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Three Generations of Chinese Trotskyists in Defeat, Jail, Exile, and Diaspora
Editors / Translators: and
With an introduction by Gregor Benton.

The Longest Night tells the story of Chinese Trotskyism in its later years, including after Mao Zedong's capture of Beijing in 1949. It treats the three ages of Chinese Trotskyism: the founding generation around Chen Duxiu, Zheng Chaolin, Wang Fanxi, and Peng Shuzhi, who joined the Opposition after their expulsion from the Chinese Communist Party (CCP); the first generation of those who (after 1931) did not first pass through the ranks of the CCP before becoming Trotskyists; and those who became Trotskyists after 1949, mainly in Hong Kong and the diaspora.
Local Councils and People’s Assemblies in Korea, 1567–1894
Author:
Translator:
Eugene Y. Park’s annotated translation of a long-awaited book by Kim Ingeol introduces Anglophone readers to a path-breaking scholarship on the widening social base of political actors who shaped “public opinion” (kongnon) in early modern Korea. Initially limited to high officials, the articulators of public opinion as the state and elites recognized expanded to accommodate mid-level civil officials, State Confucian College students, all Confucian literati (yurim), influential commoners who took over local councils (hyanghoe), and the general population. Marshaling evidence from a wealth of documents, Kim presents a compelling case for the indigenous origins of Korean democracy.
Editors: and
With China’s economic boom, continuous political stability, and increasing influence, it is time to ask if the trajectories of the Chinese Revolution--its troubled interaction with the world market, its national independence movements, its pursuit of egalitarianism, communism, and socialism, and its post-socialist reform—could be understood as a meaningful and consistent historical experience. It is important now to see how China’s past efforts have contributed or obstructed its progress since the Qing empire was thrust into the international system of nation-states in the late 19th century. This series aims to place the study of China in the contexts of the international system of nation-states, global capitalist and market expansion, imperialist rivalry, the Cold War, and recent waves of economic globalization. It welcomes analytical attempts to frame intellectual, historical, and cultural analysis conducive to dialectical relations between these categories. Ideas will not be studied in the abstract but be set in motion and intertwined with praxis through analysis of historical contexts and enriched by close analysis of aesthetic texts, such as literature, narratives, and phenomena of everyday life.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Stephanie Carta and Masja Horn.

Please see our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. All submissions are subject to a double-anonymous peer review process prior to publication.
Author:

Abstract

This essay, based on a 2022 plenary presentation at the International Society for the Study of Overseas Chinese conference, details the state of anti-Asian American racism from 2020 through 2022. First, it describes the nature and extent of the discrimination. While the media presented the issue as one of hate crimes, the vast majority of hate incidents involved verbal harassment and shunning/avoidance. Second, it reviews the sources of the surge in racism. Political rhetoric and social media re-ignited Yellow Peril fears, leading to the scapegoating of Asians in the US for COVID-19. Third, it considers the traumatizing impact of this spate of racism. In particular, Asian Americans have suffered severe economic distress, have borne the disproportionate brunt of exclusionary public policies, and have been traumatized by the violence of the past three years. The essay concludes with how the Asian American community has resisted with the largest panethnic movement in its history.

In: Journal of Chinese Overseas
In: Journal of Chinese Overseas
Author:

Abstract

South Africa is one of few African countries that is home to three distinct Chinese communities: multi-generational Chinese South African, Taiwanese South African, and newer migrants from mainland China. The presence of ethnic Chinese in South Africa from three distinct eras of migration provides an opportunity to: (1) observe the diversity as well as the ebbs and flows of current Chinese migration to South Africa; (2) examine shifts in Chinese (and South African) identity and their understandings of Chineseness over time; and (3) explore the possibilities of contemporary pan-Chinese community formation. This paper describes the three distinct communities; provides a detailed update on the economic, socio-cultural, and political developments within the newer Chinese migrant communities in South Africa; explores migration ebbs and flows; describes local identity formations; and attempts to identify shifts in Chinese state views on ethnic Chinese in South Africa.

In: Journal of Chinese Overseas
Author:

Abstract

The Chinese Question is about the origins of Chinese diasporic communities in the West; the rise of the racist movements and exclusion legislation passed against them; and the struggles of the Chinese emigrants for respect and equal treatment, both in China itself and in the international community. Chinese exclusion policies across the Anglo-American world showed the importance of domestic racism in the formation of nation-state identities. At another level, they were also integral to the development of the late nineteenth century ascent of Great Britain and the U.S. as global economic hegemons, as creditors and as colonizers, as nation builders and as empire builders. Because China was never formally colonized, the Western powers imposed unequal treaties and exclusion laws as instruments of colonialism and containment. Exclusion policies were integral dynamics of colonialism and capitalism; part of a new way of imagining, organizing, and governing the world.

In: Journal of Chinese Overseas