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Emblematics and the Brazilian Avant-Garde (1920-30s)
Author:
In Antropofagia, Aarnoud Rommens shows how this Brazilian avant-garde movement (1920-30s) deconstructed early tendencies in the European vanguard. Through imaginative re-readings, the author reinterprets Antropofagia’s central texts and images as elements within an ever-changing, neo-baroque memory palace. Not only does the movement subvert established conceptions of the pre- and postcolonial; it is also a counter-colonial critique of verbal and visual literacy. To do justice to the dynamic between visibility and legibility, Rommens develops the inventive methodology of ‘emblematics’. The book’s implications are wide-ranging, prompting a revaluation of the avant-garde as a transmedial tactic for disrupting our reading and viewing habits.
Author:
This book examines the interrelationships between trauma, time, and narrative in the novel “The Journey” (1962) by the scholar, novelist, poet, and Holocaust survivor H. G. Adler. Drawing on Paul Ricœur’s philosophy of time and studies of time in literature, Julia Menzel analyzes how Adler’s novel depicts the experience of time as a dimension of Holocaust victims’ trauma. She explores the aesthetic temporality of “The Journey” and presents a new interpretation of the literary text, which she conceives of as a modern “Zeit-Roman” (time novel).

Die Studie untersucht die Wechselbeziehungen zwischen Trauma, Zeit und Erzählung in dem Roman „Eine Reise“ (1962) des Wissenschaftlers, Schriftstellers, Dichters und Holocaust-Überlebenden H. G. Adler. Unter Bezugnahme auf Paul Ricœurs Zeitphilosophie und die literaturwissenschaftliche Zeitforschung analysiert Julia Menzel, wie Adlers Roman traumatische Zeiterfahrungen der Opfer des Holocaust zur Darstellung bringt. Sie erkundet die ästhetische Eigenzeit von „Eine Reise“ und eröffnet eine neue Lesart des literarischen Texts, den sie als modernen Zeit-Roman begreift.
Our identities are shaped by narratives, and cinema contributes to that process. While there is substantial scholarship on both narrative identity and film narrative, there is very little investigation of the intersection between them. This book provides that, with particular attention to how the interaction between film narratives and life narratives affect the meaning of life. Traditional issues like spectator activity and realism appear in a different light when viewed through this interaction. It also reveals how film can both help and hinder the meaning or our lives by sustaining oppressive narratives or promoting new narrative possibilities.
Antinomies of Self-Determination in Four Aesthetic Studies
Author:
A strategic reconstruction of modern German thought from the standpoint of aesthetic theory, The Narrowest Path reveals the characteristically modern, revolutionary project of freedom-as-autonomy to be unresolvably antinomic. Basing himself on four seminal texts by Kleist, Hegel, Marx, and Adorno, Mehrgan develops four basic figures: the literary, the person, the republic, and the artwork. All flourished during the long period between the French Revolution and the aftermath of the Second World War in Europe. The key antagonist is the rule of capital, paradoxically enabling self-determination and thwarting it. Still present in contemporary revolutionary experiments, this daunting conflict, the book argues, shows itself best in the aesthetic — but the resolution lies elsewhere.
Volume Editors: and
Islamic Sensory History, Volume 2: 600–1500 presents a selection of texts translated into English from Arabic and Persian. These selected texts all offer illustrative engagements with issues related to the sensorium in different times, places, and social milieus throughout the early and medieval history of Islamic societies. Each chapter is prefaced by an introductory essay by the translator, with specific attention to the role of the senses in the translated text’s language, genre, and social context.

Contributors
Eyad Abuali, Tanvir Ahmed, Hanif Amin Beidokhti, Shahzad Bashir, Maroussia Bednarkiewicz, David Bennett, Hinrich Biesterfeldt, Julie Bonnéric, Adam Bursi, Fatih Han, Rotraud Hansberger, Jan Hogendijk, Domenico Ingenito, Anya King, Hannelies Koloska, Christian Lange, Danilo Marino, Richard McGregor, Pernilla Myrne, Nawal Nasrallah, Zhinia Noorian, Austin O’Malley, Franz Rosenthal (†), Everett K. Rowson, Abdelhamid I. Sabra (†), George Sawa, Asghar Seyed-Gohrab, Jocelyn Sharlet, Cornelis van Lit, Geert Jan van Gelder, James Weaver, Ines Weinrich, Brannon Wheeler, Alan Williams, Cyrus Ali Zargar.