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The Canadian Pentecostal Experience includes eighteen essays organized into three themes: 1) Historiography and Early Canadian Pentecostalism; 2) Theological Practices and Processes; and 3) Social and Cultural Change. This collection makes a significant contribution to the growing literature of global Pentecostal scholarship. The works are important for the Canadian context but as the editors argue in the Introduction, Canadian Pentecostalism is “glocal” (shaped by both local and global realities). This collection will interest readers drawn from the wider field of religious studies and global Pentecostalism to initiate conversations about how Pentecostalism evolves in both its local and global expressions.
Religious Stories Korean American Dreamers Tell in the Face of Uncertainty
Author:
In Undocumented Migration as a Theologizing Experience, Eunil David Cho examines how Korean American undocumented young adults tell religious stories to cope with the violence of uncertainty and construct new meanings for themselves. Based on in-depth interviews guided by narrative inquiry, the book follows the stories of ten Korean American DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients who have found their lives in limbo. While many experience narrative foreclosure, believing “My story is over,” Cho highlights how telling religious stories enables them to imagine and create new stories for themselves not as shunned outsiders, but as beloved children of God.

Abstract

This article argues that the lack of comprehensive scholarly treatments of how the OT speaks about God’s knowability has to do with the complexity of the topic and the diversity of how the OT addresses it. It shows the diverse ways of how previous scholars have approached the OT statements and assumptions about God’s knowability (and the knowledge of God), clarifies how these statements and assumptions are related to each other, and gives some ideas about possible directions of future research.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
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Abstract

In Yorùbá traditional religious beliefs and practices, the role of Àyàn (Drummers) cannot be overstated. For that reason, as scholars of Yoruba art studies, to deny the relevance of Ìlù (Drums) as an indispensable component of Yoruba art and religion is to threaten its deeper understanding. Language is also a vital approach to a deeper understanding of African art. Yoruba art, for instance, is the primary medium through which the Yorùbá philosophy, cultural values, and history are stored and verbally expressed. Thus, a proficiency or nearly competency in the reading, writing, and speaking of the language of the African people whose art we study is vital to a deeper understanding of African art. Also fundamental to a deeper understanding of Yorùbá art is to recognize its unique context that usually embraces a variety of verbal and nonverbal components, which in themselves are works of art. The language of the drum in the Yorùbá Egúngún performative context is a good example. As a native speaker and culture bearer, who is fully aware of the fundamental importance of language in African art studies, the author examines the interconnection of Àyàn and Egúngún from the vantage point of Yorùbá language. The study delves into the root of Egúngún within the Yorùbá cultural context in which the people concretize and validate their thought system in visual and verbal forms. The study provides an overview of Yorùbá drums and their ritual contexts as well as the Yorùbá ontological concept of Egúngún, one of the most valued patrons of Àyàn as an important form of Yorùbá religious beliefs and practices. Using the Egúngún performance in Òkè-Igbó as a case study, the study argues that dance and drum performances can and should be analyzed as a “third dimension” of oríkì, in addition to verbal and the visual of Abiodun’s theoretical framework as demonstrated in his timeless book, Yoruba Art and Language – Seeking the African in African Art (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

Islamic modesty as a cluster of gendered virtues is typically synonymous with ‘modest’ modes of body-concealing attire and comportment. This article argues, however, that the meaning of ‘modesty’ as currently conceptualised to illuminate the contours of corporeal and sartorial piety is wholly inadequate in its inability to evaluate the more ambivalent expressions of modesty beyond dress as a signal of inner virtue. Although the attention on modest or pious fashion as embraced by women the world over has been as a site for redefining the boundaries of moral and public participation, it does not go far enough in reconfiguring the debates on aesthetics and ethics of ambivalence, ambiguity, and contradiction in Muslim society. Based on a textual reading of the public persona of the Malaysian celebrity entrepreneur Dato Vida and interviews with other Malay-Muslim female entrepreneurs of her contemporary, I posit that the elasticity of modesty relates to a similarly flexible, expansive, and explorative conceptualisation of Islam. Related to this conceptualisation, Dato Vida embodies what I call ludic piety in her presentation and performance of gendered pious excesses within the elastic bounds of modesty.

In: Religion and Gender

Abstract

In April 2020 there was an inordinate spike in COVID-19 related deaths in Kano State, northern Nigeria, due to a lack of adherence to the national public health emergency recommendations. This article aims to explain why this public health fiasco occurred. Utilizing secondary academic literature and news reports from local media, the article interrogates the manifestation of Islam in northern Nigeria and the resulting undermining of the country’s coronavirus mitigation response. The evidence from Kano State indicates that religious authorities failed to heed the suspension of congregational prayers as the relevant health agencies advised, due to a belief in the exceptionality of northern Nigeria as a theocratic substate in a secular federation. The article therefore highlights the challenges of communicating public health risk in a context where the authority of religious leaders, real or imagined, undercuts the power of state institutions.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa
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Abstract

This article explores religious-feminist podcasting. Religious feminists have found a place in digital spaces, including podcasts, to connect and thrive, making themselves visible and heard to their religious communities and the broader public. Drawing on interviews with Christian feminist podcasters located in Europe and North America, this paper advances two contributions. First, unlike other forms of digital media, podcasts do not favor the emergence and circulation of specific forms of feminism. Second, focusing on materiality and the role of intimacy and emotions embedded in podcasting, I argue that Christian feminist podcasting can be seen as a form of audibility activism and that through the creation of ‘safe soundscapes’ in which to experience alternative feeling rules, Christian feminist podcasters contribute to broadening conversations concerning feminism and religion.

In: Religion and Gender

Abstract

In 1994 the Church of England ordained its first women priests and since 2014 women clergy have been appointed as bishops, a senior role in the Church’s ordained hierarchy. However, their acceptance into these roles has been highly ambivalent. How ambivalence manifests and the role of deeper beliefs about gender in the Church is under-researched, especially in understanding the positions of male clergy who oppose women’s ordination. This article draws on data sets from two separate projects conducting semi-structured interviews with both men and women in ordained ministry and compares the ambivalence towards feminism held by female clergy and theologically conservative male clergy. The argument unpacks how institutional and cultural factors intersect with tradition-specific beliefs to generate highly ambivalent views about feminism as a movement. The conclusion suggests ways feminism is mythologised and used to reframe conservative male clergy as vulnerable and as potential victims of misandry.

In: Religion and Gender
Author:

Abstract

The translation of the four Gospels into classical Chinese by Ma Xiangbo (1840–1939), published in 1949, has received little attention in the worlds of religion and scholarship. Based on a passing comment in Ma’s introduction, it is usually assumed that he based his translation on an edition of the Latin Vulgate published by Jean-Baptiste Glaire (1798–1879); however, Glaire’s work was not an edition of the Vulgate, but rather a translation of the Latin text into French. The goal of this paper is to determine the source text used by Ma Xiangbo based on textual and paratextual evidence and thus clarify this apparent contradiction.