Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 7,444 items for :

  • Ancient Philosophy x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:
In the treatise On the Change of Names (part of his magnum opus, the Allegorical Commentary), Philo of Alexandria brings his figurative exegesis of the Abraham cycle to its fruition. Taking a cue from Platonist interpreters of Homer’s Odyssey, Philo reads Moses’s story of Abraham as an account of the soul’s progress and perfection. Responding to contemporary critics, who mocked Genesis 17 as uninspired, Philo finds instead a hidden philosophical reflection on the ineffability of the transcendent God, the transformation of souls which recognize their mortal nothingness, the possibility of human faith enabled by peerless faithfulness of God, and the fruit of moral perfection: joy divine, prefigured in the birth of Isaac.
Volume Editors: and
Despite Aristotle's family background and his undeniable impact on ancient Greek medicine, the influence of medicine on Aristotle's philosophy is controversial and far from universally acknowledged. The aim of this volume is to re-examine the influence of medical knowledge and literature on Aristotle's work, in particular to explore the connections with the Hippocratic writings. The volume encourages further exploration of this interdisciplinary area and offers new insights by presenting a series of case studies that examine in detail specific debates within the Aristotelian corpus in relation to the medical literature.
Volume Editors: and
In the Gorgias Plato offers a synthesis of what he thinks about the bitter conflict between philosophical and non-philosophical approaches to one’s responsibilities in private and public life. This book contributes to a deeper understanding of such a historically and conceptually rich canvas by shedding light on its main topics: speech in its philosophical and non-philosophical forms, psychology in relation to virtuous life, and politics which charges the two former topics with high stakes that call for personal choices.
D’une Herméneutique de la Nature à une Sémiotique de la Culture
Author:
Salah Natij's book, Al-Jahiz's Theory of Bayân: From a Hermeneutics of Nature to a Semiotics of Culture is the first comprehensive study entirely devoted to the Bayān theory (communication, hermeneutics, semiology) elaborated in the middle of the ninth century by the Arab encyclopedist and polygrapher al-Jāḥiẓ (d. 255 H./ 869). It is a work that restores to the Jāḥiẓian theory of bayān its originality by showing that it does not constitute a simple linguistic rhetoric (Balāgha), having the verbal statement (Lafẓ) as its sole object, but a hermeneutic-semiological perspective that studies not only speech (lafẓ), but also all types of signs that living beings, human and non-human, produce, emit and use to communicate or adapt to their living environment.
Author:
The book is a critical edition of the text with an English translation and commentary of Proclus’ On the Hieratic Art according to the Greeks. The Hieratic Art is the Theurgic Art, theurgy, the theurgic union with the divine. Proclus describes the theurgic union, putting an emphasis on a conceptual blending of ritual actions (teletai, e.g. the role of statues, incenses, synthêmata, symbols, purifications, invocations and epiphanies) and philosophical concepts (e.g. union of many powers, ‘one and many’, symphathy, natural sympathies, attraction, mixing and division).
The Myth of Hercules and Omphale in the Visual Arts, 1500–1800
The book examines the myth of Hercules and Omphale/Iole which became an important topic in the visual arts, 1500–1800. It offers an analysis of the iconography from the perspective of the history of emotions, classical and Neo-Latin philology, reception and gender studies. The early modern inventions of the myth excel in a skilful display of mixed and compound emotions, such as the male character's psychopathology, and of the theatrical performance of emotions by the female character.