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Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World
Elements, Nature, Environment: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World publishes high-quality scholarship that explores the relationship between the elements and the environment, covering the periods from antiquity to early modern. The series encourages cutting-edge research with a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches in the fields of including (but not limited to) history of science, philosophy, linguistics, literature, history, art history, and eco-criticism, ranging from Northern Europe and the Mediterranean world to Africa and the Middle East, India, Japan, China, and other regions. Contributions may cover the areas of history of the elements and elemental theory; environment, cosmology, and climate; well-being and the human body alongside food, nutrition, diets, herbs as well as its relevance for pharmacology and medicine; disasters and epidemics; animal lore, agriculture, and landscapes; maps and diagrams; weather, meteorology, and religion. These and other related themes could be explored either diachronically or by focusing on any specific time period between antiquity and early modern. The series promotes collaborative and comparative analysis of textual or visual sources from different traditions and historical periods, and maps points of intersection alongside differences in the way in which various civilisations understood their place within nature and the environment around them. Inter-, multi-, and cross-disciplinary approaches are particularly welcomed. The series operates with a variety of formats, from monographs and edited thematic collections to critical editions and translations into English.
Aiming to provide the ultimate guide to Byzantine scholarship, this series publishes review monographs with commentary on the current state of the field in Byzantine studies. The series promotes a broad vision of Byzantium, defining it as the society that evolved following Constantine I’s conversion to Christianity and construction of Constantinople as a new capital for the Eastern Roman Empire in the fourth century. Topics covered include well-established areas of research as well as emergent fields, challenging past historiographical approaches and suggesting new directions for future investigation. Books draw on the latest inter- and multi-disciplinary research in art history and archaeology, culture and society, history, literature, religious studies, and more, to provide critical and accessible analyses suitable for scholars, teachers, and students alike.
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Monumenta Graeca et Romana (MGR) is a peer-reviewed series concerned with the study of material and visual culture of the Greek and Roman world, chronologically ranging from later prehistory to Late Antiquity – i.e. from the middle of the second millennium BCE to the late first millennium CE. Geographically, the series covers Western Europe to the Near East, from the Black Sea to North Africa. The series publishes monographs and anthologies, as well as analytical catalogues raisonés of material in the collections of museums and other public institutions. It also publishes monographs or edited volumes that offer cohesive surveys of specific objects, types of monuments, or regions in Mediterranean and classical archaeology (in the widest possible sense). The survey format is flexible but authors should aim to be as inclusive as possible in their coverage and approaches, designing each volume to be a useful starting point for scholars and students into a new area of research. Additionally, a new subseries, MGR New Directions in Mediterranean Archaeology, is established in 2023 and will publish volumes with an explicit theoretical or methodological agenda. All MGR volumes may be published in all Open Access formats that Brill offers. All volumes, whether traditionally published or in Open Access, can be accompanied by additional data or documentation available on an online repository hosted by Brill. The language of MGR and its subseries is English.

Abstract

Catullus poem 32 has traditionally been read as describing an afternoon assignation with a prostitute. The reinterpretation offered here reads the poem not as a one-off piece about a figure mentioned nowhere else in Catullus, but rather as a poem that connects with those in the Lesbia-cycle as well as with Catullus’ metapoetic project more broadly. Ipsitilla, I argue, acts as a Muse-like figure analogous to Lesbia, and the fututiones she prepares for Catullus at his request represent his neoteric poetry: erotic, clever, and about the process of writing.

In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

This article aims to revise the editorial and interpretive tradition that regards Thy. 920-969 as a monody. Based on a systematic analysis of attribution differences in three selected plays by Seneca and, comparatively, in several other problematic places, it confirms earlier general findings: the A-branch of the MS tradition shows traces of conscious interpolation, while the codex Etruscus (E-branch) contains largely mechanical errors, which—in the case of Thy. 920-969—makes its attribution more plausible. The article further discusses the problematic passages of the ode that might have motivated interpolations, provides a critique of the interpretive assumptions supporting the A reading, and demonstrates that the attribution in the E-branch is correct in the light of the rules of Senecan poetics, as well as from the point of view of the internal logic of the text and the ethopoeia of the eponymous hero.

In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

The meaning of the term mimesis when applied to artistic works in Aristotle’s Poetics is thought to be extrapolated from its dictionary definition of ‘imitation’. I argue that a key word in the single passage directly linking mimesis to imitation has been consistently misunderstood. A correct reading could indicate mimesis has a different definition in this particular text only indirectly related to its colloquial use. I conclude that mimesis in the Poetics may be a narrower technical term that refers to a particular kind of organization or arrangement of individual imitations within an artistic work.

In: Mnemosyne
In: Mnemosyne
In: A Handbook of Modern Arabic Historical Scholarship on the Ancient and Medieval Periods
Brill Companions Online is a suite of e-book collections comprising state-of-the art research companions in various subject fields within the humanities. Peer reviewed and written by experts, these handbooks offer balanced accounts at an advanced level, along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. Designed for students and scholars, the books explain what sources there are, what methodologies and approaches are appropriate in dealing with them, what issues arise and how they have been treated, and what room there is for disagreement. All volumes are in English.

Brill Companions Online can be purchased as a whole, but is also available in six different subject categories.

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• Over 20 years of content.
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Please note that titles published since 2007, with the exception of those included in Brill’s Companions to Classical Studies Online, are also available in other E-Book collections.
Brill's Companions to Classical Studies is an expanding series of handbooks on a wide variety of subjects and persons from Classical Antiquity, and their reception in European culture. The companions provide a graduate-level synthesis of debate and the state of scholarship on the subjects. Designed for students and scholars, the books explain what sources there are, what methodologies and approaches are appropriate in dealing with them, what issues arise and how they have been treated, and what room there is for disagreement. All volumes are in English.

"Brill’s Companions offer up-to-date surveys and scholarship on anything from Greek comedy – one of the unmissable volumes – to Aphrodite, Ovid, and the Greek and Latin pastoral. They are not only valuable for their authors’ individual approaches and chosen themes: they are backed by notes and bibliographies, which are among my first resorts when embarking on a new project or returning to a well-loved subject. Brill set the standard for classical Companions; they have yet to be surpassed by others." - Robin Lane Fox, University of Oxford
"Brill’s Companions consist of not just one series but a set of series, dedicated to Classical Studies, Classical Reception, the Christian Tradition and other fields of research, including literature, history, and philosophy. Together they present a truly impressive number of highly useful reference works, which scholars can consult to quickly acquaint themselves with a particular subject. As a classical scholar I often use Brill's Companions to Classical Studies, with great satisfaction." - Franco Montanari, University of Genoa