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Empire and Environment, Soldiers and Civilians on the Eastern Front
This volume places the Eastern, especially the Austro-Russian, fronts of the Great War centre stage, examining the little-known environmental and spatial dimensions in the history of the war. The focus is particularly on the Austrian crown land of Galicia, which was transformed from a neglected periphery into a battleground of three imperial armies, and where for the first time, nature was a key protagonist.
The book balances contributions by emerging and established scholars, and benefits from a multi-language approach, expertise in the field, and extensive archival research in national archives.
Contributors are Hanna Bazhenova, Gustavo Corni, Iaroslav Golubinov, Kerstin Susanne Jobst, Tomasz Kargol, Alexandra Likhacheva, Oksana Nagornaia, David Novotny, Christoph Nübel, Gwendal Piégais, Andrea Rendl, Kamil Ruszała, Nicolas Saunders, Kerstin von Lingen, Yulia Zherdeva, and Liubov Zhvanko.
While providing a basis for all ecosystems, bugs, insects, and arachnids also destroy crops and kill humans and other animals by the millions. This book illuminates the many ways in which human lives affect and are affected by bugs as part of a wider network of species. 14 chapters reveal how knowledge, ideas, and emotions related to bugs are historically and culturally formed. With many bug populations in free fall, how can humans and bugs coexist? This book answers this question by offering a new ethics for this coexistence.

Contributors are Michaela Fenske, Minna Santaoja, Concepción Cortés Zulueta, Heidi Mikkola, Laura Hollsten, Sophie FitzMaurice, Otto Latva, Marianne Mäkelin, Taina Syrjämaa, Suvi Rytty, Sanna Lillbroända-Annala, Emily Webster, Karine Aasgaard Jansen, Heta Lähdesmäki, and Tuomas Räsänen.
Before the invention of synthetic sponges, divers culled the seabeds of the Aegean for animal sponges or "sea gold" to supply global demand, while risking paralysis or death from decompression disease. This is a study of sponge diving and the impact of the industry on the inhabitants of Kalymnos and Mediterranean. It is a record of the 10,000 divers who died, the 20,000 who were paralysed between 1886 and 1910, and the women who were there to sustain them when they returned home.
The thirteen essays and the final poem contained in this volume reflect the fundamental importance of water across the whole breadth of medieval endeavour and understanding, as both source of life, and object of scholarly fascination, whose manifestations were the source of rich symbolism and imaginings. Ranging geographically from Ireland to the Arab world and from Iceland to Byzantium and chronologically from the fourth century CE to the sixteenth, the essays explore perceptions and theories of water through a wide range of approaches.
Contributors are Michael Bintley, Tom Birkett, Laura Borghetti, Rafał Borysławski, Marilina Cesario, Marusca Francini, Kelly Grovier, Deborah Hayden, Simon Karstens, Andreas Lammer, David Livingstone, Luca Loschiavo, Hugh Magennis, Colin Fitzpatrick Murtha, François Quiviger, Elisa Ramazzina, and Karl Whittington.
Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World
Elements, Nature, Environment: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World publishes high-quality scholarship that explores the relationship between the elements and the environment, covering the periods from antiquity to early modern. The series encourages cutting-edge research with a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches in the fields of including (but not limited to) history of science, philosophy, linguistics, literature, history, art history, and eco-criticism, ranging from Northern Europe and the Mediterranean world to Africa and the Middle East, India, Japan, China, and other regions.

Contributions may cover the areas of history of the elements and elemental theory; environment, cosmology, and climate; well-being and the human body alongside food, nutrition, diets, herbs as well as its relevance for pharmacology and medicine; disasters and epidemics; animal lore, agriculture, and landscapes; maps and diagrams; weather, meteorology, and religion. These and other related themes could be explored either diachronically or by focusing on any specific time period between antiquity and early modern. The series promotes collaborative and comparative analysis of textual or visual sources from different traditions and historical periods, and maps points of intersection alongside differences in the way in which various civilisations understood their place within nature and the environment around them. Inter-, multi-, and cross-disciplinary approaches are particularly welcomed.

The series operates with a variety of formats, from monographs and edited thematic collections to critical editions and translations into English.
Volume Editors: , , and
This interdisciplinary volume provides a comprehensive and rich analysis of the century-long socio-ecological transformation of Lake Naivasha, Kenya. Major globalised processes of agricultural intensification, biodiversity conservation efforts, and natural-resource extraction have simultaneously manifested themselves in this one location.

These processes have roots in the colonial period and have intensified in the past decades, after the establishment of the cut-flower industry and the geothermal-energy industry. The chapters in this volume exemplify the multiple, intertwined socio-environmental crises that consequently have played out in Naivasha in the past and the present, and that continue to shape its future.
Series Editors: and
Chinese Research Perspectives on the Environment (CREN) is the new generation of The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Yearbooks: Environment. As with the CASS Yearbooks, the original versions of these volumes are published in China by Social Sciences Academic Press (SSAP) and are edited principally by leading researchers from CASS and other top research institutions and universities. CREN is one of the four subseries under the Chinese Research Perspectives (CRP) series, with each subseries focused on one of the four subject areas: education, the environment, population and labor, and society. The CRP volumes include English translations of contributions selected from the Chinese CASS Yearbooks. The selection of contributions for the English-language series and the translations of those volumes are supervised by international advisory boards. The CREN volumes provide English-speaking readers with firsthand information and insights into China’s top scholars’ discussions on urgent national and global environmental issues facing China. The volumes serve as a rare primary source in English for those interested in studying the development of civil society in China.

Series Editors: and
Man influences the environment and climate and the consequences are now felt around the globe. National or regional efforts to restrict or at least contain the damage can only be insufficient: in principle environmental and climate protection needs a global concept.
Paradoxically, the way we perceive environmental and climate change and handle damage is closely linked to local or regional patterns of perception. This local view is grounded not only in different ways of socio-economic development in different regions of the world, but also in differences in cultural patterns. Also, the disturbance of the environment and climate causes relatively rapid social changes, in which the interpretation of symbols for the relationship between man and nature plays an important part.
The history of climate and culture, patterns of perception of environmental and climate change and an informed assessment of the future direction of environmental and climate policy in various parts of the world have to be taken into account in order to get to grips with the problem.
From a variety of angles, such as the history of ideas, historiography, the study of civilisation, and the political sciences, the monographs and edited volumes in Climate and Culture will all deal with the following questions:
• How do local and regional cultures perceive changes in the environment and climate in past and present?
• How did and do they adjust to them?
• How do their various representatives and spokesmen introduce their respective views to the global debate and into emerging international negotiating systems?

By focussing on timber sourcing, this book sheds light on the exploitation of forests in settings outside the Iberian Peninsula, including foreign states in the southern Baltic region and the colonial territory of New Spain between the c.1740-1795.

Analysis of contracts, projects, and their implementation by the Spanish crown in the 18th century allow for a better understanding of the position of the Spanish monarchy’s nearly global efforts to sustain its naval commitments in the Atlantic World.