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Abstract

This qualitative study examines how guided curation develops practicing teachers’ task perception as a dimension of integrated STEM teacher identity. Task perception is defined as teachers’ beliefs about their roles and responsibilities as integrated STEM educators. Analysis of teachers’ (n = 22) guided curation assignments from a graduate STEM education course revealed how teachers perceived their roles and responsibilities as integrated STEM educators and potential challenges to integrating STEM. These beliefs included the importance of centering the engineering design process, encouraging collaborative problem solving, providing productive mistake-making opportunities, and connecting mathematics and engineering. Teacher educators’ adaptation of a freely available STEM lesson specification tool scaffolded the collection and analysis of curriculum resources. This adaptation was instrumental in developing task perception. Implications for building elementary teachers’ capacity to implement and sustain innovative integrated STEM instruction are offered.

In: Research in Integrated STEM Education

Abstract

This article delves into the significance of bodily experiences in the context of outdoor STEAM activities. It features a case study involving three tenth-grade students who engage in outdoor tasks – which are part of an outdoor STEAM trail – using the MathCityMap app. The research focuses on the students’ emerging strategies when dealing with two modelling tasks by integrating the modelling cycle phases with a perspective on embodiment that encompasses learning as navigating mathematical places. By intertwining these theoretical stances, the analysis uncovers the students’ strategies and seeks to describe their orientations during the experience. Despite the students not reaching the expected solutions, they bodily engage with the modelling tasks in meaningful ways, employing an array of various strategies. Trying to overcome the separation between domains, classically emphasised in the modelling context, the authors show how bodily engagement operates at their intersection and discuss the relevance of their approach for STEAM activities.

In: Research in Integrated STEM Education
Free access
In: Research in Integrated STEM Education

Abstract

This article presents design-based research to explore the potential of integrating STEAM education and the Sustainable Development Goals into a project-based learning experience to address the lack of access to water in Argentine Patagonia. The study, which was conducted at a rural school in the region of Patagonia, with 13-year-old students, focused on designing, constructing, and installing a solar-powered irrigation system. The article discusses benefits of combining project-based learning, mathematical modelling, and outdoor STEAM education to provide students with an engaging and comprehensive learning experience in STEM subjects. The authors highlight the need to restructure the school organisation to integrate interdisciplinary approaches to address real-life problems. It also emphasises the importance of contextual restrictions and how they can be used as didactic variables to motivate the use of rationality in problem-solving. Experience reports provide insights into STEAM-based education’s potential to foster students’ critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, and collaboration skills.

In: Research in Integrated STEM Education
Volume Editors: and
In the last decade, programming and computational thinking (CT) have been introduced on a large scale in school curricula and standards all over the world. In countries such as the UK, a new school subject—computing—was created, whereas in countries such as Sweden, programming was included in existing subjects, notably mathematics and technology education. The introduction of programming and CT in technology education implies a particular relationship between programming and technology. Programming is usually performed with technological artefacts—various types of computers—and it can also be seen as a specific branch of engineering.

This book analyses the background to and current implementation of programming and computational thinking in a Swedish school technology context, in relation to international developments. The various chapters deal with pertinent issues in technology education and its relation to computers and computing, for example, computational thinking and literacy, teachers’ programming competence, and computational thinking, programming, and learning in technology education. The book includes examples from educational research that could also be used as inspiration for school teaching, teacher education and curriculum development.
Free access
In: Research in Integrated STEM Education

Abstract

Modelling activities serve to integrate real-life objects into STEM classes. This article investigates different settings for modelling with real objects and their representations both inside and outside the classroom. Using the example of mathematics, the settings working outside the classroom at the real object, inside the classroom with photos, and inside the classroom with a 3D model are considered and compared in an explorative study with 29 students. Questionnaire items provide information about the students’ perceptions of the different settings. The results report significant differences in the simplifying and structuring step as well as in the mathematising step when comparing the settings outside and inside with photos. The results are taken up for generating hypotheses concerning the role of the outdoors in interdisciplinary STEM modelling activities.

Open Access
In: Research in Integrated STEM Education

Abstract

In this special issue, the topic of Outdoor Education related to an integrated STEM approach is taken into consideration. Three articles focus on theoretical background and practical investigations of education outside the classroom. The issue aims at contributing to further research on the topic and providing an overview of activities that strengthen the link between the STEM disciplines and the students’ environment.

Free access
In: Research in Integrated STEM Education

Abstract

This study examines STEAM learning outside the classroom: necessary preparations, how students cope with ‘mobile learning’, and how motivation changes while working on problem-based STEAM tasks. Further, the authors provide examples of tasks without and with technology support, and compare two mobile applications, Actionbound and MathCityMap, supporting outdoor math trails. The study started in 2017 by collecting data based on observations about students’ motivation and views on outdoor mathematics and has been carried on ever since by collecting data mainly from lower secondary school classes involving 90 students. As the authors also gave workshops on STEAM to pre-service teachers, they questioned the participants (a group of 13) about their experiences with STEAM, technology, and outdoor mathematics. The authors found that ‘mobile learning’ and STEAM tasks enhance students’ motivations, however, pre-service teachers have little experience and may need more support during their studies to implement STEAM and technology, hence the authors aim to design such courses.

In: Research in Integrated STEM Education

Abstract

During the last years, the arrival of new technologies facilitated STEAM integration in real-world learning situations, e.g., GPS-based software and mixed realities allow us to combine the virtual and real world to increase our understanding of complex knowledge. Based on these technologies, the authors designed several teaching practices by creating STEAM trails in an outdoor learning environment, integrating architecture in place-based learning approaches that are likely to occur with architecture connected to arts, culture, history and mathematics. However, the complexity of STEAM-integrated teacher practices within real-world situations is challenging. In this conceptual article, the authors will present and discuss the designed teaching practices, stress possible hindrances and chances for their integration into teaching and discuss further research opportunities. This study may be of interest to educators, curriculum developers and policy makers to promote outdoor teaching practices in integrated STEAM trails.

In: Research in Integrated STEM Education