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Addressing Zionists in 1923, the British artist C. R. Ashbee spoke of “that preposterous Balfour Declaration whose Arabic tail you people perpetually ignore, but the lash of which you will some day feel.” His warnings received no attention at the time, nor has his radical pro-Arab Palestinian political position been researched since. One hundred years later, this art historical study asks what possibilities individual colonial actors had to influence official colonial policy. In the example of Jerusalem under British rule, Moya Tönnies analyses how three members of the British administration, Ashbee, architect Ernest Tatham Richmond, and governor Ronald Storrs, all three identifying with the International Arts and Crafts Movement, used art as a diplomatic sphere for their British colonial anti-Zionist interventions.
The series Documenta Coranica is dedicated to the study of history of the Qurʾānic text as manifested in manuscripts and other sources. Documenta Coranica publishes witnesses of the Qurʾān from the early period in the shape of facsimile, accompanied by transcription and a commentary. The series makes codices on parchment, papyri, inscriptions, variant readings and other relevant sources for the history of the Qurʾān, accessible to the academic public. The first volumes contain manuscript fragments from Sanaa (DAM 01-25.1, DAM 01-27.1, DAM 01-29.1), the manuscript Ma VI 165 (Tübingen), and the codex Or. 2165 of the British Library.

The series comprises two sections: Manuscripta contains facsimile editions of Qurʾānic manuscripts with a line-by-line transcript in Modern Arabic script on the opposite page and a commentary about codicology, paleography, variant readings and verse numbering explaining content and characteristics of each manuscript. Testimonia et Studia contains studies about material evidence for the history of the Qurʾān, as manifested on papyrus, stone and rock inscriptions etc., as well in exegetical, narrative and philological sources.

Documenta Coranica inscribes itself into a German-French cooperation: in the framework of the research project Coranica, 2011-2014, and Paleocoran 2015-2018, both funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Agence Nationale de la Recherche.
This book discusses the printers’ devices used in Poland-Lithuania in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The compositions that served to identify the products of individual printers are explored here as previously unacknowledged research material for cultural studies: they allow for the reconstruction of the mentality of contemporary printers as well as their co-workers and reading public.

The book investigates relationships within early modern intellectual communities and shows that the textual and visual discourses of the printers’ devices were pan-European, reflecting the networked communities of European centres of learning and commerce. It documents the broad range of the output of Polish-Lithuanian presses as well and is therefore also a study of book culture in a multinational and multilingual state, whose inheritance is poorly recognised internationally.

Abstract

This article deals with Sibylla Schwarz’ poetic confrontation with the literary authority of the early 17th century par excellence. In Martin Opitz, she not only found a model to follow, but also a point of orientation for her own approach to writing, which is why she productively transforms his material and texts, but develops her own forms and arguments in this imitation. She repeatedly addresses him explicitly as an ally in matters of poetry and the implementation of poetic guidelines, who, like herself, had to overcome resistance. Both his texts and his personality are appreciated in this context and integrated into her own writing. In doing so, she follows Opitz in a strategy propagated by himself and thus continues it.

In: Daphnis
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In: Daphnis
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Abstract

The night plays an important role in Sibylla Schwarz’ self-presentation as a female poet. On the one hand, she expresses her poetic skills by using the night as a literary motif which she combines with metaphors of farewell and death. On the other hand, she presents the night as the time and place of the creation of her poetry, thereby marking it as a secondary activity accepted within the gender discourse of early modern culture. Schwarz’ use of the motif of the night vividly illustrates the interplay of convention, strategy and lifeworld reference that is characteristic of her poetry.

In: Daphnis
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Abstract

Research has so far argued that Anna Maria van Schurman is the Dutch poet to whom Sibylla Schwarz alludes in her poem “Ein Gesang wieder den Neidt”. This article not only argues that Schwarz was rather alluding to the Dutch poet Anna Roemers Visscher; it also discusses what significance the openness of Dutch poetry towards female authors could have had for a young female poet in Germany.

In: Daphnis
In: Daphnis

Abstract

This article discusses the relationship of Sibylla Schwarz’ poem Verachtung der Welt and its Dutch source: passages from Jacob Cats’ book Houwelyck (1625), a kind of guide to marriage for the Dutch bourgeoisie. Previous research was not able to identify this source, partly because Schwarz takes a very unique approach with her adaptation. A comparative analysis of the texts brings Schwarz’ translation strategies into the foreground, which in turn demands a reevaluation of conclusions and assumptions about her work that until now have gone mostly unquestioned. The comparative analysis also reveals how skillfully Schwarz was able to make use of the Early Modern ‘spaces’ of translation, as she inscribes a new poetic dimension into Cats’ text.

In: Daphnis
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Abstract

This article examines the link between politics and poetry in Sibylla Schwarz’ work. In various texts, the author negotiates socio-political discourses on the hierarchical society, the position and appreciation of poets, as well as on her self-image as a woman and as a female writer. Poetry and the creation of poetry permeate her texts on a thematic level. Literature, however, is also her tool and means of expression with which she challenges injustice and false values and thus inscribes herself in the discourses of her time.

In: Daphnis