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An Alchemist in the Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom
The German physician, alchemist, kabbalist, and theosopher Heinrich Khunrath (ca. 1560–1605) is one of the most remarkable figures in the intellectual history of the Renaissance. His work, combining text and images in a new way, is a fusion of the contemporary currents of thought in which alchemy went hand-in-hand with philosophy and Lutheran heterodox theology. As a follower of Paracelsus, Khunrath was in search of both the secrets of nature and and the knowledge of God -- the “theosophy”. This
Series:  Aries Book Series
This is a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
Prologue: Bio-Bibliography and Introduction to Khunrath’s Images
This is the 1st volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
This is the 2nd volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
This is the 3rd volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
Epilogue: Reception (from Rosicrucians to Modern Occulture) & Bibliography
This is the 4th volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
The work provides a commented critical edition of Erasmus’s Apophthegmata (books V-VIII), the most successful early modern collection of memorable sayings and anecdotes. The substantial introduction analyses the genre of apophthegmata in antiquity, and the genesis, composition, sources and particularities of Erasmus’s work.
Like the editions of Basel (Froben, 1538-1540) and Leiden (Van der Aa, 1703-1706) the Amsterdam edition of the complete works of Erasmus of Rotterdam is arranged according to the division into nine ordines (categories) which Erasmus himself laid down for the posthumous publication of his collected works. Each ordo corresponds to a specific literary or thematic category within Erasmus' oeuvre, in the following manner:

I — Writings on philological and educational questions
II — Proverbs and sayings (Adagia)
III — Correspondence
IV — Writings on moral questions
V — Writings relating to religious instruction
VI — The Latin translation of the New Testament, the Edition of the Greek text and annotations
VII — Paraphrases of the New Testament
VIII — Writings relating to Church Fathers (including several translations from Greek)
IX — Apologies

Each volume of the Amsterdam edition contains one or more works by Erasmus and is indicated by a Roman numeral, which refers to an ordo, followed by an Arabic numeral, by which the volumes within each ordo are numbered. For example ASD I-3 contains the Colloquia (discussions, colloquies). Erasmus’s correspondence (ordo III) is available in the edition of P. S. Allen, H. M. Allen and H. W. Garrod (12 vols., Oxford 1906-1958), and has for this reason not been included in the Amsterdam edition.

For more information visit also the journal Erasmus Studies.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Abstract

This article examines the doctrine of minima naturalia (i.e., the smallest quantity of matter able to preserve the substantial form of a material substance) in three of the earliest extant Latin commentaries on Aristotle’s Physics: the two traditionally ascribed to Roger Bacon (1214/1220–1292), i.e., Questiones supra libros octo Physicorum Aristotelis and Questiones supra libros quatuor Physicorum Aristotelis, and the anonymous In Physicam Aristotelis, which Rega Wood attributes to Richard Rufus of Cornwall (fl. 1231–1256). The position presented by Bacon in Questiones supra libros octo Physicorum displays striking similarities with the one adopted by the author of In Physicam Aristotelis, but also important differences. Moreover, the fact that the view defended in Questiones supra libros quatuor Physicorum is openly rejected in Questiones supra libros octo Physicorum provides additional support to Silvia Donati’s hypothesis that the former is not an authentic work by Bacon.

In: Vivarium
Author:

Abstract

This study aims to shed new light on Nicholas of Cusa as a reader of Plato by examining the autographic marginalia transmitted in the Codex Cusanus 177, the most significant Platonic collection within Cusanus’s extant library. More specifically, the article focuses on Cusanus’s reading of three Platonic dialogues translated into Latin by Leonardo Bruni (Apology of Socrates, Phaedo, and Phaedrus) and illustrates their common reception in a specific phase of Cusanus’s production, from the composition of the Apologia doctae ignorantiae (1449) to the redaction of the Idiota trilogy (1450). The article not only shows how the thought of Cusanus developed in the margins of the Platonic manuscripts, but also reconstructs Cusanus’s specific working method. Finally, it proposes an interpretation of Cusanus’s reading practices against the background of the critique of book learning and authority that he developed in his works of the period.