinese” are, in fact, morphographically written Japanese texts instead and not just the result of an underdeveloped skill in Chinese. The study fosters our understanding of writing system typology beyond phonographic writing.
Nobody can deny that an account of grammatical change that takes written contact into consideration is a significant challenge for any theoretical perspective. Written contact of earlier periods or from a diachronic perspective mainly refers to contact through translation. The present book includes a diachronic dimension in the study of written language contact by examining aspects of the history of translation as related to grammatical changes in English and Greek in a contrastive way. In this respect, emphasis is placed on the analysis of diachronic retranslations: the book examines translations from earlier periods of English and Greek in relation to various grammatical characteristics of these languages in different periods and in comparison to non-translated texts.
This book presents for the first time all texts constituting the Eastern Old Japanese corpus as well as the dictionary including all lexical items found. Unlike its relative Western Old Japanese, Eastern Old Japanese is not based on the language of just two geographic localities, but is stretched along several provinces of Ancient Japan along the Pacific Seaboard (modern Aichi to Ibaraki) and across the island of Honshū from Etchū (Modern Toyama and parts of Ishikawa) province to Shinano and Kai provinces (modern Nagano and Yamanashi). Therefore, references to places of attestation are included into our dictionary, too.