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This is the first critical edition and study of a unique and important Muslim polemic against Christians and Jews. The Book of Disputation was written in Arabic by a Mudejar (subject Muslim living under Christian rule in late medieval Iberia) and offers new insight into the cultural and intellectual life of this Muslim minority. The text advances arguments drawn from natural philosophy—largely from Aristotle and Averroes—along with more traditional revealed sources such as the Qurʾān and the Bible.
Mudejar communities suffered a diminution of religious and political intelligentsia over time. This text, however, highlights the author's particular conception of the world as the creation of God in his defense of Islam, demonstrates the vitality of intellectual life among Muslims in medieval Christian Iberia, and documents the continued cultivation of natural philosophy within these Muslim communities.
On sait depuis longtemps que les juifs furent, parmi bien d’autres au Caire, victimes de violences pendant la révolte du gouverneur ottoman Ahmed Pacha (1523-1524), et qu’ils commémorèrent chaque année leurs épreuves au cours d’une fête locale de Pourim. Ce livre mobilise pour la première fois une riche documentation en turc, italien et arabe sur ces violences et leur contexte. Il souligne l’apport de Capsali (m. 1550), dont la chronique de la révolte en hébreu, négligée par les chercheurs, est traduite ici ; il invite à reconsidérer l’histoire de la chronique liturgique (megillah) anonyme, donc aussi celle de la fête. Dernier avatar d’une tradition historiographique vieille de cinq siècles, il renouvelle en profondeur l’exposé des faits et l’analyse des dynamiques sociales à l’œuvre dans la révolte, en les inscrivant dans l’histoire de la transition des Mamelouks aux Ottomans en Égypte et en Syrie.

It has been long known that Jews, among many others in Cairo, were victims of violence during the revolt of the Ottoman governor Ahmed Pasha (1523-1524), and that they would commemorate their sufferings each year, during a local Purim festival. For the first time, this book draws on a wealth of documentation in Turkish, Italian and Arabic on these acts of violence and their context. It highlights the contribution of Capsali (d. 1550), whose chronicle of the revolt in Hebrew – neglected by scholars – has been translated here; it also prompts readers to reconsider the history of the anonymous liturgical chronicle (megillah), and therefore that of the festival as well. As the last avatar of a five-century-old historiographical tradition, it thoroughly recasts the presentation of facts along with an analysis of the social dynamics at work in the revolt, contextualizing them within the history of the transition from the Mamluks to the Ottomans in Egypt and Syria.
In: Ahmed Pacha et les juifs du Caire (1523-1524)
In: Ahmed Pacha et les juifs du Caire (1523-1524)
In: Ahmed Pacha et les juifs du Caire (1523-1524)
In: Ahmed Pacha et les juifs du Caire (1523-1524)
In: Ahmed Pacha et les juifs du Caire (1523-1524)
This volume sheds light on the historical background and political circumstances that encouraged the dialogue between Eastern-European Christians and Arabic-speaking Christians of the Middle East in Ottoman times, as well as the means employed in pursuing this dialogue for several centuries. The ties that connected Eastern European Christianity with Arabic-speaking Christians in the 16th-19th centuries are the focus of this book. Contributors address the Arabic-speaking hierarchs’ and scholars’ connections with patriarchs and rulers of Constantinople, the Romanian Principalities, Kyiv, and the Tsardom of Moscow, the circulation of literature, models, iconography, and knowhow between the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and research dedicated to them by Eastern European scholars.

Contributors are Stefano Di Pietrantonio, Ioana Feodorov, Serge Frantsouzoff, Bernard Heyberger, Elena Korovtchenko, Sofia Melikyan, Charbel Nassif, Constantin A. Panchenko, Yulia Petrova, Vera Tchentsova, Mihai Ţipău and Carsten Walbiner.
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Résumé

Greek was essential for the representatives of the Church of Antioch during their journey, especially in Constantinople and in the Romanian Principalities. Patriarch Makarios III and his son, the Archdeacon Paul, used Greek both in Church services and in their daily interactions with Greeks and Romanians. During his sojourn of almost two months in Constantinople, Paul of Aleppo was also interested in seeing and identifying the traces of Byzantine Empire that he was familiar with from his readings. He looked for the past glory of Byzantium even in the Romanian Principalities and in Russia. Knowledgeable in Byzantine history, Paul of Aleppo compares the information obtained from books with the realities on the ground. The result is an account that often surpasses those of the Western travelers in the East. The aim of the present paper is to trace the information about Byzantium and the Greeks in Paul of Aleppo’s travel account and to propose a new approach of this data for historians of the Byzantine heritage.

In: Arabic Christianity between the Ottoman Levant and Eastern Europe
Author:

Résumé

In 1969, an exhibition of Lebanese and Syrian icons, under the scientific direction of Virgil Cândea and curated by Sylvia Agémian, took place at the Sursock Museum in Beirut. This exhibition revealed the existence of local artistic compositions between the 17th and the 19th centuries. After consultation with Lebanese specialists, these icons were labeled “Melkites” by Cândea. Fifty years later, this contribution aims to record the historiography of the Melkite art by looking at the research that was dedicated to it before 1969 and the 18 exhibitions that revealed the Melkite art to the Arab and European publics, as well as by reviewing the publications and significant scientific studies that allowed us to enrich our knowledge of this outstanding art form.

In: Arabic Christianity between the Ottoman Levant and Eastern Europe