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An Alchemist in the Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom
The German physician, alchemist, kabbalist, and theosopher Heinrich Khunrath (ca. 1560–1605) is one of the most remarkable figures in the intellectual history of the Renaissance. His work, combining text and images in a new way, is a fusion of the contemporary currents of thought in which alchemy went hand-in-hand with philosophy and Lutheran heterodox theology. As a follower of Paracelsus, Khunrath was in search of both the secrets of nature and and the knowledge of God -- the “theosophy”. This
Series:  Aries Book Series
This is a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
Prologue: Bio-Bibliography and Introduction to Khunrath’s Images
This is the 1st volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
This is the 2nd volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
This is the 3rd volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
Epilogue: Reception (from Rosicrucians to Modern Occulture) & Bibliography
This is the 4th volume in a 4-volume work entitled The Mage’s Images. The work provides the first in-depth examination of the life and works of Heinrich Khunrath (1560-1605), ‘one of the great Hermetic philosophers’, whose Amphitheatre of Eternal Wisdom (1595/1609) has been described as ‘one of the most important books in the whole literature of theosophical alchemy and the occult sciences’. Khunrath is best known for his novel combination of ‘scripture and picture’ in the complex engravings in his Amphitheatre. In this richly illustrated monograph, Forshaw analyses occult symbolism, with previously unpublished material, offering insight into Khunrath’s insistence on the necessary combination of alchemy, magic, and cabala in ‘Oratory and Laboratory’.
Polemic and Piety in The Divine Trinunity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (1650)
Sergiej S. Slavinski presents the first major study of Francis Cheynell's 1650 treatise on the doctrine of the Trinity. Situating Cheynell in his historical context, Slavinski examines Cheynell's role in the Trinitarian controversies of the Civil War and Interregnum England. The book demonstrates the interplay between polemic and piety in a work of Reformed scholasticism, showcasing how Cheynell’s eclectic theological method in reading Scripture reinforced his conviction of the Trinitarian persons as one true God. Slavinski argues that Cheynell’s polemical-practical Trinitarianism has the idea of Trinitarian oneness as infinite simplicity at its core.
Proceedings of the Eighteenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Leuven 2022)
Volume Editors: and
Every third year, the members of the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies (IANLS) assemble for a week-long conference. Over the years, this event has evolved into the largest single conference in the field of Neo-Latin studies. The papers presented at these conferences offer, then, a general overview of the current status of Neo-Latin research; its current trends, popular topics, and methodologies.
In 2022, the members of IANLS gathered for a conference in Leuven where 50 years ago the first of these congresses took place.This volume presents the conference’s papers which were submitted after the event and which have undergone a peer-review process.
The papers deal with a broad range of fields, including literature, history, philology, and religious studies.

Abstract

Secondo le testimonianze disponibili (soprattutto epistolari), il rapporto fra l’umanista camaldolese Ambrogio Traversari (1386–1439) e Cosimo de’ Medici (1389–1464) fu caratterizzato da una dinamica di tipo clientelare ed ebbe modo di manifestarsi sotto vari aspetti: da quello culturale a quello economico, da quello sociale a quello politico. Cosimo, infatti, attraverso le sue ingenti risorse e la sua influenza politica, sostenne Ambrogio tanto nella sua attività culturale di umanista, quanto nella sua azione di generale e riformatore dell’ordine camaldolese e di uomo di Chiesa. Per parte sua, anche Ambrogio si adoperò a favore del Medici quando fu necessario, ad esempio, durante la prigionia e l’esilio di Cosimo. Un’eccezionale testimonianza del rapporto fra i due è costituita, infine, dal ms. Laurenziano Strozzi 102, contenente la silloge epistolare traversariana realizzata dal monaco Michele su incarico e con l’aiuto di Cosimo qualche anno dopo la morte di Traversari. Infatti, l’operazione culturale alle spalle di tale silloge sembra finalizzata a ribadire da parte di Cosimo l’appartenenza della figura dell’umanista e riformatore Traversari al milieu mediceo.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Lovaniensis

Abstract

This article introduces and discusses the ideological program of a motif identified by the author in humanistic mournful poetry. The motif was intended to commemorate the deceased eminent poet and referred to the epic tradition of introducing heroes into a special place in the Elysian Fields, hence the proposed name for it is amicitia elysea. The article focuses on what is presumed to be the first example of the motif, i.e., Carlo Marsuppini’s epicedium for Leonardo Bruni. The description of the Elysium inhabited by successive generations of scholars and poets here turns into a praise of Florence, which under the Medici rule resembled Paradise. First, the stages in the development of both the idea itself and the poetic form it took are discussed, starting from Greek literature through Roman and Medieval vernacular (Dante) to the form it assumed in the Elegia de morte Leonardi Aretini. This form of the motif was soon developed by the followers. Then, the exploitation of the amicitia elysea motif for political purposes is addressed. It is argued that the motif served to consolidate the power of the Medici and the position of the humanists as a professional group with a specific intellectual formation based on Classical education.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Lovaniensis