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Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age shows how two Black-edited periodical publications in the early decades of the nineteenth century worked towards emancipation through medium-specific interventions across material and immaterial lines. More concretely, this book proposes an archipelagic framework for understanding the emancipatory struggles of the Antiguan Weekly Register in St. John’s and the Jamaica Watchman in Kingston. Complicating the prevalent narrative about the Register and the Watchman as organs of the free people of color, this book continues to explore the heterogeneity and evolution of Black newspaper print on the liberal spectrum. As such, Early African Caribbean Newspapers makes the case that the Register and the Watchman participated in shaping the contemporary communication market in the Caribbean. To do so, this study engages deeply with both the textuality and materiality of the newspaper and presents fresh visual material.
In: Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age
In: Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age
In: Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age
In: Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age
In: Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age
Insights into Latinx Identity in the Twenty-First Century
In Latinidad at the Crossroad: Insights into Latinx identity in the Twenty-First Century Gerke and González Rodríguez provide flashing glimpses into the ways in which Latinas/os struggle to forge their multiracial and multicultural identities within their own communities and in mainstream U.S. society. This volume encompasses an interdisciplinary perspective on the complex range of latinidades that confronts stereotypical connotations, and simultaneously advocates a more flexible (re)definition that may overcome static collective representations of identity, ethnicity and belonging. Well-positioned in the current political context, the notion of latinidad is examined as a complex sociological phenomenon of identity-construction which is affected by outside influences and is used as a powerful linguistic, cultural and ideological weapon to denounce oppression and deconstruct stereotypes. Including chapters from foundational and influential scholars, this collection moves towards a dynamic exploration of how Latinx are remapping their identity positions in twenty-first century America.

Contributors: Francisco A. Lomelí, José Antonio Gurpegui, Esther Álvarez López, Ylce Irizarry, Luisa María González Rodríguez, Ewa Antoszek, Fernando Aquino.

Abstract

This essay brings the Chicano canon back into focus and explores the elements that contribute to current developments in latinidad from the inception of the cannon to its current state by reformulating the understanding of it at the border and also through the recent lens of the Trump administration. By contending that the victory of Donald Trump in the 2016 elections changed the political landscape of the U. S. and created a double-space of Hispanic presence at the border and beyond, this chapter explores how these politics seep into the literature of a community who were made protagonists of Trump’s policies. Thus, this chapter not only situates the Hispanic presence in the new social context of the United States by revisiting three canonical authors (Rivera, Barrios and Morales) in light of the new sociological, political, and cultural moment, but it also explores the cultural and theoretical conceptions that are birthed at the border in order to permit a deeper understanding of postmodernity and interculturalism and create new realities, spaces, intersections, and perspectives of self-representation, self-identification, and pluralism.

In: Latinidad at the Crossroads
In: Latinidad at the Crossroads