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Volume Editors: and
Mester de clerecía is the term traditionally used to designate the first generations of learned poetry in medieval Ibero-Romance dialects (the precursors of modern Castilian and other Romance languages of the Iberian Peninsula). In its time, this poetry was anything but traditional. These long poems of structured verse reappropriate the heroic past through the retelling of legends from Classical Antiquity, saints’ lives, miracle stories, Biblical apocrypha, and other tales. At the same time, the poems recast the place of their authors, and learned characters within their stories, in the shifting dynamics of their thirteenth and fourteenth century present.
Contributors are Pablo Ancos, Maria Cristina Balestrini, Fernando Baños Vallejo, Andrew M. Beresford, Olivier Biaggini, Martha M. Daas, Emily C. Francomano, Ryan Giles, Michelle M. Hamilton, Anthony John Lappin, Clara Pascual-Argente, Connie L. Scarborough, Donald W. Wood, and Carina Zubillaga.
Volume Editor:
What is center and periphery? How can centers and peripheries be recognized by their ontological and axiological features? How does the axiological saturation of a literary field condition aesthetics? How did these factors transform center-periphery relationships to the former metropolises of Romance literatures of the Americas and Africa? What are the consequences of various deperipheralization contexts and processes for poetics? Using theoretical sections and case studies, this book surveys and investigates the limits of globalization. Through explorations of the intercultural dynamics, the aesthetic contributions of former peripheries are examined in terms of the transformative nature of peripheries on centralities.
El interés que han suscitado y suscitan las diferentes variedades del español peninsular e hispanoamericanas lo demuestra la abundante bibliografía en donde han sido descritas y catalogadas desde principios del siglo XX hasta el momento actual. Sin embargo, hoy en día, la sociolingüística y la pragmática deben sumarse a la dialectología para considerar nuevas perspectivas de estudio en torno a un hecho lingüístico: así, las variables como el sexo, el nivel de estudios, la edad, así como las nociones de prestigio y prestigio encubierto, deben ser elementos claves a la hora describir los distintos tipos de interacciones y actos lingüísticos.

Al mismo tiempo, las variedades del español no sólo deben tratarse desde el ámbito lingüístico y literario, sino que su alcance puede ser abordado desde otras disciplinas; se propone, pues, en este volumen un novedoso y completo análisis del español y su diversidad, que incluyen el prisma de la lingüística, sociolingüística y pragmática; las lenguas en contacto; la traducción e interpretación y la didáctica de nuestra lengua como idioma extranjero.

El estudio es diverso y variado, como el propio español, pero muestra una relación constante entre las diferentes disciplinas presentadas.


The interest that the different varieties of Peninsular and Latin American Spanish have aroused and continue to arouse is demonstrated by the abundant bibliography in which they have been described and catalogued from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. However, nowadays, it is essential to associate dialectology with sociolinguistics and pragmatics, in order to consider new perspectives of study around a linguistic fact: variables such as sex, level of education, age and the notions of prestige and covert prestige must be key elements when describing the different types of interactions and linguistic acts.

At the same time, the varieties of Spanish should not only be considered from the linguistic and literary sphere, but their importance can be considered within other disciplines; therefore, this volume proposes a novel and complete analysis of Spanish and its diversity, combining the prism of linguistics, sociolinguistics and pragmatics, languages in contact, translation and interpretation, and the didactics of Spanish as a foreign language.

The study is diverse and varied, like the Spanish language itself, but shows a constant relationship between the different disciplines presented.

