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Interactions between society, biodiversity and water in a humid tropical forest
This book examines interactions between human communities and the global biodiversity that is sheltered by the Salonga National Park. While not being a review of research that has been on-going in the Salonga National Park over several years now, the book takes a bird-eye perspective to look at how the forests, waters and species that occur in the wider Salonga landscape interact to give birth to what the Salonga National Park is. As such, the book treats of the Salonga’s wildlife, its forests and waters, and the Salonga National Park’s contemporary human history, within the regional framework.
Universal Model of Water Resources Management
Comparative Methods and Global Case Studies
Author:
Volume Editors: , , and
This interdisciplinary volume provides a comprehensive and rich analysis of the century-long socio-ecological transformation of Lake Naivasha, Kenya. Major globalised processes of agricultural intensification, biodiversity conservation efforts, and natural-resource extraction have simultaneously manifested themselves in this one location.

These processes have roots in the colonial period and have intensified in the past decades, after the establishment of the cut-flower industry and the geothermal-energy industry. The chapters in this volume exemplify the multiple, intertwined socio-environmental crises that consequently have played out in Naivasha in the past and the present, and that continue to shape its future.
Author:
Selenium (Se) is an essential dietary trace element participating in the regulation of various physiological functions in humans and farm animals through its incorporation into a range of selenoproteins. Low Se content in main feed ingredients is a common problem worldwide and dietary Se supplementation is a current practice in ruminant nutrition. Recent research clearly proved that sodium selenite, used for the last 50 years as a feed supplement, is not an optimal form of Se. However, use of organic selenium in dairy and beef diets can help meet Se requirement and maintain health/high immunocompetence, productive and reproductive performance.

The goal of this book is to provide up-to-date information about the roles of Se in ruminant nutrition and health. A special emphasis is given to the role of selenium as an essential part of the integrated antioxidant system. The concept of using organic Se in ruminant nutrition is described in detail with emphasis on selenomethionine as a storage form of Se in the body. Also, specific Se deficiency-related disorders in ruminants are described and the importance of Se in growth, development, immunity and reproduction is demonstrated. Molecular mechanisms of protective effects of Se under stressful conditions of commercial milk and meat production are characterized.

This book will be of practical importance to dairy and beef producers, to nutritionists and vets as well as for animal scientists, students of agricultural colleges and universities. It will also be of interest for researchers in areas related to environmental sciences, food sciences, physiology, etc.

Abstract

Locusts have high nutritional value and are considered alternative protein sources for humans and animals. Diet can strongly affect the nutritional composition of insects. In this study, the influences of diets – wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings and rape (Brassica napus) leaves – on the chemical composition and amino acids of the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) were assessed. The crude protein, soluble carbohydrate and triglyceride were analyzed using the Bradford method, anthrone colorimetry, and glycerol kinase chromogenic method, respectively. Additionally, amino acids were determined using cation exchange chromatography. The study revealed that wheat seedlings had lower water content than rape leaves. Although the crude protein content was comparable, the soluble carbohydrates of wheat seedlings were approximately 2.5 times higher than those of rape leaves. The body weight (fresh weight and dry weight), crude protein and triglyceride of locusts significantly increased when fed wheat seedlings compared with when fed rape leaves, with values of 48.08%, 31.58%, 43.83% and 25.00%, respectively. The high water content of rape leaves resulted in the high water content of rape leaf-fed locusts. Plants also affect the amino acid composition of locusts. The eight amino acids (four essential amino acids and four non-essential amino acids) and the total amino acids of rape leaf-fed locusts were significantly enhanced compared with those of wheat seedlings. The essential amino acid index and biological value indicate that the protein quality of locusts fed rape leaves has been significantly improved. These results demonstrate that the nutritional composition of L. migratoria can be altered by manipulating the diet. Insects with controllable nutrients can be provided by insect farms and further studies will improve the development of insects as food or feed.

In: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed
Author:

Abstract

“The Future of Agriculture” by Aidan Connolly offers a fast-paced and insightful exploration of how technology is transforming the agriculture and food production system. Drawing from nearly 50 articles and essays that Connolly has published in recent years, it covers a wide range of topics. The book provides a pragmatic perspective, acknowledging both the positive and negative consequences of evolving technology and serves as a resource for understanding the current state and connecting it to various players in the industry and sector.

Open Access
In: International Food and Agribusiness Management Review

Abstract

With the dynamic and complex changes in the farmers’ living environment and the vigorous development of entrepreneurial activities worldwide, farmer entrepreneurship is experiencing rapid growth. However, whether farmer entrepreneurship enhances the welfare of farmers’ families demands further scrutiny. Utilizing data from the Chinese Family Tracking Survey and drawing on Amartya Sen’s capability approach, this article formulates a farmer family welfare evaluation index system to comprehensively assess the impact of farmer entrepreneurship on farmer families. The research findings reveal the following: (1) Entrepreneurship contributes to enhancing the welfare of farmer families, with entrepreneurial farmer families experiencing higher welfare levels than their non-entrepreneurial counterparts. (2) Farmer entrepreneurship falls short of delivering complete welfare improvements to farmers’ families. While various welfare conditions, such as family economics, social security, living conditions, and psychological conditions, have improved after starting a business, health welfare has seen a decline. (3) Farmland transfer significantly influences the process of farmer entrepreneurship, directly fostering the family welfare of entrepreneurial farmers. (4) Farmers’ entrepreneurial behavior yields greater welfare benefits for the new generation, farmers with higher education levels, and those situated in the central region. Building on these findings, this study proposes relevant improvement suggestions to offer robust support for policy considerations.

Open Access
In: International Food and Agribusiness Management Review