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In Relational Iconography: Representational Culture at the Qaraquyunlu and Aqquyunlu Courts (853 / 1449 CE to 907 / 1501 CE), Georg Leube engages with courtly representation from an iconographical perspective, tracing the intersecting agencies of courtly actors negotiating multiple normativities and traditions. While the courtly culture of the Qaraquyunlu and Aqquyunlu dynasties (15th century C.E.) is commonly interpreted as an intermezzo in Persianate and Islamicate cultural history, it is here framed as an ideal field to explore a relational approach that challenges established dichotomies and ideal types.
By reading multiple mediums and discourses into each other, Georg Leube shows how courtly performance is rooted in iconographical repertoires that resonated with different networks and groups inside the 'Turkmen' realms.
Sunni-Shia relations in Iran offer an analytical guide for the interpretation of inequality, securitization, and immigration. This book reorients our understanding of contemporary Iran by answering still unacknowledged questions: how is the relationship, the interaction and socio-political behaviour between the Islamic Republic and its Sunni minorities? Using unexamined sources and fieldwork, Hessam Habibi Doroh shows a clear insight into the life of Iranian Sunnis, their contention and cooperation with the state during Hasan Rouhani´s presidency. Comparison with the wider region complements this nuanced portrayal of impacts of privatization, secularization, and securitization on the sectarian relations between the state and its minorities.
Volume Editors: and
Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History 20 (CMR 20), covering Iran, Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous new and leading scholars, CMR 20, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a fundamental tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section Editors: Ines Aščerić-Todd, Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabé Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Diego Melo Carrasco, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Cornelia Soldat, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel.
Series Editors: and
The series Corpus Avesticum is designed to provide a forum for new editions of Avestan texts. It includes works by different authors on the transmission of the Avesta and editions of Avestan texts and their exegesis in Pahlavi and Sanskrit. The editions will be based on a fresh collation of the manuscripts available today and on a critical analysis of the manuscript tradition. Editions would vary according to the focus individual authors have chosen for their work.
The series comprises three types of works. The first type would be editions of the ritual Avesta. They provide the Avestan text of complete rituals together with a text-critical apparatus. The second type comprises editions of the Avestan, Pahlavi or Sanskrit versions of a text with translation, commentary and dictionary of that particular text. Depending on the size of the text, the edition would be either of a complete text, or of a constituent part of a larger text (such as, for example, part of the Yasna). The third type comprises analyses of the history and dependencies of the manuscripts.
C.A. Storey’s Persian Literature: A Bio-Bibliographical Survey is the most authoritative reference work on the Persian written tradition, offering the names of authors and the titles of those of their works that have survived in the Persian language. Storey’s work is for the Persian manuscript tradition what Brockelmann’s is for the Arab world.
Volume I.1: Qurʾānic Literature, History, and Biography
Volume I.2: Biography, Additions, and Corrections
Volume II: Mathematics; Weights, and Measures; Astronomy, and Astrology; Geography; Medicine; Encyclopaedias, and Miscellanies; Arts and Crafts, Science, Occult Arts
Volume III: Lexicography; Grammar; Prosody, and Poetics; Rhetoric, Riddles, and Chronograms; Ornate Prose; Proverbs: Tales
Volume IV: Law; Tradition; Religion, Sufism, Baha’ism, Prayers; Hinduism; Translations from Sanskrit, Hindi, and other Indian Languages, Ethics; Philosophy; Logic
Volume V: Poetry of the Pre-Mongol Period

Abstract

The article discusses Bhāviveka’s Prajñāpradīpavṛtti and Avalokitavrata’s Prajñāpradīpaṭīkā commentaries on the “not without a cause” (nāpy ahetutaḥ) alternative of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā 1.1ab, from which it emerges that at least two distinct theories of causality can be attributed to the Lokāyata school. The first one is a physicalist theory that confines all causal relations within the sphere of material elements and is assimilated to accidentalism. The second one is a naturalist theory that attributes causal power to inner nature (svabhāva). The paper discusses the theoretical differences between these two approaches, considers Bhāviveka’s and Avalokitavrata’s counter-arguments and concludes that some of the conjectures that modern scholars have put forward on the relation between svabhāvavāda, accidentalism and Lokāyata should be revised.

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In: Indo-Iranian Journal
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In: Indo-Iranian Journal
In: Indo-Iranian Journal
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The Encyclopædia Iranica is dedicated to the study of Iranian civilization in the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent. It also includes scholarly articles related to the reciprocal influences between Persia and its neighbors, extending from pre-history to the present. The disciplines represented include: anthropology, archaeology, geography, art history, ethnology, sociology, economics, history of religion, philosophy, mysticism, history of science and medicine, Islamic history, botany, zoology, folklore, development of agriculture and industry, political science, international relations, and diplomatic history.
Fascicle 3 of Volume XVII (pp. 225-336) starts with the entry "King of the Benighted--Kingship II. in the Achaemenid Empire" and ends with "Kokand Khanate." The 112 new pages of the Encyclopædia Iranica project reflect the latest developments in the field of Iranian studies.
Vol. V, Section 4: Persia and Its Kings, Part II
Al-Maqrīzī's (d. 845/1442) last work, al-Ḫabar ʿan al-bašar, was completed a year before his death. This volume, edited by Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila, covers the history of pre-Islamic Iran during the Sasanian period and the conquest. Al-Maqrīzī's work shows how Arab historians integrated Iran into world history and how they harmonised various currents of historiography (Middle Persian historiography, Islamic sacred history, Greek and Latin historiography).

This part harmonises the versions of Miskawayh's Tağārib, al-Ṭabarī’s Taʾrīḫ, and several other sources, producing a fluent narrative of Iran from the early 3rd century until 651. It also includes the complete text of ʿAhd Ardašīr, here translated for the first time into English.