Abstract

While for some Maghrebi authors, French represented a language imposed by colonization, for others, it was an opportunity for emancipation, giving them the chance to express themselves and establish themselves as writers in the literary world. In his autobiographical novel Tattooed Memory (1971), Moroccan writer Abdelkébir Khatibi showed ways to reconcile the divided identities that inhabit him. Using the novel’s incipit and its distinct “Maghrebization” of French, this subchapter shows ways in which Maghrebi authors expressing the Self in French have tried to connect all their Selves and transform them into a convincing authorial gesture.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa
Author:

Abstract

This subchapter characterizes the deperipheralization dynamics of three American Francophone spaces: Quebec, Haiti, and Martinique, including the fundamental differences among them resulting from anthropological and historical constraints. The analyses trace a number of constants: the evolution of language and authority over language, the building of public institutions (schools and universities, theaters, libraries), the development of magazine and book markets (periodicals, book publishing, criticism), and the impact of deperipheralization processes on aesthetics and aesthetic concepts. In this comparison of these three Francophone literary fields, differences among them are highlighted: Quebec literature has constituted its own centrality and has become a reference absorption point for a number of peripheries; regarding the autonomy of Haitian literature, the field remains somewhat fragmented among Haiti, Quebec, the USA and France; Martinique and Antillean literature, which is asserted mainly within the framework of Parisian centrality as a specific part of the French understanding of Francophonie, appears to be the least autonomous.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa

Abstract

This subchapter presents a brief outline of Angolan and Mozambican literatures of the 20th century. The focus is on major literary movements, authors and works as well as a number of contemporary tendencies.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa

Abstract

This subchapter investigates the deperipheralization of Cuban-American aesthetics by analyzing Achy Obejas’ novel Memory Mambo. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, which symbolized a rupture leading to the creation of new aesthetic and literary practices. In the context of both US Latinx literature and Cuban insular literature, Cuban-American literature is situated within the transnational republic of letters. Drawing on this interpretation of this novel, it could be argued that both its thematics and poetics display the deperipheralization of the Cuban-American novel within the US literary space.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa

Abstract

This contribution focuses on the reflection of the Caribbean diaspora in the novel Levente no. Yolayorkdominicanyork by the New York-based Dominican artist Josefina Báez. This performative text recreates scenes from the everyday life of a group of Latina women who inhabit a house called Ni é in a Hispanic neighborhood in NYC. At the same time, this place works as a metaphor for a glocal community. The text is studied in relation to postcolonial debates regarding center and periphery as well as the concept of thirdspace. Defined as a radically open space in which communities can develop new principles liberated from the binary categories of identity, thirdspace presents a conceptual grounding attractive for feminist authors such as bell hooks, Gloria Anzaldúa, Diana Fuss and the Spanish economist Amaia Pérez Orozco.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa
Author:

Abstract

This closing chapter highlights a number of points arising from the comparisons and contrasts made in this monograph regarding the different (and as we have seen, intersecting) literary fields and various deperipheralization processes. The issues discussed relate to 1. differences in linguistic differentiation and multilingualism; 2. differences in decolonization and deperipheralization processes; 3. the complex hierarchization of center-periphery relations between/ among cultural complexes; 4. the complex hierarchization of center-periphery relations within cultural complexes; 5. globalization and its relationship to Weltliteratur.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa

Abstract

In Écrire la « parole de nuit ». La nouvelle littérature antillaise (1994), René Depestre embraces certain principles of the Creoleness movement as enshrined in the manifest by Bernabé, Chamoiseau and Confiant in Éloge de la créolité/ In Praise of Creoleness. Selected dimensions of “créolité” are highlighted in two novels by René Depestre Alléluia pour une femme-jardin (1981; Hallelujah for a Woman-Garden, 1995) and Hadriana dans tous mes rêves (1988; Hadriana in all my dreams, 2017), as well as in four novels by Patrick Chamoiseau Chronique des sept misères (1986; Chronicle of the Seven Sorrows, 1999), Solibo Magnifique (1988; Solibo Magnificent, 1999), Texaco (1992; English translation 1997) and L’Esclave vieil homme et le Molosse (1997; Slave Old Man, 2018). The analyses prominently feature the figure of the narrator. The study also aims to present the creolisms, compounds, and neologisms used by Chamoiseau and to compare them with the Haitian expressions of Depestre’s novels. The relation to Creoles and the so-called “French norm” of the center will be explored. The language and center-periphery relationship of René Depestre is compared to the perspectives of Patrick Chamoiseau, through which the attitudes towards the literary center of each author are contrasted.

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa